• A Repeated Survey Analysis of AskERIC User Survey Data, 1998-2002

      Pomerantz, Jeffrey; Lankes, R. David; Janes, Joseph; Smith, Linda C.; Finneran, Christina M. (Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc., 2004)
      Four surveys of users of the AskERIC email reference service were conducted, during the years 1998, 2000, 2001, and 2002. These surveys presented a snapshot of the AskERIC user population and user satisfaction at a single point in time. This paper reanalyzes the findings from these surveys utilizing repeated survey techniques. This paper presents the evolution of some of the demographics of AskERICâ s user population over time, as well as the evolution of AskERIC user behavior. As perhaps the oldest AskA service in existence, this analysis of AskERIC data sheds light on the evolution of all AskA services, and of email-based reference services in general.
    • Representations of Women in 19th Century Media Essay Assignment

      Dickstein, Ruth (2001)
      Library materials for an assignment in Women's Studies 240 (Suffragists, Sistahs, and Riot Grrrls: An Introduction to Women's Studies) at the University of Arizona
    • Representing and Aligning Thesauri for an Integrated Access to Cultural Heritage Resources

      Isaac, Antoine; Matthezing, Henk; Cordeiro, Maria Inês (UDC Consortium, 2007)
      In this paper, we show how Semantic Web techniques can help to solve semantic interoperability issues in the cultural heritage domain. In particular, these techniques can enable integrated access to heterogeneous collections by representing their controlled description vocabularies (e.g. thesauri) in a standardized format â Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS). We also present existing automatic alignment procedures that can assist cultural heritage practitioners to connect such vocabularies at the semantic level, building similarity links between the concepts they contain.
    • Requirements analysis for hypertext applications: the why, what and how approach

      Dillon, Andrew (1991)
      This item is not the definitive copy. Please use the following citation when referencing this material: Dillon, A. (1991) Requirements analysis for hypertext applications: the why, what and how approach. Applied Ergonomics, 22(4), 458-462. Abstract: The present paper presents a simple task description procedure for text usage aimed at supporting human factors input to the specification stage of hypertext and electronic document design. The need for such techniques is outlined and the approach is described in the context of designing hypertext versions of software manuals. Applications and limitations of this procedure are discussed.
    • A Research Method to Investigate Information Seeking using the Concept of Information Horizons: An Example from a Study of Lower Socio-economic Studentsâ Information Seeking Behavior

      Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Harmon, Gary L. (2001)
      Winner of the Association of Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) Research Methodology Best Paper in 2001 Award. Abstract: As research questions and topics in information studies evolve, there is a continual need to seek out innovative research methods to help us investigate and address these questions. This paper presents an emerging research method, the creation and analysis of information horizon maps, and discusses the use of such maps in an ongoing research study. Sonnenwald's (1999) framework for human information behavior provides a theoretical foundation for this method. This theoretical framework suggests that within a context and situation is an 'information horizon' in which we can act. Study participants are asked to describe several recent information seeking situations for a particular context, and to draw a map of their information horizon, graphically representing the information resources (including people) they typically access in this context and their preferences for the resources accessed. The resulting graphical representation of their information horizons are analyzed in conjunction with the interview data using a variety of techniques derived from social network analysis and content analysis. In this paper these techniques are described and illustrated using examples from an ongoing study of the information seeking behavior of lower socio-economic students. They are then compared to other techniques that could be used to gather data about people's information seeking behavior.
    • Research Note: Information Guidelines for State Chronic Wasting Disease Web sites

      Eschenfelder, Kristin R. (2006)
      This preprint has been published in Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11(3). State wildlife agencies have little guidance about what Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) information to present on their Websites. This article describes four approaches to public information publication (private citizen view, attentive citizen view, deliberative citizen view, stakeholder publisher) that agency staff can employ to consider what CWD information to offer to the public.
    • Research Note: Information Guidelines for State Chronic Wasting Disease Web sites.

      Eschenfelder, Kristin R.; Vaske, Jerry J.; Manfredo, Michael J. (Routledge, 2006)
      This preprint has been published in Human Dimensions of Wildlife 11(3) 2006. State wildlife agencies have little guidance about what Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) information to present on their Websites. This article describes four approaches to public information publication (private citizen view, attentive citizen view, deliberative citizen view, stakeholder publisher) that agency staff can employ to consider what CWD information to offer to the public.
    • Resource Description Diagram Supplement to “Cataloging Theory in Search of Graph Theory and Other Ivory Towers. Object: Cultural Heritage Resource Description Networks.”

