ABOUT THE COLLECTION

Arizona Cooperative Extension is an outreach arm of The University of Arizona and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS). The repository collection includes current and historical Extension publications on these topics: Animal Systems; Consumer Education; Farm Management and Safety; Food Safety, Nutrition and Health; Gardening/Home Horticulture; Insects and Pest Management; Marketing and Retailing; Natural Resources and Environment; Plant Diseases; Plant Production/Crops; Water; and Youth and Family. Current publications are also available from the Cooperative Extension Publications website.

QUESTIONS?

Contact College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Publications at pubs@cals.arizona.edu.

Recent Submissions

  • Asian Longhorned Tick, an Invasive Tick in the United States

    Li, Shujuan (Lucy); Gouge, Dawn H.; Walker, Kathleen; Fournier, Alfred J. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2019-03)
    The Asian longhorned tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, is also known as the cattle tick or bush tick. It is native to East Asia: China, Korea, Japan, and well established in Australia and New Zealand. It is also an invasive tick species in the United States (U.S.). This tick is a serious pest of livestock and wildlife in several countries (Heath 2016, Guan et al. 2010). If the Asian longhorned tick becomes established in Arizona, it could become a serious threat to livestock, wildlife, and pets.
  • Understanding Vegetation Succession with State and Transition Models

    Brischke, Andrew; Hall, Ashley; McReynolds, Kim (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2018-08)
    Effective natural resource management involves balancing benefits derived from utilizing the environment against potential environmental degradation. Rangeland managers need to not only recognize change in plant communities, but also need to identify possible causes of vegetation trends. Vegetation evaluation procedures must be able to measure and interpret both reversible and nonreversible vegetation dynamics. Both patterns occur, and neither pattern alone represents the entire spectrum of vegetation dynamics on all rangelands (Briske et al. 2005).
  • Rangeland Monitoring Frame and Construction Guide

    Hall, Ashley; Brischke, Andrew; Hall, John (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2018-07)
    The objective of rangeland vegetation trend monitoring is to document changes over time in vegetation or other rangeland resources. Common methods often used together throughout Arizona and the west include Point Ground Cover, Pace Frequency, Dry-Weight Rank, and Comparative Yield. Further details regarding these methods and ground rules can be found in Sampling Vegetation Attributes (Interagency Technical Manual, 1996), Guide to Rangeland Monitoring and Assessment (Smith et al., 2012), or Southeastern Arizona Monitoring Program: Methods and Ground Rules (McReynolds and Brischke, 2015).
  • The Brown Dog Tick and Epidemic Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Arizona and Northwestern Mexico

    Walker, Kathleen; Yaglom, Hayley; Gouge, Dawn H.; Brophy, Maureen; Casal, Mariana; Ortiz Encinas, Veronica (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2018-05)
    The brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus, has a worldwide distribution and is found throughout the United States (US) and Mexico. This tick is driving epidemics of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) in Arizona and northwest Mexico. As the name suggests, the tick mainly takes blood meals from dogs, but it will also feed on humans and other mammals, and can carry serious disease causing pathogens. In the early 2000’s it was found to transmit Rickettsia rickettsii, (a gram-negative, intracellular, coccobacillus bacterium) that causes RMSF in Arizona. This was the first time this tick species has been associated with the disease in the US (Demma et al. 2005). Similar outbreaks occurred at the same time in Sonora and more recently in Baja California (Alvarez- Hernandez et al. 2017).
  • Guide to Co-Developing Drought Preparation Plans for Livestock Grazing on Southwest National Forests

    Hawkes, Kelsey L.; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Brugger, Julie; Crimmins, Michael A.; Howery, Larry D.; Ruyle, George B.; Sprinkle, James E.; Tolleson, Douglas R. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2018-04)
    This Guide is one output of a long-term project organized by researchers from the University of Arizona, which intended to address drought concerns for livestock grazing in the Southwestern United States. At an initial workshop held in 2013, local stakeholders identified the lack of flexibility regarding the administration of public land grazing as a challenge to managing and becoming prepared for drought.
  • Nature and Nurture’s Influence on Cattle Distribution

