ABOUT THE COLLECTION

Arizona Cooperative Extension is an outreach arm of The University of Arizona and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS). The repository collection includes current and historical Extension publications on these topics: Animal Systems; Consumer Education; Farm Management and Safety; Food Safety, Nutrition and Health; Gardening/Home Horticulture; Insects and Pest Management; Marketing and Retailing; Natural Resources and Environment; Plant Diseases; Plant Production/Crops; Water; and Youth and Family. Current publications are also available from the Cooperative Extension Publications website.

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Contact College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.

Collections in this community

Recent Submissions

  • Arizona Range Grasses: Their Description, Forage Value, and Grazing Management

    Ruyle, George B.; Young, Deborah Jean (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003)
    From the Foreword by George B. Ruyle and Deborah J. Young: The need to reprint Arizona Range Grasses has been evident for some time. The grass family is one of the largest and most important families of flowering plants. Over half of the genera and nearly one-third of the grass species are found in Arizona. Many people enjoy the natural resources of Arizona and are interested in learning the names of the grasses. As with bird watching, an interest in grasses can greatly add to the enjoyment of nature. Additionally, ranchers and professional resource managers continue to require technical sources of information on rangelands. In this new edition, the text has been updated from the classic volume originally written by Professor R.R. Humphrey. Many changes have occurred in the scientific names. These were brought to current usage by John and Charlotte Reeder, visiting scholars at the University of Arizona (1997). These changes and their other suggestions required great expertise and much time. Additionally, at the suggestion and under the guidance of Dr. Mitch McClaran and help of Katie Meyer we have added a table of synonyms to help track these changes. Dr. McClaran also helped with the addition of growing season and origin. We wish to express our appreciation to them and to Robert Casler, who located the original line drawings for reprinting and did much to see the new edition into print. While more details are now known about the responses of grasses to defoliation, the general principles of grazing management remain similar to those Dr. Humphrey discussed in his original grass descriptions. Grazing intensity, frequency and season of use are the primary factors that determine how well grasses tolerate grazing. Moderate levels of use and periodic growing season deferment from grazing are common management prescriptions. Less consideration is given today to plant food reserves as the major control of grass regrowth following grazing. More recent research indicates that the ability to rapidly regrow after being grazed is controlled by many factors, and that this ability is critical to plant recovery following grazing. Grasses have many values beyond their use as forage, including watershed protection and natural beauty. Livestock grazing, however, continues to be a major land use in Arizona and is primarily supported by native grasses growing on rangelands. It is our hope that this book will provide a basis for the sound management of these rangeland resources and save as a tool for naturalists and others interested in grasses.
  • 4-H Project Essentials - Livestock Feeding Glossary of Terms

    Farella, Joshua; Menges, Ashley Js (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2024-01)
    This resource is intended to give 4-H leaders, youth, and families an overview of key terminology involved in the feeding of livestock.
  • A Guide to the Hormones Used in Cattle Estrus Synchronization for Artificial Insemination

    Wright, Ashley Diane (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-09)
    The University of Arizona hosts several Artificial Insemination (A.I.) clinics for cattle producers each year.One of the most common points of confusion for producers navigating the A.I. process is understanding estrus synchronization and determining which products are equivalent to each other across manufacturers. This fact sheet is provided as a guide to help identify equivalent estrus synchronization products across major brands, it is not intended to promote any specific brand or product. The University of Arizona does not endorse any specific product and recommends users do their own research and work with their veterinarian to determine which products are appropriate for them and their operation.
  • A Soil Health Needs Assessment Survey in Arizona

    Sanyal, Debankur; Masson, Robert; Stackpole, Charles; Arp, Taylor (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-10)
    A needs assessment survey is an important tool for designing an efficient research-based extension and outreach plan. The Soil Health Research and Extension (SHRE) team at the University of Arizona designed and conducted a statewide soil health needs assessment survey to document stakeholder perceptions, interests, and expectations on soil health research and educational needs. The survey successfully documented essential information from a diverse group of producers, pest control advisors, and other industry members (total respondents 107) that represented the commercial agricultural industry in Arizona. The data confirmed stakeholder interest in soil health research and educational programs and provided the necessary information on their soil health needs to build an effective research-based soil health extension program. The survey outcomes revealed that the respondents are majorly interested in on-farm soil health assessments and learning about soil biology. The respondents also indicated that research demonstrations, workshops, and training events are important to them in adopting new technologies for soil health improvements.
  • Aerobic and Anaerobic Grape Pomace Composting: The Pros and Cons

    Mpanga, Issac K. (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-01)
    In Arizona, wine production increased from 65,413 gallons (2007) to 297,145 gallons 2017) (Murphree, 2018), with an estimated 354% increase in grape pomace production within the same period. The grape pomace is a by-product of the wineries, which is obtained after crashing the grape fruits, fermenting and pressing the juice.
  • Arizona 4-H Livestock Judging: Program Overview

