• CLI and Cognitive Control in the L3 Initial State

      Brown, Megan M.; Boston University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • The Pragmatic Implication of Speakers’ Affirmative Attitude in Cantonese Utterance Particle Ge3

      Law, Ka Fai; Brigham Young University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • A new category for Kiksht ideophones

      Nelson-Greene, Pearl; Johnson, Isaac; Duncan, Philip T.; University of Kansas (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • Coyote Papers 23: Frontmatter and TOC

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y.; De La Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela; Powell, John; Mihajlović, Kristina; Irizarry-Figueroa, Luis A.; Pescaru, George-Michael; Hafner, Florian; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • A German expletive gone unnoticed? Some notes on (obligatorily) left-peripheral so

      Catasso, Nicholas; Bergische Universität Wuppertal (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • Identity investment in the pedagogy of identity texts: A critical review

      Hiba B., Ibrahim; York University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • The Feminization of French Profession Nouns

      Yi, Irene; University of California, Berkeley (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • The FLEECE and GOOSE Vowels in Tyneside English: Accent Levelling and Morphological Conditioning

      Krug, Andreas; Newcastle University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • Coyote Papers 23: Proceedings of ALC 14

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y.; De La Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela; Powell, John; Mihajlović, Kristina; Irizarry-Figueroa, Luis A.; Pescaru, George-Michael; Hafner, Florian (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2021)
    • Immediate-local MERGE as pair-Merge

      Omune, Jun; Kansai Gaidai University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
      One of the structure-building operations—pair-Merge/adjunction—is conceptually implied to be dispensable in the minimalist MERGE model. This article proposes that immediate-local MERGE (IL-MERGE)—extremely local application of internal MERGE—yields the asymmetric property of adjunction. IL-MERGE forms {a, {a, b}} that is equivalent of <a, b> built by pair-Merge.
    • Escaping siloed phonology: Framing Irish lenition in Emergent Grammar

      McCullough, Kerry; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
      Irish displays a complex mutation system in which regular phonological alternations are sensitive to arbitrary morphological information. The Emergent Grammar (EG) model is well-suited to address this phenomenon. This paper details how the model's technology accounts for the phonological regularity and morphological opacity of lenition in Irish.
    • Low-proficiency L2 Collaborative writing to enhance individual writing and grammatical accuracy

      Consolini, Carla H.; Soto-Lucena, Irene; University of Oregon; University of Pittsburgh (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
      [abstract pending]
    • Dialectal, Gender-Based, and Cross-Generational Variation in Negev Arabic Spatial Representations

      Cerqueglini, Letizia; Tel Aviv University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
      Space is a fundamental domain of human thinking, universally experienced, yet culturally specific. I describe variations in linguistic and cognitive projective spatial representations (frames of reference) across dialects, genders, and age groups among the Bedouin Arabs of the Negev. Their tribes preserve a unique, culture-specific system of spatial representations.
    • Coyote Papers 22: Frontmatter and TOC

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y; Powell, John; De la Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
    • A-Movement: Successive Cyclic or One Fell Swoop?

      Mizuguchi, Manabu; Toyo University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
      This paper discusses A-movement, focusing on its successive cyclicity, and argues that it can be both successive cyclic and non-successive cyclic. I claim that whether A-movement is successive cyclic or not depends on how Merge applies, proposing that the structure-building operation plays a key role in determining the successive cyclicity.
    • Unifying Labeling under Minimal Search in "Single-" and "Multiple-Specifier" Configurations

      Epstein, Samuel D.; Kitahara, Hisatsugu; Seely, T. Daniel; The University of Michigan; Keio University; Eastern Michigan University (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
      Building on recent proposals of Chomsky (2013, 2015), we explore a definition of minimal search that allows an elegant (since simple) analysis of multiple nominative subjects in Japanese, and the absence of such subjects in English. We propose an analysis yielding these results unifying labeling under minimal search in single- and multiple-specifier configurations.
    • Resistance, Consciousness, and Filipina Hip Hop Identity: A Phonological Analysis

      Tseng, Serene; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
      In this paper, I investigate the phonology and Hip Hop Language of two Filipina American rappers, Ruby Ibarra and Rocky Rivera, and how they express their understandings of identity and language and race, all in the context of Hip Hop and Asian America.
    • Coyote Papers 22: Proceedings of ALC 13

      Nitschke, Remo; Romero Diaz, Damian Y; Powell, John; De la Cruz Sánchez, Gabriela (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2020)
    • Good Times, Bad Times: A keyword analysis of letters to shareholders of two Fortune 500 Banking Institutions

      Poole, Robert E.; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2013)
      This corpus-based keyword analysis study investigated the letters to the shareholders from two commercial banks, Bank of America and Citigroup, over a three-year period from 2008, 2009, and 2010. The letters were compiled to facilitate a diachronic assessment of profit/loss reporting from two prominent institutions over a time period in which the recession commenced, peaked, and concluded. To conduct the analysis on the node texts, two sets of reference corpora were compiled. The first reference corpus set consisted of the letters to shareholders from eight consistently high-performing corporations not within the commercial banking industry for each of the three years; the second reference corpus set consisted of the letters from the 10 banking institutions that also appeared in the Fortune 500 listings for the three period. The corpus-based analysis revealed that in years of low performance companies create messages that assert a vision and forward a strategy for ensuring future success while also deflecting responsibility for past failure. In contrast, when companies perform well, the keyword lists display a clear tendency of the company and the author to accept praise and responsibility for high performance.
    • Can Idioms Be Passivized?: Evidence from Online Processing

      Stone, Megan Schildmier; University of Arizona (University of Arizona Linguistics Circle (Tucson, Arizona), 2013)
      This paper presents the results of an experiment designed to access native speakers’ underlying grammatical knowledge concerning the passivizability of English Verb-Object (VO) idioms. Although it has long been noted that some VO idioms retain their idiomatic meaning in the passive while others do not (Katz & Postal 1964, et seq.), the source of this variation is unclear, and native speaker intuitions on a large number of idioms are not as clear cut as previous accounts might suggest. Taking as a starting point Folli and Harley’s (2007) hypothesis that there is a structural distinction between passivizable and nonpassivizable idioms, the current study tests one prediction of this hypothesis, namely that there should be a categorical distinction between the two types of idioms in the grammars of native speakers. The experimental results contradict this hypothesis, as evidenced by a normal distribution of response times to passive idioms. However, it is hypothesized that this online task is not appropriate to access the fine-tuned syntactico-semantic judgments underlying native speaker intuitions of idiom passivizability, due to the fact that the methodology employed here—a self-paced reading task—does not yield the expected results even for canonically passivizable and nonpassivizable idioms.