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dc.contributor.authorRobbin, Alice
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-01T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:34:45Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.date.submitted2008-04-01en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe loss of personal privacy and its consequences for social research. 2001, 28(5):493-527 Journal of Government Informationen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105807
dc.description.abstractThis article chronicles more than 30 years of public opinion, politics, and law and policy on privacy and confidentiality that have had far-reaching consequences for access by the social research community to administrative and statistical records produced by government. A hostile political environment, public controversy over the decennial census long form, media coverage, and public fears about the vast accumulations of personal information by the private sector were catalysts for a recent proposal by the U.S. Bureau of the Census that would have significantly altered the contents of the 2000 census Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS). These events show clearly that science does not operate independently from the political sphere but may be transformed by a political world where powerful interests lead government agencies to assume responsibility for privacy protection that can result in reducing access to statistical data.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSociologyen_US
dc.subjectInformation Scienceen_US
dc.subjectGovernment Informationen_US
dc.subjectInformation Ethicsen_US
dc.subject.otherPersonal privacyen_US
dc.subject.otherConfidentialityen_US
dc.subject.otherInformation privacyen_US
dc.subject.otherData accessen_US
dc.subject.otherData sharingen_US
dc.subject.otherDecennial censusen_US
dc.subject.otherPUMSen_US
dc.subject.otherPublic use microdata sampleen_US
dc.titleThe loss of personal privacy and its consequences for social research.en_US
dc.typeJournal Article (Paginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Government Informationen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T14:13:20Z
html.description.abstractThis article chronicles more than 30 years of public opinion, politics, and law and policy on privacy and confidentiality that have had far-reaching consequences for access by the social research community to administrative and statistical records produced by government. A hostile political environment, public controversy over the decennial census long form, media coverage, and public fears about the vast accumulations of personal information by the private sector were catalysts for a recent proposal by the U.S. Bureau of the Census that would have significantly altered the contents of the 2000 census Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS). These events show clearly that science does not operate independently from the political sphere but may be transformed by a political world where powerful interests lead government agencies to assume responsibility for privacy protection that can result in reducing access to statistical data.


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