• Becoming pregnant : the lived experience of Mexican American adolescents

      Haase, Joan E.; Giles, Robin Lisa (The University of Arizona., 1998)
      Using a descriptive, phenomenological approach, this study explored: What is the essential structure of the lived experience of a Mexican .American adolescent becoming pregnant? Three pregnant Mexican American adolescents attending a teenage parent program in Arizona voluntarily participated in this study. The audio-taped interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Colaizzi's eight-step method as adapted by Haase. significant statements were identified, meanings formulated, and themes derived. Five major theme categories emerged: The Inconceivable: I am Pregnant, Searching for Answers, Innocence Lost, The Creation of Life, and The Future: Planning with care, from which the essential structure evolved. Implications for nursing practice and recommendations for future study are presented.
    • Demographic factors affecting psychosocial variables in adolescents with cancer

      Haase, Joan E.; Weiss, Grace Tomlinson; Manke, Gale; Moore, Ki; Hasse, Joan (The University of Arizona., 1995)
      The purpose of this comparative research study was to determine if there were differences in self-esteem, confidence, self-transcendence, ways of coping, symptom distress, and perceived social support by friends by selected demographic variables: age, gender and ethnicity. This study was a secondary data analysis. The participants were 130 adolescents with a diagnosis of cancer. Analysis revealed there were significant difference in ways of coping by age and gender. Older AWC used coping more often than younger AWC. Older AWC use emotive coping more often than younger AWC and older and middle AWC use evasive coping more often than younger AWC. Male AWC cope differently than female adolescents. Male AWC use self-reliant and confrontive coping more than female AWC, and male AWC identify self-reliant coping as more useful. Significant differences were not found based on ethnicity. Implications for nursing practice and suggestions for nursing research and theory development are presented.
    • Encounters with "bad nursing" : a phenomenological exploration of nurses' experiences with substandard practice

      Haase, Joan E.; Padgett, Stephen Mark, 1957-; May, Kathleen; Verran, Joyce; Paier, Geraldine (The University of Arizona., 1997)
      Although excellence and expertise in nursing practice have been extensively studied, inferior or substandard practice has been rarely researched. This descriptive, phenomenological study explores the lived experience of encountering substandard practice in a fellow nurse. Five registered nurses were interviewed using a broad, open-ended question, and the transcripts were analyzed using a seven-step method described by Colaizzi, to identify common themes and shared meanings. Participants described these events as difficult, anguishing, and highly contextualized. Common themes included an emphasis on persistent, non-technical practice deficits, and the crucial roles of unit culture, personal values, and prior work experiences in establishing expectations. Barriers to taking action included the reluctance to confront peers, the absence of collegiality between nurses, ambiguities of responsibilities between staff and management, and conflicts between interpersonal and professional models of relationships. Understanding these experiences will provide a more authentic basis for efforts at reform and improvement of practice.
    • The essence of healing

      Haase, Joan E.; Holbrook, Jill Nadine, 1948- (The University of Arizona., 1998)
      Healing is a human experience of primary concern to nurses. Understanding the experience of healing can offer nurses insight and possibly new ways to support healing in others. Healing Touch is an energy based therapeutic modality used to promote healing. With Healing Touch as one path and phenomenology as a guide, the lived experience of healing was explored. After analysis of the data from taped interviews the essential structure of the experience of healing was determined. Many similarities were found with literature and previous studies. Healing is described as a process, requiring active participation and effort through which a person becomes more aware with a higher consciousness, a sense of self worth and a feeling of serenity and joy. From this process and the many suggested paths, a prescription for healing emerged.
    • Essential structure of the lived experience of caring for a wife with Parkinson's Disease

