Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLeydesdorff, Loet
dc.date.accessioned2002-08-06T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:31:09Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.date.submitted2002-08-06en_US
dc.identifier.citationTechnology and Culture: The Dissemination and the Potential 'Lock-in' of New Technologies 2001, 4(3) Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105646
dc.description.abstractHow do technological innovations change the patterns of their cultural diffusion in socio-economic networks? Cellular automata enable us to show Arthur's (1988) model of a potential 'lock-in' of a new technology in terms of dominant colours on the screen. The 'lock-in' effects can be combined with local learning, network effects, and more complex dynamics. Recursive and interaction terms can thus be declared separately in the construction of a simple, but non-linear model of technological development and innovation. This enables us to specify conditions for a 'break-out' or a 'deadlock' between competing technologies. Using Axelrod's (1997) simulation model of 'cultural dissemination' as another network effect, it will be shown that the cultural assimilation of a new technology can co-evolve with the 'lock-in' of a dominant technology. This effect can be annihilated by the further development of the communication with an emerging dimension. Implications for technology and innovation policies will be specified.
dc.format.mimetypetext/htmlen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectScience Technology Studiesen_US
dc.subject.othercultureen_US
dc.subject.otherdisseminationen_US
dc.subject.otherinnovationen_US
dc.subject.otherlock-inen_US
dc.subject.othertechnologyen_US
dc.titleTechnology and Culture: The Dissemination and the Potential 'Lock-in' of New Technologiesen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (On-line/Unpaginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulationen_US
html.description.abstractHow do technological innovations change the patterns of their cultural diffusion in socio-economic networks? Cellular automata enable us to show Arthur's (1988) model of a potential 'lock-in' of a new technology in terms of dominant colours on the screen. The 'lock-in' effects can be combined with local learning, network effects, and more complex dynamics. Recursive and interaction terms can thus be declared separately in the construction of a simple, but non-linear model of technological development and innovation. This enables us to specify conditions for a 'break-out' or a 'deadlock' between competing technologies. Using Axelrod's (1997) simulation model of 'cultural dissemination' as another network effect, it will be shown that the cultural assimilation of a new technology can co-evolve with the 'lock-in' of a dominant technology. This effect can be annihilated by the further development of the communication with an emerging dimension. Implications for technology and innovation policies will be specified.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
5.html
Size:
86.72Kb
Format:
HTML

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record