• Being Prepared for Show Livestock Injuries and Illnesses

      Didier, Elizabeth; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-10)
      Illness or injury to a show animal may be preventable by following a few guidelines. Providing a clean and safe environment and properly feeding, watering, and vaccinating animals will help to reduce the risks of experiencing illnesses and injuries. Owners should also learn how to identify signs of health problems, such as sudden changes in behavior or appearance, and prepare a first aid kit for use in the event of an emergency. Also, being familiar with emergency treatment guidelines will help owners protect themselves, prevent further injury to the animal, and properly administer care to the animal if appropriate.
    • Collection and Storage of Agricultural Animal Wastes and Wastewater

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The greatest management concern with animal wastes is the movement of nitrate into water supplies. Health problems in humans and livestock can result from excessive levels of nitrate in drinking water. This publication outlines the guidelines to minimizing the risk of contaminating your drinking water. It also lists a number of questions to check if your management practices in the collection and storage of animal wastes may pose a risk to your groundwater.
    • The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Masters, Linda; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the CRIT reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The Colorado River Indian Tribes (C.R.I.T.) Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Masters, Linda; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Colorado River Indian Tribes reservation.
    • Conducting Research Projects on the San Carlos Apache Reservation, Arizona

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the research protocol of the San Carlos Apache Tribe reservation.
    • Crossbreeding Systems for Arizona Rangelands

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-11)
    • Establishing Irrigated Pasture at 4,000 to 6,000 Ft. Elevations in Arizona

      Young, Deborah; Frost, Bill; Schneider, Mike (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-09)
    • Feeding Management for Show Lambs

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-08)
      As a general rule, lambs are not purchased until they are at least 8 weeks old and exceed 40lbs. in weight. The lamb should gain an average of .5 to .8 lbs. a day. This publication discusses how to feed a show lamb according to its nutrient needs.
    • Feeding Management for Show Steers

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-08)
      Large frame steers weigh from 1200 to 1400 pounds at finish weight, while medium frame steers are only around 700 pounds. This publication discusses how to select and feed a steer in order to get it to its' desired weight.
    • Heifer Development on Rangeland

      Sprinkle, Jim; Tolleson, Doug (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Heifer Development on Rangeland

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-11)
    • The Hopi Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Livingston, Matt; Benally, Jeannie; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hopi reservation, as well as the history of extension and effective extension programs and collaborations conducted on this reservation.
    • The Hopi Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Livingston, Matt; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hopi reservation.
    • How Do Domestic Herbivores Select Nutritious Diets on Rangelands?

      Howery, Larry D.; Provenza, Frederick; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Animal learning has been shown to play a major role in the development of diet selection by domestic herbivores. Dr. Frederick Provenza and his associates at Utah State University have conducted a series of experiments over the past 15 years to learn how physiological and behavioral mechanisms govern diet selection. This publication synthesizes several key diet selection concepts presented in four recent articles.
    • How Many Animals Can I Graze on My Pasture?

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-11)
    • The Hualapai Reservation and Extension Programs

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Long, Jonathan; Crowley, Terry; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet explores the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hualapai reservation, and includes the extension program methods which work well on the reservation as well as collaborators who work with extension.
    • The Hualapai Reservation Quick Facts

      Tuttle, Sabrina; Crowley, Terry; Agricultural Education (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-10)
      This fact sheet briefly describes the socioeconomic and cultural aspects of the Hualapai reservation.
    • Making Decisions Regarding the Balance between Milk Quality, Udder Health, and Parlor Throughput

      VanBaale, Matthew; Smith, John; Armstrong, Dennis; Harner, Joe; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-04)
      As today's dairy industry consolidates, cows are being milked more rapidly through larger milking parlors on larger dairies than ever before. Because milk is the primary commodity and source of income for producers, the harvesting of milk is the single most important job on any dairy. Producing high-quality milk to maximize yields and economic value requires effective parlor management, an enormous challenge for producers. Managing large parlors includes managing labor, milking equipment, as well as monitoring and evaluating parlor performance. Decisions concerning the milking center are some of the most complicated decisions a dairy producer has to make. Milking procedures, herd size, milking interval, the milk market, and the equity position of a producer influence these decisions. Producers will have to make the following decisions before they can select or develop management protocols for a milking parlor: 1. How many cows will be milked through the parlor? 2. What milking procedure will be used (minimal or full)? 3. If a full milking routine; how much contact time do you want (strips per teat)? 4. Which milking routine will be used (sequential, grouping, or territorial)? 5. Are you willing to train teams of milkers to operate large parlors?
    • Managing Nutritional Challenges to Reproduction

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-11)
    • Managing Personnel for Milking Parlors on Large Herds

      VanBaale, Matthew; Smith, John; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-04)
      As today's dairy consolidates, cows are being milked more rapidly through larger milking parlors on larger dairies than ever before. Because milk is the primary commodity and source of income for producers, the harvesting of milk is the single most important job on any dairy. Producing high-quality milk to maximize yields and economic value requires effective parlor management, an enormous challenge for producers. Managing large parlors includes managing labor, milking equipment, as well as monitoring and evaluating parlor performance. The goal of parlor management for large herds is to enhance profits by maximizing milk yield, udder health, and overall efficiency. This may be accomplished by adequately training and motivating employees to efficiently milking clean, dry, stimulated teats using proper milking hygiene.