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dc.contributor.authorCox, Richard J.*
dc.contributor.authorBiagini, Mary K.*
dc.contributor.authorCarbo, Toni*
dc.contributor.authorDebons, Tony*
dc.contributor.authorDetlefsen, Ellen*
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Jose-Marie*
dc.contributor.authorKing, Don*
dc.contributor.authorRobins, David*
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Richard*
dc.contributor.authorTomer, Chris*
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Martin*
dc.contributor.editorValauskas, Edward J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2006-07-11T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:37:20Z
dc.date.issued2001-12en_US
dc.date.submitted2006-07-11en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Day the world changed: Implications for archival, library, and information science education 2001-12, 6(12) First Mondayen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/105956
dc.description.abstractThe terrorist attacks of September 11th on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon have had profound implications for many aspects of American and global society. This essay explores the many implications for library and information science schools educating the next generation of information professionals. The essay considers an array of opinions by the faculty located in one such school regarding how to reflect on the aftermath of the attacks for basic aspects of teaching, research, and curriculum design in library and information science schools. Topics examined include disaster preparedness and recovery, knowledge management, workplace design and location, technology and the human dimension, ethics and information policy, information security, information economics, memorializing and documenting the terrorist attacks, the role of the Internet, and preservation.
dc.format.mimetypetext/htmlen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Illinois at Chicago Libraryen_US
dc.subjectLibrary Scienceen_US
dc.subjectInformation Scienceen_US
dc.subjectArchivesen_US
dc.subjectLibrary and Information Science Educationen_US
dc.titleThe Day the world changed: Implications for archival, library, and information science educationen_US
dc.typeJournal (On-line/Unpaginated)en_US
dc.identifier.journalFirst Mondayen_US
html.description.abstractThe terrorist attacks of September 11th on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon have had profound implications for many aspects of American and global society. This essay explores the many implications for library and information science schools educating the next generation of information professionals. The essay considers an array of opinions by the faculty located in one such school regarding how to reflect on the aftermath of the attacks for basic aspects of teaching, research, and curriculum design in library and information science schools. Topics examined include disaster preparedness and recovery, knowledge management, workplace design and location, technology and the human dimension, ethics and information policy, information security, information economics, memorializing and documenting the terrorist attacks, the role of the Internet, and preservation.


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