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dc.contributor.authorColeman, Anita Sundaram*
dc.date.accessioned2006-03-10T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:25:15Z
dc.date.issued2006-03en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-03-10en_US
dc.identifier.citationSelf-Archiving and the Copyright Transfer Agreements of ISI-Ranked Library and Information Science Journals 2006-03,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105428
dc.description.abstractThis paper has been published in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (. A study of Thomson-Scientific ISI ranked Library and Information Science (LIS) journals (n=52) is reported. The study examined the stances of publishers as expressed in the Copyright Transfer Agreements (CTAs) of the journals, towards self-archiving, the practice of depositing digital copies of one's works in an OAI-compliant open access repository. 62 % (32) do not make their CTAs available on the open web; 38 % (20) do. Of the 38 % that do make CTAs available, two are open access journals. Of the 62 % that do not have a publicly available CTA, 40 % are silent about self-archiving. Even among the 20 journal CTAs publicly available there is a high level of ambiguity. Closer examination augmented by publisher policy documents on copyright, self-archiving, and instructions to authors, reveal that only five, 10% of the ISI-ranked LIS journals in the study, actually prohibit self-archiving by publisher rule. Copyright is a moving target but publishers appear to be acknowledging that copyright and open access can co-exist in scholarly journal publishing. The ambivalence of LIS journal publishers provides unique opportunities to members of the community. Authors can self-archive in open access archives. A society-led global scholarly communication consortium can engage in the strategic building of the LIS information commons. Aggregating OAI-compliant archives and developing disciplinary-specific library services for an LIS commons has the potential to increase the field's research impact and visibility. It may also ameliorate its own scholarly communication and publishing systems and serve as a model for others. Author's addendum: This preprint incorrectly states that ISI-SSCI was source (p. 9-10). Actual final source was JCR 2004 with SSCI serving as a cross-check.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScholarly Communicationen_US
dc.titleSelf-Archiving and the Copyright Transfer Agreements of ISI-Ranked Library and Information Science Journalsen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-27T23:46:58Z
html.description.abstractThis paper has been published in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (. A study of Thomson-Scientific ISI ranked Library and Information Science (LIS) journals (n=52) is reported. The study examined the stances of publishers as expressed in the Copyright Transfer Agreements (CTAs) of the journals, towards self-archiving, the practice of depositing digital copies of one's works in an OAI-compliant open access repository. 62 % (32) do not make their CTAs available on the open web; 38 % (20) do. Of the 38 % that do make CTAs available, two are open access journals. Of the 62 % that do not have a publicly available CTA, 40 % are silent about self-archiving. Even among the 20 journal CTAs publicly available there is a high level of ambiguity. Closer examination augmented by publisher policy documents on copyright, self-archiving, and instructions to authors, reveal that only five, 10% of the ISI-ranked LIS journals in the study, actually prohibit self-archiving by publisher rule. Copyright is a moving target but publishers appear to be acknowledging that copyright and open access can co-exist in scholarly journal publishing. The ambivalence of LIS journal publishers provides unique opportunities to members of the community. Authors can self-archive in open access archives. A society-led global scholarly communication consortium can engage in the strategic building of the LIS information commons. Aggregating OAI-compliant archives and developing disciplinary-specific library services for an LIS commons has the potential to increase the field's research impact and visibility. It may also ameliorate its own scholarly communication and publishing systems and serve as a model for others. Author's addendum: This preprint incorrectly states that ISI-SSCI was source (p. 9-10). Actual final source was JCR 2004 with SSCI serving as a cross-check.


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