• D-Scholarship: Florida State Universityâ s Institutional Repository

      McDonald, Robert H. (2005-06)
      This presentation was made at a LITA panel on Institutional Repositories at the Annual ALA meeting in Chicago, IL on June 27, 2005.
    • The Dag Hammarskjold Library (DHL) : Role in Bridging the Information Gap with particular Reference to The Developing Countries

      Mangla, P. B. (2002)
      Opening Excerpt from Presentation: It is most appropriate that the present Symposium is being organised in order to pay tribute to Dag Hammarskjold who dedicated himself to peace in the world, and to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Dag Hammarskjold Library, which certainly is a legacy of the late Secretary General. The United Nations Library was given the present name on November 16, 1961 as a Memorial to the late Dag Hammarskjold, UN Secretary General, who was killed in an aircraft crash on September 17, 1961. It certainly was a befitting tribute to a great human being, a poet, philosopher and a mystic. He had all the attributes of a Karamayogi as given in Bhagavad Gita, a well-known Hindu scripture. He had extensive interests as a bibliophile who knew so well both the wisdom and beauty to be found in the printed page. ...
    • Data about metadata: beating the Metamap into shape

      Turner, James M.; Breitenstein, Mikel (2004)
      The MetaMap presents information about metadata standards, sets, and initiatives (MSSIs) in the form of a subway map. The MSSIs are represented as stations on lines having themes. Users can learn about MSSIs of interest to them by navigating around the map and clicking on points of interest to get more information about them. The map is constructed using Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), a recommendation of the World Wide Web Consortium. Versions in number of languages are available, and more are being built; however, since funding has run out, the mapâ s future is uncertain. This paper discusses the classification of metadata and design issues surrounding representation of this in the form of a subway map. Finally, paths for development of the MetaMap are indicated.
    • Data File, Public Use: Public Libraries Survey: Fiscal Year 2001 (Revised)

      Kroe, Elaine; U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics (U. S. Department of Education, NCES 2003â 398, 2003)
      The Public Libraries Survey is conducted annually by the National Center for Education Statistics through the Federal-State Cooperative System for Public Library Data. The data are collected by a network of state data coordinators appointed by the chief officers of state library agencies in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the outlying areas. Data are collected on population of legal service area, service outlets, public service hours, library materials, total circulation, circulation of children's materials, reference transactions, library visits, children's program attendance, electronic services and information, staff, operating income, operating expenditures, capital outlay, and more.
    • Data Models for Knowledge Organization Tools: Evolution and Perspectives

      Cordeiro, Maria Inês; Slavic, Aida (Ergon Verlag, 2002)
      This paper focuses on the need for knowledge organization (KO) tools, such as library classifications, thesauri and subject heading systems, to be fully disclosed and available in the open network environment. The authors look at the place and value of traditional library knowledge organization tools in relation to the technical environment and expectations of the Semantic Web. Future requirements in this context are explored, stressing the need for KO systems to support semantic interoperability. In order to be fully shareable KO tools need to be reframed and reshaped in terms of conceptual and data models. The authors suggest that some useful approaches to this already exist in methodological and technical developments within the fields of ontology modelling and lexicographic and terminological data interchange.
    • Data Models for Knowledge Organization Tools: Evolution and Perspectives

      Cordeiro, Maria Inês; Slavic, Aida; López-Huertas, Marí­a J. (Ergon Verlag, 2002)
      This paper focuses on the need for knowledge organization (KO) tools, such as library classifications, thesauri and subject heading systems, to be fully disclosed and available in the open network environment. The authors look at the place and value of traditional library knowledge organization tools in relation to the technical environment and expectations of the Semantic Web. Future requirements in this context are explored, stressing the need for KO systems to support semantic interoperability. In order to be fully shareable KO tools need to be reframed and reshaped in terms of conceptual and data models. The authors suggest that some useful approaches to this already exist in methodological and technical developments within the fields of ontology modelling and lexicographic and terminological data interchange.
    • The Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Hierarchy and its Antithesis

      Bernstein, Jay H.; Jacob, Elin K.; Kwasnik, Barbara (2009)
      The now taken-for-granted notion that data lead to information, which leads to knowledge, which in turn leads to wisdom was first specified in detail by R. L. Ackoff in 1988. The Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom hierarchy is based on filtration, reduction, and transformation. Besides being causal and hierarchical, the scheme is pyramidal, in that data are plentiful while wisdom is almost nonexistent. Ackoffâ s formula linking these terms together this way permits us to ask what the opposite of knowledge is and whether analogous principles of hierarchy, process, and pyramiding apply to it. The inversion of the Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom hierarchy produces a series of opposing terms (including misinformation, error, ignorance, and stupidity) but not exactly a chain or a pyramid. Examining the connections between these phenomena contributes to our understanding of the contours and limits of knowledge.
    • Database design, and information storage and retrieval - Module 4

