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dc.contributor.authorLee, Hur-Li
dc.contributor.authorGu, Kangnan
dc.contributor.authorShah, Zarina Mohd
dc.contributor.editorLussky, Joanen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-20T00:00:01Z
dc.date.available2010-06-18T23:42:04Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2007-10-20en_US
dc.identifier.citationReflecting and Shaping World Views: Historical Treatments in Classification 2007,en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/106177
dc.description.abstractExamples of historical treatments in classification and categorization are abundant in our lives. In American pop culture, we often use decades as a framework to define, understand and interpret fashions, ideas, events, and issues. The 1960s, for example, represent to many Americans a time commonly associated with youth and rebellion and the first vivid images from the decade that come to mind include rock â n roll music and hippies. Another example is the simple categorizations applied by the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) on their Website (http://www.nmwa.org/collection/) to organize its permanent collection into: the 16th-17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. In todayâ s widely used library classifications (e.g., Dewey Decimal Classification and Library of Congress Classification), historical treatments have always been a standard feature, seen throughout the schedules (e.g., 372.904 for â elementary education in the 20th centuryâ in DDC and PN720 for â literary history in Renaissanceâ in LCC).
dc.format.mimetypedocen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectClassificationen_US
dc.subject.otherhistorical treatmenten_US
dc.subject.otherarten_US
dc.subject.othercategorizationen_US
dc.titleReflecting and Shaping World Views: Historical Treatments in Classificationen_US
dc.typeConference Posteren_US
html.description.abstractExamples of historical treatments in classification and categorization are abundant in our lives. In American pop culture, we often use decades as a framework to define, understand and interpret fashions, ideas, events, and issues. The 1960s, for example, represent to many Americans a time commonly associated with youth and rebellion and the first vivid images from the decade that come to mind include rock â n roll music and hippies. Another example is the simple categorizations applied by the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) on their Website (http://www.nmwa.org/collection/) to organize its permanent collection into: the 16th-17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. In todayâ s widely used library classifications (e.g., Dewey Decimal Classification and Library of Congress Classification), historical treatments have always been a standard feature, seen throughout the schedules (e.g., 372.904 for â elementary education in the 20th centuryâ in DDC and PN720 for â literary history in Renaissanceâ in LCC).


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