      Haase, Joan E.; Hall, Juliana, 1972; Haase, Joan E.; Braden, Carrie; Siwarski, Elizabeth (The University of Arizona., 1997)
      Caring for a wife with Parkinson's disease is a multifaceted experience. Caregivers are faced with the daily challenges of impaired mobility , cognitive deficit , changes in activities of daily living, and alteration in personality. As both spouse and caregiver, husbands are forced to watch their wives deteriorate from this neurodegenerative disease , accept new roles and responsibilities , and move forward as they adapt to drastic , unexpected changes in their lives. Furthermore, there is a renewal of commitment to their marriage , maintaining devotion and caring for their wives even through years of debilitation and often suffering. In this phenomenological study , 3 men caring for their wives with Parkinson's disease were interviewed. The results of this study help to gain a better understanding of their lived experiences so that clinicians may pro vide care that addresses the unique concerns of these male spousal caregivers , establishing direction to the long-term goal of improved health and increased life satisfaction , through specialization of resources and sensitive outcome evaluation, for both patient and caregiver.
    • The essential structure of the lived experience of depression in adolescents

      Haase, Joan E.; Farmer, Terri Jean (The University of Arizona., 1997)
      The purpose of this study was to explore the adolescent's lived experience of being depressed through the research methodology of phenomenology. The sample consisted of 3 participants; two 13 year old females and one 14 year old male. Interviews were audiotaped and analyzed using an adaptation of Colaizzi's seven-step procedure. Results included Theme Categories of Dispirited Weariness; Emotional Homelessness: Sense of Aloneness; Emotional Homelessness: No Safety Where Expected; Constant, Unrelenting Anger; Working Through Parental Break-up; Caught in the Middle; Spectrum of Escape From Pain; Treatment Variations; Depression is an Up and Down Course; Perspectives on Friendship; Gaining A Sense of Getting Well; and, Assessing Progress So Far. The essential structure of the lived experience of depression in adolescents was formulated from all data.
    • The essential structure of the lived experience of long term oxygen therapy in elderly persons with COPD

      Haase, Joan E.; DeVries, Margaret Ruth (The University of Arizona., 1994)
      To explore the experience of being on long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) the research methodology of phenomenology was used. Four persons on LTOT longer than one year were interviewed using an open-ended question. Interviews were audio-tape recorded, then analyzed using an adaptation of Colaizzi's eight step procedure. Nine theme categories were identified: (1) Ravages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), (2) Adjustment to LTOT, (3) Acceptance of LTOT, (4) Oxygen: The Unwelcome Lifeline, (5) Making It Through: Internal and External Resources, (6) striving for Normalcy, (7) When Determination and Ingenuity Aren't Enough, (8) Perceptions and Influences of Others, and (9) Relationships With Healthcare: A Mixed Bag. The essential structure of being on LTOT derived from theme categories indicated adjustment to LTOT occurs within the context of COPD. Restrictions placed by COPD and LTOT result in a struggle to continue to find meaning and quality in life. The support of others is acknowledged as essential to survival.
    • The essential structure of the lived experience of the caregiver for the person with dementia at mealtime in the home setting

      Haase, Joan E.; Dukes, Cathy Lu (The University of Arizona., 2000)
      Caring for a loved one with dementia is a complex experience. The relentless nature of 24 hour care giving responsibility for the person with dementia, while observing the progressive loss of cognitive and functional abilities and even change in personality itself, can be overwhelming. The progressive loss of behaviors observed in persons with dementia includes alterations in eating habits and the ability to feed oneself. The ritual of giving and accepting of food involves both the efforts of the caregiver in meeting the fundamental nutritional needs of the person with dementia, as well as serving as a social interaction between the two. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to provide a full, rich description of the experience of the caregiver of the person with dementia at mealtime in the home setting. Through a deeper understanding of the mealtime experience from the perspective of the caregiver, nurses will be able to provide appropriate, sensitive interventions to support those afflicted with dementia and those striving to care for them. In this study three family caregivers participated in audiotaped interviews describing their experience feeding the person with dementia at home. Four theme categories were identified by phenomenological data analysis of the interviews. These were: (1) Food Preserves Life; (2) It Gnaws At You; (3) Slipping Away; (4) Being Alone In It. These categories illuminate the essential structure of this experience for caregivers who struggle on a daily basis to nourish and protect their loved ones who suffer the ongoing deterioration of dementia.
    • The essential structure of the lived experience of women with metastatic breast cancer who have undergone a bone marrow transplant : a secondary analysis

