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dc.contributor.authorFallis, Donen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-20T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:22:16Z
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-10-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationEpistemic Value Theory and Information Ethics 2004, 14(1) Minds and Machinesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105254
dc.description.abstractThree of the major issues in information ethics—intellectual property, speech regulation, and privacy—concern the morality of restricting people’s access to certain information. Consequently, policies in these areas have a significant impact on the amount and types of knowledge that people acquire. As a result, epistemic considerations are critical to the ethics of information policy decisions (cf. Mill 1978 [1859]). The fact that information ethics is a part of the philosophy of information highlights this important connection with epistemology. In this paper, I illustrate how a value-theoretic approach to epistemology can help to clarify these major issues in information ethics. However, I also identify several open questions about epistemic values that need to be answered before we will be able to evaluate the epistemic consequences of many information policies.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.subjectPhilosophyen_US
dc.subjectSocial Epistemologyen_US
dc.subjectInformation Ethicsen_US
dc.subject.otherepistemic value theoryen_US
dc.subject.otherepistemologyen_US
dc.subject.otherinformation ethicsen_US
dc.subject.otherintellectual propertyen_US
dc.subject.otherphilosophy of informationen_US
dc.subject.otherprivacyen_US
dc.subject.othersocial epistemologyen_US
dc.subject.otherspeech regulationen_US
dc.titleEpistemic Value Theory and Information Ethicsen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (On-line/Unpaginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalMinds and Machinesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-18T21:36:39Z
html.description.abstractThree of the major issues in information ethics—intellectual property, speech regulation, and privacy—concern the morality of restricting people’s access to certain information. Consequently, policies in these areas have a significant impact on the amount and types of knowledge that people acquire. As a result, epistemic considerations are critical to the ethics of information policy decisions (cf. Mill 1978 [1859]). The fact that information ethics is a part of the philosophy of information highlights this important connection with epistemology. In this paper, I illustrate how a value-theoretic approach to epistemology can help to clarify these major issues in information ethics. However, I also identify several open questions about epistemic values that need to be answered before we will be able to evaluate the epistemic consequences of many information policies.


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