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dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorNorris, April
dc.contributor.editorColeman, Anitaen_US
dc.contributor.editorMalone, Cherylen_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-02-03T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:27:08Z
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-02-03en_US
dc.identifier.citationCrying Wolf: An examination and reconsideration of the perception of crisis in LIS 2005, 46(4):280-298 Journal of Education for Library and Information Scienceen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105542
dc.description.abstractRecent discussions of education for library professionals have strongly criticized the state of most Library and Information Science (LIS) schools, which are portrayed as techno-centric, male-dominated, and out of touch with the needs of practitioners. In the present essay we examine the major claims for a new crisis in LIS education and conclude that the data do not support most of the popular criticisms made of this field. Instead, the notion of crisis is best understood as indicative of a moment of change and an opportunity to significantly affect the long-term future of the field.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherALISEen_US
dc.subjectLibrary and Information Science Educationen_US
dc.subject.othereducationen_US
dc.subject.othergenderen_US
dc.subject.othercurriculumen_US
dc.subject.othercrisisen_US
dc.subject.otherlibrary scienceen_US
dc.titleCrying Wolf: An examination and reconsideration of the perception of crisis in LISen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Education for Library and Information Scienceen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-23T12:03:17Z
html.description.abstractRecent discussions of education for library professionals have strongly criticized the state of most Library and Information Science (LIS) schools, which are portrayed as techno-centric, male-dominated, and out of touch with the needs of practitioners. In the present essay we examine the major claims for a new crisis in LIS education and conclude that the data do not support most of the popular criticisms made of this field. Instead, the notion of crisis is best understood as indicative of a moment of change and an opportunity to significantly affect the long-term future of the field.


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