      Murray, Ronald J.; Tillett, Barbara B.; Library of Congress (2011-08-15)
      These documents supplement the previously deposited Murray and Tillett working paper: “Cataloging Theory in Search of Graph Theory and Other Ivory Towers. Object: Cultural Heritage Resource Description Networks.” http://hdl.handle.net/10150/136270. A different version of Fig 8, “FRBR Paper Tool Diagram Elements And Graphs” is included. Documents not referenced in the paper include: “Modeling The Superwork Issue,” which models the concept of a Work composed of other Works two ways; “Progressive Disaggregation,” which demonstrates the recursive process by which simple resource and descriptions composed of other descriptions are resolved to elementary graph structures; and “Serial Publication,” which highlights the pedagogical and IT system guidance role that FRBR resource description diagrams can play with respect to complex publishing phenomena. A “Find & Navigate” diagram element has been introduced in the serial publication diagram as a theoretical necessity with practical implications. The elements provide a consistent means for depicting the linking functions provided by identifiers, name and subject authority records, and prescribed and arbitrary relationships. The tables and legends found on the right side of the diagram suggest how diagram components may be expressed as “triple” style statements for implementation-minded readers.
    • Resource Sharing among State Agricultural University and ICAR Institute Libraries in India through Web Portal

      Rathinasabapathy, G.; Amudhavalli, A.; Sasikala, C.; Somasekhara Rao, K.; Varalakshmi, R.S.R.; Vijaya Kumari, J.; Bhaskara Rao, P.; David Livingstone, N.; Kundra, Ramesh (Department of Library & Information Science, Ahdhra University & SIS, 2005)
      Web portal is becoming increasingly important and more sophisticated as it provides an entry point to the Internet, and offers value-added services such as directories, searching, news, and links to related web sites. Since the web portal is viewed as a virtual reference library directing web-surfers to desired destinations, the paper provides a conceptual plan of designing a web portal for sharing library and information resources among State Agricultural Universities (SAU) in India as there is no such facility available at present. Though most of the Agricultural Universities in India have a presence on the web and been provided with Internet connectivity, the LIS resources donâ t have a presence on the web sites of the Agricultural Universities. Since agricultural science educators, researchers and policy makers need a lot of current information with regard to the education, research and extension aspects of agricultural sciences, it is proposed to design a web portal so as to enable them to have access to the holding details of current periodicals and back volumes of the State Agricultural University libraries and Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) libraries in India. This paper attempts to present a preliminary proposal to develop a web portal for sharing resources among SAU and ICAR institute libraries.
    • Response to Elitism

      Mulvaney, John Philip (1990-09)
      This article argues the improper of terming "elite" in the evaluation of LIS programs by Herubel's research. It disagrees with Herubel about her definition and analytical strategies.
    • Results from a German terminology mapping effort: intra- and interdisciplinary cross-concordances between controlled vocabularies

      Mayr, Philipp; Petras, Vivien; Walter, Anne-Kathrin (2007)
      In 2004, the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research funded a major terminology mapping initiative at the GESIS Social Science Information Centre in Bonn (GESIS-IZ), which will find its conclusion this year. The task of this terminology mapping initiative was to organize, create and manage â crossconcordancesâ between major controlled vocabularies (thesauri, classification systems, subject heading lists) centred around the social sciences but quickly extending to other subject areas. This project is the largest terminology mapping effort in Germany. The number and variety of controlled vocabularies targeted provide an optimal basis for insights and further research opportunities. To our knowledge, terminology mapping efforts have rarely been evaluated with stringent qualitative and quantitative measures. This research should contribute in this area. For the NKOS workshop, we plan to present an overview of the project and participating vocabularies, an introduction to the heterogeneity service and its application as well as some of the results and findings of the evaluation, which will be concluded in August.
    • Review Essay: Theorizing Information and Communications Technologies as Memory Practices, a Review of Memory Practices in the Sciences by Geoffrey Bowker, Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, 2005

