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dc.contributor.authorOlson, Hope
dc.contributor.editorLussky, Joanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-20T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:26:52Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-10-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationCultural Infrastructure: The Story of How Classification Came to Shape Our Lives 2007,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105521
dc.description.abstractClassification is ubiquitous. It is present in almost every aspect of your life. There is the classification of your race on your birth certificate and, ultimately, the classification of the cause on your death certificate. In between you may be paid according to your job classification and the American Time Use Survey Activity Lexicon will classify how you spend your unpaid time. We also have classifications for mental disorders, for planets, for hurricanes, even for snowflakes. Of course we are most familiar with bibliographic classifications, the Dewey Decimal Classification, the Library of Congress Classification, and the Universal Decimal Classification paramount among them. What does this ubiquity mean for us and where did it come from? This paper will trace a brief history of the common structure of these classifications and their manifestations and ramifications in our world.
dc.format.mimetypedocen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
dc.subject.otherclassificationen_US
dc.subject.otherhistoryen_US
dc.subject.othertheory of LISen_US
dc.titleCultural Infrastructure: The Story of How Classification Came to Shape Our Livesen_US
dc.typeExtended Abstracten_US
html.description.abstractClassification is ubiquitous. It is present in almost every aspect of your life. There is the classification of your race on your birth certificate and, ultimately, the classification of the cause on your death certificate. In between you may be paid according to your job classification and the American Time Use Survey Activity Lexicon will classify how you spend your unpaid time. We also have classifications for mental disorders, for planets, for hurricanes, even for snowflakes. Of course we are most familiar with bibliographic classifications, the Dewey Decimal Classification, the Library of Congress Classification, and the Universal Decimal Classification paramount among them. What does this ubiquity mean for us and where did it come from? This paper will trace a brief history of the common structure of these classifications and their manifestations and ramifications in our world.


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