Welcome to the UA Campus Repository, a service of the University of Arizona Libraries. The repository shares, archives and preserves unique digital materials from faculty, staff, students and affiliated contributors. Contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with any questions.

Featured submissions

June 2019

  • Congratulations to Spring 2019 graduates from the Honors College. Honors College Theses from 250 graduates are now available in the repository.

May 2019

  • Sixteen titles from the UA Press Open Arizona collection are now available in the repository. The scholarship "emphasizes the relevance of the southwestern United States to understanding contemporary American life." You can read, browse, and download these books from both the Open Arizona website and from the Open Arizona collection in the repository.
  • Congratulations to Spring 2019 graduates in the Master of Landscape Architecture program. Their master's reports are now available in the repository.

April 2019

  • BIODIVERSITY & INCLUSION: Leveraging community connections into shared stewardship and increased conservation capacity at Tumamoc Hill and beyond

    Livingston, Margaret; Casebeer, Nichole (The University of Arizona., 2019)
    The question is not if, but ever increasingly, how and where do urban areas and conservation intersect, and further how urban regions will shape the future of the planet’s biodiversity. As reported by the IUCN, in many parts of the world they [Urban Protected Areas] are the only places not completely dominated by human influence, and the only hope for the survival of many of the world’s plant and animal species, including humans themselves. The primary goal of protected areas is conservation, and protecting the region’s natural and cultural diversity, however traditional conservation is often focused on controlling human disturbance through restrictive measures - extremely limiting and/or eliminating human access and influence to sensitive areas. Increasingly, it is being recognized that urban areas require unique conservation approaches which acknowledge the extent to which human and natural systems are interconnected, for better and for worse. Rather than focusing on the worst and eliminating these connections, more contemporary approaches focus on embracing and celebrating this contact, and building community connections to sensitive natural areas through which urban residents can positively engage with the natural environment and play a more active role in conservation. This project focuses on Tumamoc Hill, and its need to think beyond Tumamoc’s traditional “island” boundaries and a preserve & protect approach to conservation and research. It explores how UPAs are critical spaces for cultivating and disseminating ecological knowledge and strategies through which human and natural communities - which have co-evolved for 1,000’s of years - can potentially co-exist in supportive and even mutually beneficial ways. The design begins to envision how Tumamoc can cultivate community connections and creative conservation practices that will support and protect Tumamoc’s rich heritage and support conservation within its borders and even beyond.
  • Bridging the Gap with Tucson's Urban Fissure

    Rapp, Ethan Yuri (The University of Arizona., 2016)
    As cities continue to develop, they can experience changes and subsequent decline in particular industries and land uses. In some cases, structures are abandoned and vacant lots remain as remnants of past uses. In central Tucson, Arizona, there is a fragment of land that separates two important districts. The proposed site, Tucson’s Urban Fissure, can be viewed as a landscape that is underutilized, barren, scorched, and is in need of a new identity. To the north of the Urban Fissure, sits an avenue of shops and restaurants that are well established, and to the south a newly built, thriving, living, urban hub. This fissure provides an opportunity to help fuse these districts. This area has the potential to link two thriving urban nodes: Fourth Avenue and Downtown Tucson. Currently this, Urban Fissure has a set of historic train tracks running along its side. This cultural inspiration along with Iron Horse Park can be looked at as a set of catalysts that can help spur a new sense of identity for this site. Through the creation of an urban park on Tucson’s Urban Fissure, the author will provide the city of Tucson with a valuable addition to its urban fabric. Through special attention to spatial scale, circulation, shelter and refuge areas, and spatio- temporal landscape patterns, the design will realize a new image for the cavity that currently sits in between central Tucson Arizona’s most heavily used districts (4th Avenue and Downtown), while also activating the underutilized land. This work is intended to illustrate to the city how the sense of movement can bridge the gap in needed linkages within the urban fabric of Tucson.
  • Xm(2) Scores for Estimating Total Exposure to Multimodal Strategies Identified by Pharmacists for Managing Pain: Validity Testing and Clinical Relevance

