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dc.contributor.authorDillon, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-17T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:33:40Z
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-07-17en_US
dc.identifier.citationReading from paper versus screens: a critical review of the empirical literature 1992, 35(10):1297-1326 Ergonomicsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105748
dc.description.abstractThis item is not the definitive copy. Please use the following citation when referencing this material: Dillon, A. (1992) Reading from paper versus screens: a critical review of the empirical literature. Ergonomics, 35(10), 1297-1326. Abstract: The advent of widespread computer use in general and increasing developments in the domain of hypertext in particular have increased awareness of the issue of reading electronic text. To date the literature has been dominated by reference to work on overcoming speed deficits resulting from poor image quality but an emerging literature reveals a more complex set of variables at work. The present review considers the differences between the media in terms of outcomes and processes of reading and concludes that single variable explanations are insufficient to capture the range of issues involved in reading from screens.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectHuman Computer Interactionen_US
dc.subject.otherVisual processingen_US
dc.subject.otherElectronic texten_US
dc.subject.otherReader performanceen_US
dc.titleReading from paper versus screens: a critical review of the empirical literatureen_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalErgonomicsen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T14:08:41Z
html.description.abstractThis item is not the definitive copy. Please use the following citation when referencing this material: Dillon, A. (1992) Reading from paper versus screens: a critical review of the empirical literature. Ergonomics, 35(10), 1297-1326. Abstract: The advent of widespread computer use in general and increasing developments in the domain of hypertext in particular have increased awareness of the issue of reading electronic text. To date the literature has been dominated by reference to work on overcoming speed deficits resulting from poor image quality but an emerging literature reveals a more complex set of variables at work. The present review considers the differences between the media in terms of outcomes and processes of reading and concludes that single variable explanations are insufficient to capture the range of issues involved in reading from screens.


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