• Developing Open Source Software for High End Computing

      Gray, James N.; Hillis, W. Daniel; Kahn, Robert E.; Kennedy, Ken; Miller, John P.; Nagel, David C.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Smarr, Larry; Thompson, Joe F.; Vadasz, Leslie; et al. (2000-09)
      In the attached report, we focus exclusively on software development for high end computing (sometimes referred to as high-performance computing or supercomputing) because of its critical importance to U. S. national security and science and engineering research. Our 1999 analysis revealed that while there were a number of high end applications ripe for exploration, the field was in need of substantial innovations in application-development software, algorithms, programming methods, component technologies, and architecture. The report makes three recommendations. First, the Federal government should aggressively encourage the development of open source software for high end computing. Adopting this recommendation will require a technical assessment of the software needs for high end computing as well as an innovative management plan and funding model for supporting this development. Second, a "level playing field" must be created within the government procurement process to facilitate open source development. Third, an analysis of open source licensing agreements is needed, with an ultimate goal of agreeing upon a single common licensing agreement for open source software applications.
    • Digital Libraries: Universal Access to Human Knowledge

      Nagel, David C.; Chen, Ching-chih; Gray, James N.; Kahn, Robert E.; Reddy, Raj (2001-02)
      In Digital Libraries: Universal Access to Human Knowledge, the Committee offers its findings and recommendations for how digital libraries can be an essential resource for human learning and development. The PITAC offers four key recommendations that will make digital libraries more pervasive and usable by all citizens: *Expanded research in metadata and metadata use, scalability, interoperability, archival storage and preservation, intellectual property rights, privacy and security, and human use *Create several Federally funded large-scale digital library testbeds *Provide Federal funding to make all public Federal content persistently available in digital form on the Internet *Have the Federal government play a leadership role in evolving policy to fairly address intellectual property rights in the digital age
    • Transforming Access to Government Information

      Gray, James N.; Hillis, W. Daniel; Kahn, Robert E.; Kennedy, Ken; Miller, John P.; Nagel, David C.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Smarr, Larry; Thompson, Joe F.; Vadasz, Leslie; et al. (2000-09)
      In Transforming Health Care Through Information Technology the PITAC offers six key recommendations that could significantly expand access to health care, improve its quality, reduce its costs, and transform the conduct of biomedical research. The PITAC sees these recommendations as critical steps toward addressing the challenges that exist to improving Americans' health and health care: *Establish pilot projects and Enabling Technology Centers to extend the practical uses of information technology to health care systems and biomedical research; *NIH, in close collaboration with NSF, DARPA, and DOE, should design and deploy a scalable national computing and information infrastructure to support the biomedical research community; *Congress should enhance existing privacy rules by enacting legislation that assures sound practices for managing personally identifiable health information; Establish programs to increase the pool of biomedical research and health care professionals with training at the intersection of health and information technology; *DHHS should outline its vision for using IT to improve health care and subsequently devote the resources to conduct the IT research critical to accomplishing these goals in the long term; and *DHHS should appoint a senior information technology leader to provide strategic leadership across DHHS and focus on the importance of information technology in addressing pressing problems in health care
    • Transforming Health Care Through Information Technology

      Gray, James N.; Hillis, W. Daniel; Kahn, Robert E.; Kennedy, Ken; Miller, John P.; Nagel, David C.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Smarr, Larry; Thompson, Joe F.; Vadasz, Leslie; et al. (2001-02)
      In Transforming Health Care Through Information Technology the PITAC offers six key recommendations that could significantly expand access to health care, improve its quality, reduce its costs, and transform the conduct of biomedical research. The PITAC sees these recommendations as critical steps toward addressing the challenges that exist to improving Americans' health and health care: *Establish pilot projects and Enabling Technology Centers to extend the practical uses of information technology to health care systems and biomedical research; *NIH, in close collaboration with NSF, DARPA, and DOE, should design and deploy a scalable national computing and information infrastructure to support the biomedical research community; *Congress should enhance existing privacy rules by enacting legislation that assures sound practices for managing personally identifiable health information; Establish programs to increase the pool of biomedical research and health care professionals with training at the intersection of health and information technology; *DHHS should outline its vision for using IT to improve health care and subsequently devote the resources to conduct the IT research critical to accomplishing these goals in the long term; and *DHHS should appoint a senior information technology leader to provide strategic leadership across DHHS and focus on the importance of information technology in addressing pressing problems in health care
    • Using Information Technology to Transform the Way We Learn

      Gray, James N.; Hillis, W. Daniel; Kahn, Robert E.; Kennedy, Ken; Miller, John P.; Nagel, David C.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Smarr, Larry; Thompson, Joe F.; Vadasz, Leslie; et al. (2001-02)
      Using Information Technology to Transform the Way We Learn highlights PITACâ s findings and recommendations on how the Federal government can provide the leadership needed to solve key information technology challenges and to improve the quality of, and public access to educational and training experiences. The overarching recommendation in this report calls for the Federal government to make the integration of information technology with education and training a national priority. In addition, the Federal government should: *Establish and coordinate a major research initiative for information technology in education and training *Establish focused government-industry-foundation partnerships to aggressively pursue the information technology research program *Develop programs that enable educators and related professionals to use information technology effectively *Work with industry and academia to develop technical standards for extendable component-based technologies and infrastructures that can be widely used in online education and training