    Menges, Ashley Js; Farella, Joshua (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03)
    4-H Livestock judging is a great program opportunity where youth can strengthen their decision-making abilities, grow communication skills, and develop sound critical thinking and articulate reasoning. Youth that excel in livestock judging cultivate an ethic of research, practice, and work hard to communicate clearly and concisely to judges and peers. Livestock judging is a competitive event centered around the visual evaluation of an animal’s physical traits and at times performance data. The goal is to compare and contrast four animals in a class against each other as well as the “ideal” animal.
  • Arizona 4-H Professionals Onboarding Program Guide

    Elliott-Engel, Jeremy; Parrott, Amy; Hauser, Michael; Sparks, Elizabeth W. (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-02)
  • Arizona Cooperative Alfalfa Forage Yield Trials (1993-2020)

    Ottman, Michael J.; White, Jeffrey W.; Smith, Steven E. (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-03)
    The Arizona Cooperative Alfalfa Forage Yield Trial Program, administered by the Arizona Agricultural Experiment Station and Arizona Cooperative Extension, conducted alfalfa forage yield trials at the University of Arizona's Agriculture Centers in Maricopa and Tucson. The Maricopa location is at 1188 ft elevation and has a sandy loam soil. The Tucson location is at 2352 ft elevation and has a very fine sandy loam soil. Very non-dormant cultivars are well-adapted to this environment, which is typical of agricultural areas of the low elevation deserts of Arizona where 8 to 10 harvests of alfalfa are common each year and stands typically remain productive for 2 to 4 years. All fields were laser-leveled and alfalfa was irrigated using the border-strip methods.
  • Arizona Landscape Palms and their Management

    Schuch, Ursula K.; Quist, Tanya M. (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-04)
    Palm trees offer versatility and dramatic impact unparalleled among other desert adapted plants for low and mid elevation landscapes in Arizona. They broaden the plant palette for designers, contributing dramatic foliage, flower and fruit structures, bold shapes, diverse textures, and sizes. Palms are treasured for creating a feeling of relaxed luxury and infusing the landscape with exotic and tropical flavor. Although usually associated with iconic California landscapes, many palm species work well in Arizona when selected and managed judiciously to ensure long-term health and landscape sustainability. Palms suitable for Arizona climates need to tolerate freezing temperatures, high heat, and low humidity. This publication covers 18 palm species that can be successfully cultivated in Arizona given appropriate growing conditions. We describe how palms differ in form and growth from other trees as a result of their unique biology, considerations for using them effectively in the landscape, and cultural practices for planting, transplanting, maintaining, and controlling their pests and diseases. This content provides a basis for understanding suitability of various palm species for Arizona climate and microclimates, and the long-term commitment required to ensure performance, longevity and aesthetic contribution to a landscape.
  • Arizona Specialty Honeys

    Lesenne, Anne (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-05)
    Beekeepers in Arizona are lucky to live in a state where the growing season is long and there is something in bloom almost all year long. Many beekeepers choose to have one apiary location and harvest ‘wildflower’ honey once a year ($2.18 per pound)i. Other beekeepers choose to move their hives according to what is blooming and harvest specialty monofloral honeys ($12 to $18 per pound) from each nectar flow. With a little planning and cooperation with landowners or farmers, they can produce much more honey per hive as well as charge more per pound for their honey produced. To get truly monofloral honey the hive must be placed where there is an abundance of one floral resource, and not much else. Bees tend to focus on the type of nectar that is most abundant and easily available, so they cooperate with this type of management. Honeybees will fly up to 3 miles to find nectar and pollen, but they love efficiency, so placing them in the middle of, or at the edge of a large crop will ensure the best results. Pollination by bees can increase fruit set and quality as well as seed set by up to 70% in some crops! Best pollination occurs when there is at least one robust hive per acre.
  • Arizona’s Seasonal Role in National Supply of Vegetable & Melon Specialty Crops

    Duval, Dari (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-09)
    Arizona’s agricultural industries are diverse, producing a wide variety of field crops, orchard crops, fruits and vegetables, livestock, and livestock products. Western Arizona, including the Yuma area, and Central Arizona to a lesser extent, play niche roles in the production of specialty vegetable and melon crops. Because of geography and climate, Western and Central Arizona serve as the leading source and at times even exclusive source of certain commodities at the national level. This analysis provides an overview of Arizona’s seasonal role in supplying certain commodities nationally.
  • AZ 4-H Shooting Sports: Program Overview

