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dc.contributor.authorFountain, Amy V.
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-30T19:11:26Z
dc.date.available2011-03-30T19:11:26Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.issn0894-4539
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/126385
dc.descriptionCoyote Papers, Vol. 16 features a combined bibliography for all articles in the issue. This bibliography is available at http://arizona.openrepository.com/arizona/handle/10150/125965en_US
dc.description.abstractThis chapter briefly describes traditional approaches to the grammatical structure of Navajo, and is intended to provide definitions and examples of important and basic terms and concepts used (and perhaps argued against) in the rest of the papers in this volume. Readers who are unfamiliar with the Navajo language, or with the linguistic literature about Navajo, are encouraged to read this chapter before delving into the subsequent articles in this volume.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Arizona Linguistics Circleen_US
dc.titleIntroduction to Navajo language studiesen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalCoyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics, Linguistic Theory at the University of Arizonaen_US
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-18T10:31:50Z
html.description.abstractThis chapter briefly describes traditional approaches to the grammatical structure of Navajo, and is intended to provide definitions and examples of important and basic terms and concepts used (and perhaps argued against) in the rest of the papers in this volume. Readers who are unfamiliar with the Navajo language, or with the linguistic literature about Navajo, are encouraged to read this chapter before delving into the subsequent articles in this volume.


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