      Talagala, Deepali (2002)
      ICT for Library and Information Professionals: A Training Package for Developing Countries (ICTLIP) edited by Andrew Large, McGill University, and published by the Information and Informatics Unit, UNESCO Bangkok, Thailand, consists of 6 modules, namely, Module 1: Introduction to information and communication technologies; Module 2: Introduction to integrated library systems; Module 3: Information seeking in an electronic environment; Module 4: Database design, and information storage and retrieval; Module 5: The Internet as an information resource; and Module 6: Web page concept and design: getting a web site up and running. This is Module 4 Database design, and information storage and retrieval (Teacher's Guide) by Deepali Talagala. Module 4 concerns the concepts of database designing using WinISIS, and the storage and retrieval of information. By the end of the Module, students should: * Be able to use the basic features of WinISIS *Be able to identify the principles of database designing *Be able to design and use a sample database *Understand the technological features *Know how to use
    • Date restricted queries in web search engines

      Lewandowski, Dirk (2004)
      This is a preprint of an article published in Online Information Review 28(2004)6, 420-427. Search engines usually offer a date restricted search on their advanced search pages. But determining the actual update of a web page is not without problems. We conduct a study testing date restricted queries on the search engines Google, Teoma and Yahoo!. We find that these searches fail to work properly in the examined engines. We discuss implications of this for further research and search engine development.
    • The Day the world changed: Implications for archival, library, and information science education

      Cox, Richard J.; Biagini, Mary K.; Carbo, Toni; Debons, Tony; Detlefsen, Ellen; Griffiths, Jose-Marie; King, Don; Robins, David; Thompson, Richard; Tomer, Chris; et al. (University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 2001-12)
      The terrorist attacks of September 11th on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon have had profound implications for many aspects of American and global society. This essay explores the many implications for library and information science schools educating the next generation of information professionals. The essay considers an array of opinions by the faculty located in one such school regarding how to reflect on the aftermath of the attacks for basic aspects of teaching, research, and curriculum design in library and information science schools. Topics examined include disaster preparedness and recovery, knowledge management, workplace design and location, technology and the human dimension, ethics and information policy, information security, information economics, memorializing and documenting the terrorist attacks, the role of the Internet, and preservation.
    • DCC Digital Curation Manual Instalment on Open Source for Digital Curation

      McHugh, Andrew (2005-08)
      Instalment on the role of open source software within the digital curation lifecycle. Describes a range of explicit digital curation application areas for open source, some examples of existing uses of open source software, a selection of open source applications of possible interest to the digital curator, some quantifiable statistics illustrating the value of open source software and some advice and pointers for institutions planning on introducing these technologies into their own information infrastructures. Includes Bibliography and Glossary
    • A Decision-Theoretic Approach to Data Mining

      Elovici, Yuval; Braha, Dan (2003)
      In this paper, we develop a decision-theoretic framework for evaluating data mining systems, which employ classification methods, in terms of their utility in decision-making. The decision-theoretic model provides an economic perspective on the value of â extracted knowledge,â in terms of its payoff to the organization, and suggests a wide range of decision problems that arise from this point of view. The relation between the quality of a data mining system and the amount of investment that the decision maker is willing to make is formalized. We propose two ways by which independent data mining systems can be combined and show that the combined data mining system can be used in the decision-making process of the organization to increase payoff. Examples are provided to illustrate the various concepts, and several ways by which the proposed framework can be extended are discussed.
    • Defining Fundamentals and Meeting Expectations: Trends in LIS Education in Australia

      Harvey, Ross; Higgins, Susan Ellen (IOS Press, 2003)
      Library and information studies education in Australia is characterised by unresolved tensions, some of which have persisted for several decades. Among its characteristics and conflicts are a multi-tiered system of qualification, a high number of schools per capita with a wide range of discipline affiliations, a wide acceptance of distance learning, pressure for curriculum review, and the perceived need for a national approach to planning for the profession.
    • Defining the digital divide: the role of e-Readiness indicators

      Luyt, Brendan (2006)
      Purpose: To show how e-readiness indicators, specifically the Networked Readiness Index, participate in the work of defining policy problems. Methodology/Approach: The article critically examines the Networked Readiness Index is terms of its presentation and its underlying model. It relies on an approach to policy analysis that views policy problems as socially constructed. Findings: E-readiness assessment tools purport to show how ready the nations of the world are to exploit the potential of new information and communication technologies. Yet they do more than that; being actively engaged in constructing policy problems. In the case of the NRI, the problem of the international digital divide is defined in a particular way that privileges certain interests while at the same time legitimatising its inclusion on the agenda of international organizations as a problem worthy of sustained attention. Practical Implications: The findings of the article suggest a need for alternative indicators that register the voices of a wider range of groups and could therefore create a more inclusive digital divide policy problem. Originality/value: Little critical (as opposed to technical) analysis of e-readiness indicators exits in the literature. By focusing on these tools, the article contributes to the debate surrounding the issue of the digital divide.
    • Deliberate bias in Knowledge Organization? 10th International ISKO Conference, Montréal Thursday, August 7, 2008