    Axon, David Rhys; Bhattacharjee, Sandipan; Warholak, Terri L; Slack, Marion K; Univ Arizona, Coll Pharm, Dept Pharm Practice & Sci (HINDAWI LTD, 2018-01-01)
    Objective. To assess the validity of an exposure score obtained from the Xm(2) tool for all pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies used by individuals to manage chronic pain. Methods. Using data from individuals with chronic pain, eXposure multimodal (Xm(2)) scores were calculated by assigning one point for every 100 mg of morphine equivalent used (opioid medications); 25% of the maximum recommended exposure used (nonopioid medications); and any use of another strategy then summed. Content, criterion, construct, and convergent validity were assessed. Results. The sample of 149 individuals used a mean of 12.6 (SD = 4.6) strategies to manage pain and had a mean Xm(2) score of 16.8 (SD = 9.1). Content validity was established by demonstrating that the pain management strategies identified were also reported in the literature. Criterion validity was established by the positive association of exposure scores with the following: interference with work (odds ratio (OR) = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-4.36), daily activities (OR = 2.10, CI = 1.07-4.13), relationships (OR = 1.98, CI = 1.01-3.88), and leisure activities (OR = 2.31, CI = 1.18-4.50); workdays missed (OR = 5.10, CI = 1.92-13.58); emergency department visits (OR = 3.40, CI = 1.17-9.91); hospitalizations (OR = 4.18, CI = 0.86-20.37); and by a negative association with satisfaction (OR = 0.40, CI = 0.18-0.88). Construct validity was established by the positive association of exposure with baseline pain intensity (p < 0.01) and odds of experiencing an adverse event (OR = 2.31, CI = 1.18-4.52). Convergent validity was established through correlations of pain intensity from the Xm(2) score and existing quantitative analgesic questionnaire (QAQ) score. Discussion. Xm(2) scores represent a valid estimate of total exposure to multimodal strategies used and provide clinically relevant information for deciding what strategies to use at what level.
  • Creating a Multi-modal Transit Corridor: Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

    Alammar, Mashal Hamed (The University of Arizona., 2015)
    The aim of this research is to address the lack of transportation and connectivity in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The industrial field is the biggest investment for Saudi Arabia, and the number of commuting industrial employees has become an enormous burden on the infrastructure system. Jubail Industrial city is located in an expanding and dynamic area and contains experts, companies and colleges focusing on the industrial sector, but it is suffering from the tremendous number of mobility issues for commuters. More than 45,000 employees and students commute daily to Jubail City from Dammam, Qatif, and Ras-Al Khair, and they face many problems on their way such as traffic, accidents, and pollution. Thus, this project will address these issues, and provide a regional plan containing a multi-modal transportation corridor connected with urban hubs between Jubail and Dammam.
  • DEPOT PARK Reviving a Layered Landscape

    Marenfeld, Jonathan (The University of Arizona., 2016)
    As Tucson grows and its downtown is revitalized open spaces are quickly disappearing. The lack of open space downtown is partially due to the temporary closure of Viente de Agosto Park, the pending closure Jácome Plaza near the Main Library, and numerous development opportunities. Cities of all sizes seem to have a park that hosts events big and small and gives its residents a taste of nature in an urban environment. Many studies have shown that urban parks provide city residents social and psychological benefits while also having ecological and environmental services (Chiesura, p. 129). The goal of this project is to create an urban park for downtown Tucson that is capable of hosting events, festivals, or just lunch with a friend. The park will serve as a major stop along various established and planned routes. It will also be designed in a way that conserves water while using solar and wind technologies to reduce the need for already strained and increasingly expensive resources. To aid in the concepts and design GIS data, case reviews, and local regulations and ordinances will be explored.

View more