Welcome to the UA Campus Repository, a service of the University of Arizona Libraries. The repository shares, archives and preserves unique digital materials from faculty, staff, students and affiliated contributors. Contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu with any questions.

 

Featured submissions

February 2021

  • Tree-Ring Research, Volume 71 (2015) is now publicly available in the repository.
  • Meteoritics & Planetary Science, Volumes 37-44 (2002-2009) are now publicly available in the repository.
  • Radiocarbon, Volumes 1-54 (1959-2012) are now publicly available in the repository.
  • Theses from Spring/Summer 2020 Honors College graduates are now publicly available in the repository.

January 2021

  • More than 8,400 journal articles from University of Arizona faculty, staff and researchers have been made available since the implementation of the UA Open Access Policy (April 2016). You can find these articles in the UA Faculty Publications collection - thank you to all our article authors and contributors!

December 2020

 

  • Faculty Senate Minutes January 25, 2021

    University of Arizona Faculty Senate (Tucson, AZ), 2021-01-25
  • SPBAC Minutes February 17, 2021

    University of Arizona Strategic Planning and Budget Advisory Committee (SPBAC), / (The University of Arizona, 2021-02-17)
  • Trimming and Planing Rough-Cut Wood for Efficient Dendrochronological Sample Preparation and Storage

    Minor, J.J.; Arizpe, A.H. (Tree Ring Society, 2015-07)
    Wood samples larger than increment cores collected for tree-ring studies are often obtained using chainsaws and, less frequently, 2-person crosscut saws. Saw marks on cross-sectional wood samples can be quite deep and uneven, and sanding rough-cut wood cross-sections is inefficient in terms of processing time and wear on sanding belts. Trimming rough-cut wood samples with a band saw or treating with a surface planer creates a smoother initial surface for sample sanding and polishing. Sample trimming with a band saw or surface planer is also useful for post-analysis archiving and wood storage, when excess wood can be removed and smaller samples entered into storage. Band saw and surface planer safety techniques are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 by The Tree-Ring Society.
  • A Method for Tree-Ring Analysis Using Diva-Gis Freeware on Scanned Core Images

    Arenas-Castro, S.; Fernández-Haeger, J.; Jordano-Barbudo, D. (Tree Ring Society, 2015-07)
    Tree-ring analysis is a basic technique of paramount importance in forest management, yet it may prove difficult and time-consuming for many slow-growth hardwood tree species. Moreover, it requires the use of specialized tools and proprietary software, which may hinder researchers working with limited budgets. We describe an innovative and inexpensive method using DIVA-GIS freeware software to analyze true color high-resolution scanned images of cores previously enhanced with ImageJ freeware (GIS-SDI), and test its accuracy against the widely-used LINTAB-TSAPWin™ and WinDENDRO™ methods. For this purpose, Abies pinsapo and Pyrus bourgaeana increment cores were processed independently using each of the three methods and the results were statistically compared. Dating results were consistent across all three methods, although identifying rings was easier and quicker to perform on the digital images. Using a modern but affordable flatbed scanner to digitize tree cores and the free DIVA-GIS software to analyze the scanned digital images proved to be an inexpensive but highly accurate and efficient approach to tree-ring analysis. Furthermore, this method greatly facilitates tree-ring analysis in species with inconspicuous rings, and enables a complete digital record of every core analyzed to be stored. Copyright © 2015 by The Tree-Ring Society.
  • Competitive Strength Effect in the Climate Response of Scots Pine Radial Growth in South-Central Siberia Forest-Steppe

    Babushkina, E.A.; Vaganov, E.A.; Belokopytova, L.V.; Shishov, V.V.; Grachev, A.M. (Tree Ring Society, 2015-07)
    This paper presents a method for classification of trees in groups depending on parameters of the age trend in tree-ring width. The method is tested on a sample containing 194 trees of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) growing in the forest-steppe zone of the South of Central Siberia. The climatic response of tree-ring width in such climatic conditions is complex. The influence of temperature in May-September is negative (moisture reducing). Warm-season precipitation serving as a source of moisture is a positive factor. Another positive factor is cold-season precipitation as frost protection. We determined the dependence of this response on the local conditions (soil, landscape and anthropogenic factors). The competitive strength of the trees influences both the sensitivity of individual trees to extreme climatic factors and the timing of growth processes. The latter implies the duration of the period of significant response to climate. It appears promising to take this influence into account in dendroclimatic reconstructions by using separate clusters of trees based on the competitive strength and having the maximum response to the reconstructed factor. Copyright © 2015 by The Tree-Ring Society.

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