    Howery, Larry D.; Bailey, Derek W. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2018-03)
    Although stocking rate is often described as the most important decision livestock managers make, most environmental concerns associated with cattle ranching in the western U.S. result from undesirable grazing distribution patterns, especially on public lands. In the West, mountainous terrain and arid and semi arid climatic conditions restrict where cattle are willing and able to go. For example, cattle typically congregate on gentle terrain and in areas near limited water sources. Cattle are typically reluctant to graze steep slopes, climb high ridges and travel long distances from water. These preferences can lead to excessive forage use on gentle terrain located near water, including riparian areas, while abundant forage on rugged terrain and areas far from water are left ungrazed. In summary, concerns with cattle grazing in the western U.S. are usually not a consequence of too many cows, but instead, are due to cattle selectively concentrating use in certain areas while avoiding other areas.
  • Rain Gauges for Range Management: Precipitation Monitoring Best Practices Guide

    Crimmins, Michael A.; McClaran, Mitchel; Brugger, Julie; Hall, Ashley; Tolleson, Douglas; Brischke, Andrew (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-11)
    Precipitation in the form of rain and snow is critical to many aspects of working lands from controlling the growth of vegetation used in grazing by livestock and wildlife to recharging local water resources found in springs, tanks and riparian areas. Land management decisions often require some knowledge of how much precipitation fell within a management unit to assess how past actions have performed and what to do next. For example, do forage conditions reflect a lack of precipitation or grazing management? Did the next pasture or allotment in my rotation get any rainfall over the past season?
  • Value of University of Arizona Cooperative Extension’s Involvement in Immediate Post-Wallow Fire Grazing Recovery

    Duval, Dari; Ruyle, George; Dyess, Judith (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-11)
    The University of Arizona Cooperative Extension participated in cooperative efforts to monitor rangeland recovery and assess forage availability after the Wallow Fire that provided critical information supporting the Forest Service’s decision to allow grazing to resume on allotments earlier than originally anticipated. Enhancement and use of the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Vegetation GIS Data System software allowed Forest Service and University personnel to quickly record and analyze ecological data. This ecological data was important to determining the response of vegetation to provide forage for livestock and wildlife. Estimates of benefits to ranchers from earlier resumption of grazing on their allotments range from $12,241 to $52,835 per allotment. Estimates of total rancher benefits range from $477,410 to $2,060,577.
  • A Mobile Solar Pv Water Pumping Demonstration System For Public Outreach

    Franklin, Ed (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-10)
  • Rangeland Plant Life Forms

    Howery, Larry D.; Hall, Ashley; Noelle, Sarah (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-09)
    Allen et al. (2011) defined rangelands as: Arid and semi-arid land on which the indigenous vegetation is predominantly grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, or shrubs that are grazed or have the potential to be grazed, and which is used as a natural ecosystem for the production of livestock and wildlife. Rangelands may include natural grasslands, savannas, shrub lands, many deserts, steppes, tundras, alpine communities, and marshes.
  • Garrapatas marrones del perro y las enferemedades por rickettsias en la población

    Li, Shujuan; Gouge, Dawn H.; Brophy, Maureen; Nair, Shaku; Walker, Kathleen; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-10)
  • Brown Dog Ticks and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Li, Shujuan; Gouge, Dawn H.; Brophy, Maureen; Nair, Shaku; Walker, Kathleen; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-07)
  • Mosquitoes and Disease Concerns

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Li, Shujuan; Nair, Shakunthala; Brophy, Maureen; Walker, Kathleen; Sumner, Chris; Ramberg, Frank (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-04)
  • Project Essentials Livestock Fact Sheets Small Stock Vol. 1: Cavies, Poultry, Rabbit

    Farella, Joshua; Arias, Juan; Carstens, Renee; Moore, Joshua; Jeffers-Sample, Ashley (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-08)
    The goal of the “Project Essentials” sheets is to provide a basic resource for 4-H members and parents to get started in a new small stock project. Small stock projects are a challenge, and these sheets will help provide first steps and basic knowledge on your animal’s needs. These sheets should be utilized by families to foster a youth’s ‘learning to learn’ skills. There are several key housing boarding and feeding needs to be discussed, in addition to cost estimates for each type of animal. You will also see an “additional resource” and "local resources" section. The additional resources are links to examples within a greater body of resource material, again this is not a complete source but rather a place to get started in your project journey. The local resources section is very important – getting involved in your local community will provide a 4-H member with a rich body of knowledge and experience, and this is a great opportunity for young people to interact with peers and caring adult volunteers.
  • Project Essentials Livestock Fact Sheets Large Stock Vol. 1: Beef, Market Goat, Horse, Market Sheep, Swine

