• Finding Problems Versus Solving Them: Inquiry in Information Seeking

      Bruce, Bertram C. (2006-06)
      This is the keynote presentation delivered at The Sixth Conference on Problem-Based Learning in Finland: Constructing Knowledge in information society, Tampere, 2006 June 6-7. Abstract: Finding information, especially accurate, timely, and relevant information, is increasingly important in nearly all human endeavors. Accordingly, numerous studies have examined the processes information seekers employ, as well as the strategies information providers use to meet their needs. Most models emphasize satisfaction or closure as the criterion for successful completion of an information search; thus the emphasis is on solving a specific problem. But often, information seeking is part of some larger process, which is invisible to the information provider and often unclear even to the seeker. Successful search may lead not so much to eliminating an existing, well-defined problem, as to delineating a new problem within a complex, ill-defined space. This paper examines information seeking from an inquiry, or problem-based perspective, and argues that the fields of information seeking and problem-based learning can benefit from closer dialogue.
    • Finding Problems Versus Solving Them: Inquiry in Information Seeking

      Bruce, Bertram C. (2006-06)
      This is the keynote presentation delivered at The Sixth Conference on Problem-Based Learning in Finland: Constructing knowledge in information society, Tampere, 2006 June 6-7. Abstract: Finding information, especially accurate, timely, and relevant information, is increasingly important in nearly all human endeavors. Accordingly, numerous studies have examined the processes information seekers employ, as well as the strategies information providers use to meet their needs. Most models emphasize satisfaction or closure as the criterion for successful completion of an information search; thus the emphasis is on solving a specific problem. But often, information seeking is part of some larger process, which is invisible to the information provider and often unclear even to the seeker. Successful search may lead not so much to eliminating an existing, well-defined problem, as to delineating a new problem within a complex, ill-defined space. This paper examines information seeking from an inquiry, or problem-based perspective, and argues that the fields of information seeking and problem-based learning can benefit from closer dialogue.
    • Inquiry as Both Action and Understanding

      Bruce, Bertram C. (2006-03)
      There are many approaches to fostering authentic inquiry in educational settings and communities, but many suffer from the inconsistency inherent in top-down approaches. What happens when users are not merely recipients of a design for inquiry, but take an active role in creating that design? This presentation examines three examples: (1) Chickscope, a K-12 science education project, (2) Paseo Boricua, a community in Chicago, and (3) Ethnography of the University, a project in which undergraduates research the lived experiences within the university.
    • Inquiry-Based Learning in LIS Education: Enacting Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL)

      Nazarova, Muzhgan; Bruce, Bertram C.; Bishop, Ann Peterson (2006-03)
      Making the inquiry into student learning a key component in Library and Information Science (LIS) education and increasing learning by fostering individual inquiry and developing a community that will support such an inquiry fits well within a field of LIS where dealing with inquiries on a daily basis is a major part of our work, providing more flexibility and developing and engaging in different communities of inquiry with people from all walks of life. The authors are trying to explore and demonstrate a strong connection between inquiry-based learning (IBL) concepts in LIS education and a development of scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL). Building the parallels between the Ernest Boyerâ s paradigm of scholarship and John Deweyâ s cycle of inquiry, they put forward an argument that inquiry-based learning in LIS is a new approach to a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in LIS education. Presentation consists of the following parts: (1) A short overview of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning which will include some background information, definitions and characteristics of SOTL including Boyerâ s paradigm followed by a brief overview of the SOTL-related activities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) as well as a Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS) (2/3) Inquiry and inquiry based learning and how we bring an inquiry approach to LIS education. A description of inquiry related work and activities at GSLIS including newly launched Community Inquiry Initiative (CII) linking them to SOTL (4) Report on the results of a pilot study of the students taking the Community Inquiry (CI) track courses