      Hjørland, Birger (2008-08)
      Considers the ideal of objectivity in science and the scientific ideals of representativity, testability and cumulativity on the one hand, and on the other hand norms of scholarship and knowledge organization based on rhetorical arguments which must be based on explicated values and goals.
    • Deliberate bias in Knowledge Organization? Advances in Knowledge Organization, vol. 11, 2008, pp. 256-261.

      Hjørland, Birger (ERGON Verlag, 2008)
      "Bias" is normally understood as a negatively loaded word, as something to be avoided or minimized, for example, in statistics or in knowledge organization. Recently Melanie Feinberg suggested, however, that "if we cannot eliminate bias, then we should instead attempt to be more responsible about it and explicitly decide on and defend the perspectives represented in information systems". This view is linked to related views: That knowledge organization is too much concerned with information retrieval and too much described in the mode of scientific discovery, as opposed to the mode of artifact design: "From the literary warrant of Hulme to the terminological warrant of the Classification Research Group (CRG), to Hjørland’s domain analysis, the classificationist seems like one who documents and compiles, and not one who actively shapes design." This paper examines these claims, which may be understood as questions about subjectivity and objectivity in classification and about positivism versus pragmatism in research. Is KO an objective and neutral activity? Can it be? Should it be? A dominant view has been that knowledge and KO should be understood as a passive reflection of an external order. This has been termed the mirror metaphor of knowledge and is related to empiricism and positivism. The opposite view - which is in accordance with both Feinberg and Hjørland - states that knowledge organization should be functional and thus reflecting given goals, purposes and values. It is related to pragmatism in philosophy.
    • Deliberate bias in Knowledge Organization? Powerpoint presentation from 10th International ISKO Conference, Montréal, 2008. Thursday, August 7, 2008

      Hjørland, Birger (2008-08)
      Considers the concept of "bias" in relation to views concerning objectivity and neutrality in Knowledge Organization.
    • Design and Development of Multimedia Based User Education Program: The Advantages of YouTube

      Ram, Shri; Paliwal, Nitin; Jaypee University of Information Technology, Solan (KBD Publications, 2013-04-23)
      User education is one of the essential activities of the library to optimize the use of library services. This paper discusses the use of multimedia based videos for the promotion of library services and activities with the help of emerging trends and technologies and the power of Web 2.0 especially YouTube. Through this paper, it is tried to demonstrate the procedural aspects of promoting user education through developing multimedia based user education program and utilizing the services of YouTube as media of marketing and communication at Jaypee University of Information Technology, Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India.
    • Design and Development of Multimedia Based User Education Program: The Advantages of YouTube

      Ram, Shri; Paliwal, Nitin; Jaypee University of Information Technology, Solan (KBD Publication, 2012-10-26)
      User education is one of the essential activities of the library to optimize the use of library services. This paper discusses the use of multimedia based videos for the promotion of library services and activities with the help of emerging trends and technologies and the power of Web 2.0 especially YouTube. Through this paper, it is tried to demonstrate the procedural aspects of promoting user education through developing multimedia based user education program and utilizing the services of YouTube as media of marketing and communication at Jaypee University of Information Technology, Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India.
    • Design and evaluation of a multi-agent collaborative Web mining system

      Chau, Michael; Zeng, Daniel; Chen, Hsinchun; Huang, Michael; Hendriawan, David (Elsevier, 2003-04)
      Most existing Web search tools work only with individual users and do not help a user benefit from previous search experiences of others. In this paper, we present the Collaborative Spider, a multi-agent system designed to provide post-retrieval analysis and enable across-user collaboration in Web search and mining. This system allows the user to annotate search sessions and share them with other users. We also report a user study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of this system. Our experimental findings show that subjectsâ search performance was degraded, compared to individual search scenarios in which users had no access to previous searches, when they had access to a limited number (e.g., 1 or 2) of earlier search sessions done by other users. However, search performance improved significantly when subjects had access to more search sessions. This indicates that gain from collaboration through collaborative Web searching and analysis does not outweigh the overhead of browsing and comprehending other usersâ past searches until a certain number of shared sessions have been reached. In this paper, we also catalog and analyze several different types of user collaboration behavior observed in the context of Web mining.