    Farella, Joshua; Moore, Joshua; Arias, Juan; Carstens, Renee; Jeffers-Sample, Ashley (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-08)
    The goal of the “Project Essentials” sheets is to provide a basic resource for new 4-H members and parents to get started in a livestock project. Livestock projects can be challenging and it is the goal of these tip sheets to provide first steps and basic knowledge on your project’s needs. The following information should be utilized by families to foster a youth’s ‘learning to learn’ skills. There are several key livestock boarding and feeding requirements discussed, in addition to cost estimates for each type of animal. You will also see an “additional resources” and “local resources” section. The additional resources are links to examples within a greater body of resource material – again this is not a complete resource, but a starting point. The local resources section is very important – getting involved in your local community will provide a 4H member with a rich body of knowledge and experience. 4-H Livestock Projects provide a great opportunity for young people to interact with peers and caring adults.
  • Poultry Manure Effects on Soil Minerals in a Flood Irrigated Sandy-Loam Pastureland

    Mpanga, Isaac K. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-05)
    Interest in the use of poultry manure as a soil amendment has grown along with increased concern of sustainable resource use and recycling on Arizona farms, particularly in organic production systems. According to Mpanga et al.(2020a), manure application in Arizona increased by 30%from 2012 to 2017. Application of poultry manure to soil has numerous benefits such as increasing soil fertility, improving soil texture and structure, and increasing soil water infiltration, organic matter content, and microbial activity (Koelsch K., 2018). However, poultry manure application could also have negative consequences including increased soil salt content, the potential for zoonotic disease transmission in vegetable production, and objectionable odors. This bulletin reports on an evaluation of the effects of poultry manure application on soil minerals on a Northern Arizonan sandy loam soil with flood irrigated pasture.
  • Backyard Chickens and Ectoparasites: Introduction and Management

    Nair, Shakunthala (Shaku); Gouge, Dawn H.; Murillo, Amy C. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-04)
    Keeping backyard chickens is an important socio-cultural activity for many households, especially in rural and fringe communities. There has been an increasing interest in this activity in urban areas in recent times (Fig. 1), resulting in a rise in sales of fertilized hatching eggs, young birds and backyard coops from local and online sellers. While keeping chickens may sound easy, it has also led to a surge in reports of ectoparasite and other pest issues related to keeping chickens that novice backyard chicken keepers have not anticipated.
  • Rabies Risk Reduction

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Venkat, Heather (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-01)
    Rabies is a preventable disease caused by a virus that affects the nervous system. If an exposed person does not receive immediate medical care, disease and death will follow. Rabies is always fatal. In the United States, most rabies exposures occur when people interact with wild animals like bats, skunks, foxes and raccoons. But other animals like bobcats, coyotes, javelina, cats, dogs, horses, cattle, and many other mammals can carry rabies and infect people and pets.
  • Financial Options for Livestock Producers During Natural Disasters

    Brischke, Andrew; Crimmins, Michael; Grace, Josh; Hall, Ashley; McClaran, Mitchel (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2020-12)
    Natural disasters affecting the agricultural industry occur regularly throughout the United States and may receive a disaster designation from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Disaster payments through various programs from 2014-2018 totaled over $63.6 million in Arizona (EWG, 2020). Agricultural disasters often place economic hardships on producers. Producers in arid/semiarid regions like the southwest U.S. are particularly susceptible to the impacts of drought while other regions may be more susceptible to other disasters such as blizzards and extreme cold (e.g. Northern Great Plains).
  • Brown Dog Ticks

    Li, Shujuan; Gouge, Dawn H.; Nair, Shaku; Walker, Kathleen; Brophy, Maureen (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2021-10)

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