      Eschenfelder, Kristin R. (2006-08)
      This is a preprint to appear in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. A review of Memory Practices in the Sciences by Geoffrey Bowker, Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, 2005. See also Matienzo, Mark A. (2006) Review of Memory Practices in the Sciences, by Geoffrey C. Bowker. Journal of the Association for History and Computing 9(2) available in dLIST.
    • Review Essay: Theorizing Information and Communications Technologies as Memory Practices, a Review of Memory Practices in the Sciences by Geoffrey Bowker, Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, 2005

      Eschenfelder, Kristin R. (2006-08)
      A review of Memory Practices in the Sciences by Geoffrey Bowker, Cambridge MA: The MIT Press, 2005
    • Review of Memory Practices in the Sciences, by Geoffrey C. Bowker

      Matienzo, Mark A. (2007-02)
      A review of Bowker's 2006 book published by MIT Press.
    • Review of Memory Practices in the Sciences, by Geoffrey C. Bowker

      Matienzo, Mark A. (2006)
      A review of Bowker's 2006 book published by MIT Press.
    • Revisiting the Preserved Context Index System (PRECIS): The Bridge between Hierarchically Structured Thesauri and Facetted Classifications

      Kwasnik, Barbarak; Breitenstein, Mikel (dLIST, 2004)
      This presentation will address the difficult task of representing complex concepts in a text in a way that reflects their contextual meaning. The preservation of context enables the disambiguation of a termiÌ s possible multiple senses, and also shows how the term is being used. In developing these ideas we revisit an indexing system called PRECIS, which was developed by Derek Austin in the early 1970s for subject indexing for the British National Bibliography, and subsequently developed by him with the assistance of Mary Dykstra into a adaptable method of linking both the semantics and syntax of indexing terms.
    • Revolutionizing Science and Engineering Through Cyberinfrastructure: Report of the National Science Foundation Blue-Ribbon Advisory Panel on Cyberinfrastructure

      Atkins, Daniel (2003-01)
      This 84-page report defines the Cyberinfrastructure program proposed by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Here is the text of the news release from the University of Michigan School of Information: " Atkins committee issues NSF report on development of cyberinfrastructure (Feb 2003) A National Science Foundation (NSF) committee chaired by University of Michigan professor Daniel Atkins has recommended the organization spend an additional $1 billion per year developing the nation's "cyberinfrastructure" to support scientific research. The Advisory Committee on Cyberinfrastructure argues that investment in a comprehensive cyberinfrastructure can change profoundly what scientists and engineers do, how they do it, and who participates. Its recommendations are detailed in a newly released report titled Revolutionizing Science and Engineering through Cyberinfrastructure. In the same way society now depends on highways, water systems, and power grids, the panel contends, scientific research in the coming years will depend on the quality of the cyberinfrastructure -- the integrated information, computing, and communications systems that tie us together. "It's not just the raw technology, but also the organization and the people," says Atkins, who is professor in the School of Information and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at U-M. It's also the standards for interoperability that will allow different disciplines to use the same infrastructure, "just the way we agreed long ago on a standard gauge for railroad tracks." "The path forward that this report envisions ... truly has the potential to revolutionize all fields of research and education," says Peter Freeman, assistant director of the NSF for Computer and Information Sciences and Engineering (CISE), the NSF arm that commissioned the report. The report was issued on the same day the NSF submitted its $5.48 billion budget request for fiscal year 2004. "NSF has been a catalyst for creating the conditions for a nascent cyberinfrastructure-based revolution," says Atkins, a revolution being driven from the ground up. "We've clearly documented extensive grass-roots activity in the scientific and engineering research community to create and use cyberinfrastructure to empower the next wave of discovery." The committee cites NSF support for such projects as the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulations (NEES), the TeraGrid effort, and the Digital Libraries Initiative as seminal in the development of a cyberinfrastructure. At the same time, the report makes clear that the cyberinfrastructure needed cannot be built with today's off-the-shelf technology, and it argues for increased NSF support for fundamental research in computer science and engineering. The report emphasizes the importance of acting quickly and the risks of failing to do so. Those risks include lack of coordination, which could leave key data in irreconcilable formats; long-term failures to archive and curate data collected at great expense; and artificial barriers between disciplines built from incompatible tools and structures. The NSF has a "once-in-a-generation opportunity," according to the committee, to lead the scientific and engineering community in the coordinated development and expansive use of cyberinfrastructure."