      Haase, Joan E.; Miners, Mary Lynn; Lacasse, Cheri (The University of Arizona., 2000)
      The purpose of this study was to examine the lived experience of women with metastatic breast cancer who have undergone a bone marrow transplant. The healthrelated quality of life is affected by this experience. This study is a secondary analysis of data collected in 1993-1994 at a major New England cancer research center. Data were analyzed using a phenomenological approach to derive an essential structure of the lived experience. Similar findings in this study were found in the literature review. Understanding the lived experience will enable health care providers to make educated, sensitive interventions to ensure optimum care of these patients. Findings indicate women reflect on the transplant process and experience a wide range of emotions during and after the procedure, and have ongoing physical discomforts and disabilities as they strive to return to a normal life.
    • Factors affecting perceived social support by adolescents with cancer

      Haase, Joan E.; Ely, Teresa; Moore, Ki; Manke, Gale (The University of Arizona., 1996)
      The purpose of this descriptive research study was to determine if there were differences in perceived social support based on family and health care resources. Family resources were measured by the parent's educational level, marital status and economic status. Health Care Resources were measured by program frequency, attendance, participation and satisfaction in the adolescent support program and the distance the adolescent lived from the health care facility. The study was a secondary data analysis. The participants were 130 adolescents with a diagnosis of cancer. Significant differences were found in perceived social support based on the mothers' level of education, but not in other family resources or health care resources. Based on the findings, nursing intervention and nursing research should focus on further identification of factors that increase the adolescents perceived social support.
    • The lived experience of being single for the never-married woman over age thirty

      Haase, Joan E.; Gruetzmacher, Anna (The University of Arizona., 2001)
      A moment occurs in life when a critical mass of pros and cons is reached, and the awakening happens. Ambivalent or not, the women were very clear that the direction to remain single after thirty was no accident. The journey is constantly changing and complex. Historically labeled as unhealthy and different than the norm, the battle ensues to overcome societal expectations, personal and familial hopes and dreams in order to establish themselves as complete and whole individuals. The intent may not be to remain single, but for the moment, have others respect them for who they are. Fourteen theme categories were identified after the data was analyzed. Understanding the complex interactions between structural, cultural and biographical aspect provides a fertile ground for nursing to assist single women to construct an independent life and find a place of peace until the next transition occurs.
    • The lived experience of hope in parents of critically ill children

      Haase, Joan E.; Wilkinson, Annie Meyer; Reed, Pamela (The University of Arizona., 1996)
      A phenomenological approach was used to explore the lived experience of hope in parents of critically ill children. Three mothers who had seriously ill children in a pediatric intensive care unit participated in the study unfolding rich descriptions of their experience. Interviews were audio-tape recorded and an adaption of Colazzi's eightstep method was used to analyze the data. Five major theme categories were identified which include coming to terms with having a critically ill child, the struggle, strategies to sustain hope, the changing faces of hope, and taking in and sifting through: moving toward acceptance. An essential structure was developed. Hope is described as a crucial dynamic force which parents clung to and fought for throughout the experience.
    • The lived experience of nurse practitioners caring for victims of domestic violence

      Haase, Joan E.; Briere, Sarah Beniquez (The University of Arizona., 1998)
      Domestic violence (DV) is a major health care problem. Providing care for victims of domestic violence is a multifaceted experience. Nurse practitioners are faced with the daily challenges of providing medical and social services, coordinating quality care, and ensuring safety for these victims. As health care providers, nurse practitioners are forced to uncover the truth about abuse, accept new roles and responsibilities, and move forward as they care for these victims. Furthermore, there is a renewal of commitment to their role as a nurse practitioner, maintaining devotion and caring for victims ofDV even when victims decide to return to the abuse. In this phenomenological study, three nurse practitioners who care for victims of DV were interviewed. The results of this study help to gain a better understanding of their lived experiences so that clinicians may provide care that addresses the unique concerns of both victims of DV and health care providers, establishing direction to the long-term goal of improved health, through specialization of resources and sensitive outcome evaluation, for both the victim and health care provider.
    • The lived experience of schooling the child with cognitive late effects of cancer treatment