    Menges, Ashley Js; Farella, Joshua (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-03)
    Shooting sports programs are a wonderful way to connect youth with safely trained caring adult mentors. Certified volunteers teach safe and appropriate firearms/archery etiquette and provide youth with leadership and competition opportunities. Shooting sports certifications are also a great avenue for volunteer professional development, with opportunities to become certified to teach youth, adult level 1 instructors, and nationally certified level 2 instructors. Young people can also take on leadership roles in clubs as Youth Instructors. Like any project, there are opportunities for members and volunteers to participate at county, state, and national levels. In addition, there are a few key requirements found in shooting sports that other 4-H projects do not have. Read through the information below to learn how to grow a shooting sports program in your county!
  • Best Practices for Healthy Horsekeeping

    Mastellar, Sara L.; Darrington, Joe; Greene, Elizabeth A. (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-12)
    Biosecurity Basics: A New Perspective Post Pandemic. Whoever imagined that a worldwide pandemic would help highlight the value and importance of horse disease prevention processes/practices and biosecurity? Some have compared our covid pandemic experience to “The Great Epizootic”, an equine disease outbreak that brought our nation to its horse-drawn knees in 1872 (Moates, 2020). Previously, biosecurity education in the horse world was often met with the “teenage eye roll” reaction, or comments, such as “It will never happen to me”, but since COVID-19, knowledge and understanding of disease prevention has improved. Many people have been directly or indirectly affected/impacted by illness, loss of loved ones, canceled events, and quarantines. Regardless of personal views on the response to the pandemic, very few people would not be able to rattle off “wash your hands, don’t touch your face, and social distance”. One key difference between humans and horses is that horses don't have the ability to make their own decisions about biosecurity. Human caretakers can help set horses up for success or failure.
  • Beware of Fire Ant Stings

    Li, Shujuan (Lucy); Gouge, Dawn H.; Nair, Shaku; Graham, Lawrence (Fudd); Fournier, Alfred J.; Umeda, Kai (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-10)
  • Calendario de siembra de hortalizas en el condado de Maricopa

    Young, Kelly Murray; Umeda, Kai (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2022-06)
    En el condado de Maricopa se puede cultivar con éxito casi todo tipo de hortalizas y frutas si se seleccionan las variedades adecuadas y se plantan en el momento adecuado. El clima, la estación del año y las posibles plagas influyen en la selección sobre qué plantar y cuándo. En los viveros, los jardineros profesionales le pueden aconsejar sobre las distintas especies más populares de hortalizas y frutas que se adaptan adecuadamente a las condiciones del desierto.
  • Chiricahua Leopard Frog Management in Southern Arizona

    Noel, Whitney; Sittig, Julia; Gornish, Elise S. (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-01)
    The Chiricahua leopard frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis, hereafter referred to as “CLF”) is a native frog in southern Arizona. The CLF range spans through central Arizona and south into the Altar Valley where it extends into Sonora, Mexico and east to the southwestern portion of New Mexico (1). This federally threatened species once existed in many cienegas, pools, lakes, streams, and reservoirs across southern and central Arizona. By 2011, CLF had disappeared from more than 80% of their historical locations in the U.S. (2). Their habitat is now largely limited to stock tanks, springs, and streams that are protected by local management and landowners from water loss and non-native predators such as bullfrogs. Solutions to these threats require creating and improving ideal habitat. Management approaches can be developed by investigating the factors that contribute to suitable habitat and understanding.
  • Citrus Fertilization Chart for Arizona

    Wright, Glenn C. (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
    To promote optimal growth and production of your citrus tree, use the chart to determine the correct amount of fertilizer to apply.
  • Common Household Flies and Prevention Tips

    Ignat, Sam; Cooper, Margarethe A.; Gouge, Dawn H.; Li, Shujuan (Lucy) (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-06)
    Successfully managing flies in human living spaces requires putting prevention at the forefront.
  • Community Engagement for Cooperative Extension: Collaborate and Community Directs from the Spectrum of Public Participation

    Leih, Rachel; McCullough, Lauren; Farrell, Vanessa; Walsh, Michele (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-09)
    The International Association for Public Participation developed a spectrum of public participation with five different levels that indicate the various depths of community engagement.1 The levels include Inform, Consult, Involve, Collaborate, and Community Directs (Figure 1). This publication will review the Collaborate and Community Directs levels of the spectrum.
  • Community Engagement for Cooperative Extension: Inform and Consult from the Spectrum of Public Participation

    Leih, Rachel; McCullough, Lauren; Farrell, Vanessa; Walsh, Michele (College of Agriculture, Life & Environmental Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2023-09)
    Community engagement addresses the core concerns of residents and stakeholders by engaging them in a process of initiating, drafting, and implementing community-based programs. Community engagement guides collaboration and communication among organizations, stakeholders, and the public to create sustainable community-driven change. The International Association for Public Participation has developed a spectrum of public participation with five different levels that indicate the various depths of community engagement. The levels include Inform, Consult, Involve, Collaborate, and Community Directs. This publication will review the Inform and Consult levels of the spectrum.

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