• About Aboutness: The Ethnographic Film "Reassemblage"

      Taylor, John (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1994)
    • About the Authors

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1996)
    • Adaptive Strategies in Changing Cultural Environments

      Martínez, James (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1980)
      A major theme in current anthropology is the study of adaptive strategies employed by man in changing environments. The environment is understood to consist of both natural and social forces which produce internal and external stresses on a cultural system. The system is composed of established adaptive strategies that are employed at any time. This paper is intended to present some observations on the integration process of a formerly independent system (a small Highland Mexican village) into a larger expanding system (urban Mexico City).
    • Agent-based models as behavioral laboratories for evolutionary anthropological research

      Premo, L. S.; Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 2006)
      Agent-based models can provide paleoanthropologists with a view of behavioral dynamics and site formation processes as they unfold in digital caricatures of past societies and paleoenvironments. This paper argues that the agent-based methodology has the most to offer when used to conduct controlled, repeatable experiments within the context of behavioral laboratories. To illustrate the potential of this decidedly heuristic approach, I provide a case study of a simple agent-based model currently being used to investigate the evolution of Plio-Pleistocene hominin food sharing in East Africa. The results of this null model demonstrate that certain levels of ecological patchiness can facilitate the evolution of even simple food sharing strategies among equally simple hominin foragers. More generally, they demonstrate the potential that agent-based models possess for helping historical scientists act as their own informants as to what could have happened in the past.
    • Anthropological Perspectives on Infanticide

      Brewis, Alexandra A. (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1992)
      Infanticidal behavior has been very common through-out human history. It is suggested that progenicidal behavior, whether consciously or unconsciously practiced, be defined and considered within a cultural, ecological and historical matrix in anthropological studies. Sociobiological and materialist interpretive models are considered too extremist by many anthropologists. Both approaches have an inherent tendency to treat "culture" as a subsidiary variable in infanticide, rather than as encompassing progenicidal phenomena and strategies. A useful conceptual framework with which to approach data collection is one where individuals negotiate progenicidal and child care decision-making within a sociocultural, ecological, technological, demographic and economic framework.
    • Anthropologist as Anti-Christ: Positioning and Reciprocity in San Miguel Acatán, Guatemala

      Jafek, Timothy B. (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1998)
      The accusation by some villagers that I was an Anti-Christ provides an opportunity to reflect on the production of anthropological knowledge. The production of knowledge by anthropologists must not only take into account the personal characteristics of the anthropologist but also the ways in which the culture the anthropologist studies classifies that anthropologist, thereby making available to him or her certain ways of knowing. I my case, as an unmarried man with no visible means of economic support, I appeared similar to others, like Earthlords, and priests, who offered villagers Faustian bargains. The deals' dangers lay in the fact that the exchanges occurred outside of the moral and social frameworks which undergird the community. Thus, their accusation of me as antithetical to the community opens an opportunity to consider the nature of that community.
    • Archaeological Investigations in the Soldiers' Barracks Complex of Mission San Antonio de Padua 1978-1981

      Williams, Jack S. (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1982)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 10, Spring 1993

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1993)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 11, Fall 1994

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1994)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 12, Winter 1996

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1996)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 13, Fall 1998

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1998)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 14, Fall 2001

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 2001)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 15, Fall 2003

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 2003)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 16, Winter 2005

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 2005)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 17, Winter 2006

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 2006)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 7, 1991

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1991)
    • Arizona Anthropologist Number 8, 1992

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1992)
    • The Arizona Anthropologist: History, Heritage, and Prospects

      Murphy, John T.; University of Arizona (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 2005)
    • Assimilation and Ethnicity: Ecological and Demographic Factors in Colonial Chiapas, Mexico

      Yarborough, Clare (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1986)
    • Atlatl Number 1, 1980

      Unknown author (University of Arizona, Department of Anthropology, 1980)