      Haase, Joan E.; Mehlem, Sheila (The University of Arizona., 1998)
      The purpose of this secondary analysis study was to explore the lived experience of schooling a child with cognitive deficits as a result of late effects of central nervous system cancer therapy. The sample consisted of seven female participants who provided a rich description of their experience. Audiotaped interviews were analyzed using an adaptation of Colaizzi's seven-step procedure. Eleven major themes emerged: Watching the Academic Downslide, Dealing with the Academic Downslide, Teachers Setting the Tone, Parent-Teacher Interactions, Working the (School) System, Specific Strategies to Address the Academic Problem, Homework, Ways of Caring for Oneself, Hopes and Fears, Living with the Cure, and Hope Continues. An essential structure was derived from the data.
    • The lived experience of surviving ovarian cancer for women in remission

      Haase, Joan E.; Slowey, Judith Ann; Haase, Jaon; Moore, Ki; Braden, Carrie (The University of Arizona., 1997)
      Living with ovarian cancer for women in remission is a complex experience. These women are faced with grave circumstances of a cancer with a poor long-term prognosis to endure, that includes physical and psychological pain , sometimes short-term but often long-lasting. The ovarian cancer survivor must become well acquainted with health care providers at the same time they experience changing relationships with family and friends . The women are forced to confront issues of mortality as a result of the threat of dying. Through the experience, with adequate sources of support, a personal , positive attitude and sense of hope emerge. The woman with ovarian cancer is a survivor. In this phenomenological study , three women living with ovarian cancer in remission were interviewed. This study revealed that this particular group of women had to decide to have the determination to fight the cancer, search for proper sources of suppqrt, and maintain a sense of hope and a positive attitude. They were also forced to contend with relationships, both good and bad , and experience anguish and apprehension in a heightened awareness of mortality. The findings from this study assist health care practitioners to better understand the women ' s lived experiences for the purpose of improving care that specifically applies to this group of individuals and their unique concerns. A thorough understanding of the unique issues experienced with ovarian cancer will enable health care professionals to individualize care, make available all possible resources, and encourage the women along their chosen paths.
    • A phenomenological study of the experience of receiving a positive HIV diagnosis

      Haase, Joan E.; Flick, Mary Lee (The University of Arizona., 1996)
      The experience of receiving a positive HIV diagnosis was studied using the qualitative research method of phenomenology. Three individuals who had received a positive diagnosis were interviewed in open-ended question format. The interviews were audiotape recorded and transcribed to hard copy. The interviews were then analyzed using Colaizzi's steps of phenomenological research analysis. The following eight theme categories were -identified: The Gavel Falls,Numbing the Pain, Facing the Pain, How I Got Here, Reactions of Others, Facing the Consequences, Help From God, and Going Beyond. The essential structure of the experience demonstrated moving through the experience to be a process which allowed the participants to transcend to a new level of personal awareness.
    • Spirituality in oncology nurses : a phenomenological study

      Haase, Joan E.; O'Connor, Mary Francine; Reed, Pamela; Moore, Ki (The University of Arizona., 1997)
      This study aims to illuminate the lived experience of spirituality in practicing oncology nurses. Definitions of spirituality, a conceptual framework for understanding spirituality in nursing, and the purpose of the study are offered in Chapter One. Chapter Two reviews the literature on spirituality in nursing and illustrates the lack of research on spirituality from nurses' perspective. Concepts in the literature related to spirituality, including intuition, miracles, and hope are reviewed. Literature on spirituality in related fields is also reviewed. Chapter Three provides a historical perspective on phenomenology and scrutinizes its usefulness in examining spirituality in oncology nurses. It also describes the sample, human subjects, and the procedure used in the study. Trustworthiness, credibility, and data analysis are also addressed. Chapter Four presents the findings of the study in the exhaustive description and essential structure. Finally, Chapter Five presents a review of the conceptual :framework, discussion and conclusions, implications for further research, and clinical implications.