Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKatz, J. Sylvan
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Diana
dc.date.accessioned2002-07-29T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:21:34Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.date.submitted2002-07-29en_US
dc.identifier.citationBibliometric indicators for national systems of innovation 1998,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105206
dc.description.abstractIn bibliometric data lie opportunities to develop indicators relevant to central concerns of new theories of innovation, specifically networks within and between national systems, and variety and diversity of capability. The data can make a unique contribution to pictures compiled from multiple sources, providing an unrivalled objective, disaggregated and internationally comparable time series signature of networks and capabilities. In this paper, we present what we call systemic bibliometric indicators to distinguish our disaggregated, network-focused, time series approach from classical bibliometrics. On average, the British innovation system participates in 9% of the publications produced by the global innovation system and 28.5% of those publications involving an EU institution. Its participation is approximately 20% greater than the German innovation system and 70% greater than the French system. UK innovation system papers have slightly less impact on the global innovation system than US innovation system papers but more impact than any of the other innovation systems we have examined. The growth in impact of UK research on the global world-wide research system is the same as the Germany system, less than the US system and greater than the remaining innovation systems. The distribution of the top twenty scientific subfields world-wide is quite different from the distribution in the global system and other innovation systems. Five of the worldâ s top twenty subfields (applied physics, condensed matter physics, analytical chemistry, physiology and cardiovascular systems) are not ranked in the top twenty UK subfields. The size distribution of scientific subfields suggests that the British innovation system has its own unique characteristics.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectBibliometricsen_US
dc.subjectScience Technology Studiesen_US
dc.titleBibliometric indicators for national systems of innovationen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T10:46:53Z
html.description.abstractIn bibliometric data lie opportunities to develop indicators relevant to central concerns of new theories of innovation, specifically networks within and between national systems, and variety and diversity of capability. The data can make a unique contribution to pictures compiled from multiple sources, providing an unrivalled objective, disaggregated and internationally comparable time series signature of networks and capabilities. In this paper, we present what we call systemic bibliometric indicators to distinguish our disaggregated, network-focused, time series approach from classical bibliometrics. On average, the British innovation system participates in 9% of the publications produced by the global innovation system and 28.5% of those publications involving an EU institution. Its participation is approximately 20% greater than the German innovation system and 70% greater than the French system. UK innovation system papers have slightly less impact on the global innovation system than US innovation system papers but more impact than any of the other innovation systems we have examined. The growth in impact of UK research on the global world-wide research system is the same as the Germany system, less than the US system and greater than the remaining innovation systems. The distribution of the top twenty scientific subfields world-wide is quite different from the distribution in the global system and other innovation systems. Five of the worldâ s top twenty subfields (applied physics, condensed matter physics, analytical chemistry, physiology and cardiovascular systems) are not ranked in the top twenty UK subfields. The size distribution of scientific subfields suggests that the British innovation system has its own unique characteristics.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Idea12.pdf
Size:
256.5Kb
Format:
PDF
Thumbnail
Name:
Idea12.txt
Size:
134.2Kb
Format:
Text file

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record