• Coyote Papers 23: Proceedings of ALC 14

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y.; De La Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela; Powell, John; Mihajlović, Kristina; Irizarry-Figueroa, Luis A.; Pescaru, George-Michael; Hafner, Florian (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • The Feminization of French Profession Nouns

      Yi, Irene; University of California, Berkeley (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • The Pragmatic Implication of Speakers’ Affirmative Attitude in Cantonese Utterance Particle Ge3

      Law, Ka Fai; Brigham Young University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • The FLEECE and GOOSE Vowels in Tyneside English: Accent Levelling and Morphological Conditioning

      Krug, Andreas; Newcastle University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • Identity investment in the pedagogy of identity texts: A critical review

      Hiba B., Ibrahim; York University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • A new category for Kiksht ideophones

      Nelson-Greene, Pearl; Johnson, Isaac; Duncan, Philip T.; University of Kansas (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • A German expletive gone unnoticed? Some notes on (obligatorily) left-peripheral so

      Catasso, Nicholas; Bergische Universität Wuppertal (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • CLI and Cognitive Control in the L3 Initial State

      Brown, Megan M.; Boston University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • Coyote Papers 23: Frontmatter and TOC

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y.; De La Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela; Powell, John; Mihajlović, Kristina; Irizarry-Figueroa, Luis A.; Pescaru, George-Michael; Hafner, Florian; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2021)
    • Coyote Papers 22: Frontmatter and TOC

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y; Powell, John; De la Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
    • Escaping siloed phonology: Framing Irish lenition in Emergent Grammar

      McCullough, Kerry; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      Irish displays a complex mutation system in which regular phonological alternations are sensitive to arbitrary morphological information. The Emergent Grammar (EG) model is well-suited to address this phenomenon. This paper details how the model's technology accounts for the phonological regularity and morphological opacity of lenition in Irish.
    • Resistance, Consciousness, and Filipina Hip Hop Identity: A Phonological Analysis

      Tseng, Serene; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      In this paper, I investigate the phonology and Hip Hop Language of two Filipina American rappers, Ruby Ibarra and Rocky Rivera, and how they express their understandings of identity and language and race, all in the context of Hip Hop and Asian America.
    • Dialectal, Gender-Based, and Cross-Generational Variation in Negev Arabic Spatial Representations

      Cerqueglini, Letizia; Tel Aviv University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      Space is a fundamental domain of human thinking, universally experienced, yet culturally specific. I describe variations in linguistic and cognitive projective spatial representations (frames of reference) across dialects, genders, and age groups among the Bedouin Arabs of the Negev. Their tribes preserve a unique, culture-specific system of spatial representations.
    • Low-proficiency L2 Collaborative writing to enhance individual writing and grammatical accuracy

      Consolini, Carla H.; Soto-Lucena, Irene; University of Oregon; University of Pittsburgh (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      [abstract pending]
    • A-Movement: Successive Cyclic or One Fell Swoop?

      Mizuguchi, Manabu; Toyo University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      This paper discusses A-movement, focusing on its successive cyclicity, and argues that it can be both successive cyclic and non-successive cyclic. I claim that whether A-movement is successive cyclic or not depends on how Merge applies, proposing that the structure-building operation plays a key role in determining the successive cyclicity.
    • Immediate-local MERGE as pair-Merge

      Omune, Jun; Kansai Gaidai University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      One of the structure-building operations—pair-Merge/adjunction—is conceptually implied to be dispensable in the minimalist MERGE model. This article proposes that immediate-local MERGE (IL-MERGE)—extremely local application of internal MERGE—yields the asymmetric property of adjunction. IL-MERGE forms {a, {a, b}} that is equivalent of <a, b> built by pair-Merge.
    • Unifying Labeling under Minimal Search in "Single-" and "Multiple-Specifier" Configurations

      Epstein, Samuel D.; Kitahara, Hisatsugu; Seely, T. Daniel; The University of Michigan; Keio University; Eastern Michigan University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      Building on recent proposals of Chomsky (2013, 2015), we explore a definition of minimal search that allows an elegant (since simple) analysis of multiple nominative subjects in Japanese, and the absence of such subjects in English. We propose an analysis yielding these results unifying labeling under minimal search in single- and multiple-specifier configurations.
    • Coyote Papers 22: Proceedings of ALC 13

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y; Powell, John; De la Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela; Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y; Powell, John; De la Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2020)
      Coyote Papers Volume 22 served as the proceedings for the Arizona Linguistics Circle 13. This is the full volume.
    • Reconstruction and Linearity in Long-Distance Cleft Constructions

      Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kizu, Mika; University of British Columbia; McGill University; University of Durham (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle, 2000)
      This paper is concerned with cleft constructions and reconstruction effects in English and Japanese. Japanese cleft constructions involve two different syntactic dependencies, movement and deletion. This assumption explains facts that have not been reported in the literature. The reflexive pronoun in (la) and the reciprocal pronoun in (lb) in the focus phrase can be bound either by the higher subject or by the lower subject in the presupposition. In clear contrast, the lower subject in Japanese cleft constructions cannot bind anaphors in the focus phrase. In (2), only the higher subject can bind the anaphors in the focus phrase. What explains the contrast between (1) and (2)? We argue that an operator in Japanese moves from the position adjoined to the lower clause (tk in (3)), not from the thematic gap position (ek). It is shown that the dependency (ii) in (3) stems from movement, and (i) from deletion. Since Opk (or the focus phrase associated with it) reconstructs only to the position of tk, the anaphor can only be bound by the higher subject, Sallyi-Nom.