• How Many Animals Can I Graze on My Pasture?

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-11)
    • Managing Personnel for Milking Parlors on Large Herds

      VanBaale, Matthew; Smith, John; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-04)
      As today's dairy consolidates, cows are being milked more rapidly through larger milking parlors on larger dairies than ever before. Because milk is the primary commodity and source of income for producers, the harvesting of milk is the single most important job on any dairy. Producing high-quality milk to maximize yields and economic value requires effective parlor management, an enormous challenge for producers. Managing large parlors includes managing labor, milking equipment, as well as monitoring and evaluating parlor performance. The goal of parlor management for large herds is to enhance profits by maximizing milk yield, udder health, and overall efficiency. This may be accomplished by adequately training and motivating employees to efficiently milking clean, dry, stimulated teats using proper milking hygiene.
    • Making Decisions Regarding the Balance between Milk Quality, Udder Health, and Parlor Throughput

      VanBaale, Matthew; Smith, John; Armstrong, Dennis; Harner, Joe; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-04)
      As today's dairy industry consolidates, cows are being milked more rapidly through larger milking parlors on larger dairies than ever before. Because milk is the primary commodity and source of income for producers, the harvesting of milk is the single most important job on any dairy. Producing high-quality milk to maximize yields and economic value requires effective parlor management, an enormous challenge for producers. Managing large parlors includes managing labor, milking equipment, as well as monitoring and evaluating parlor performance. Decisions concerning the milking center are some of the most complicated decisions a dairy producer has to make. Milking procedures, herd size, milking interval, the milk market, and the equity position of a producer influence these decisions. Producers will have to make the following decisions before they can select or develop management protocols for a milking parlor: 1. How many cows will be milked through the parlor? 2. What milking procedure will be used (minimal or full)? 3. If a full milking routine; how much contact time do you want (strips per teat)? 4. Which milking routine will be used (sequential, grouping, or territorial)? 5. Are you willing to train teams of milkers to operate large parlors?
    • Quality Assurance and Food Safety: Youth Manual

      Pater, Susan; Cuneo, Dr. Peder; English, James; Fish, Dean; Kock, Tim; Marchello, Dr. John; Peterson, Bob; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-02)
      The youth manual is a reference manual for the youth livestock quality assurance program. The curriculum is designed to provide youth and adults with a better understanding of the risks involved in the food production industry, better understand the good Production Practices (GPP's) that can help them produce a safer product and therefore, implement these GPP's in their own livestock production system.
    • Quality Assurance and Food Safety: Trainer's Reference

      Pater, Susan; Cuneo, Dr. Peder; English, James; Fish, Dean; Kock, Tim; Marchello, Dr. John; Peterson, Bob; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-02)
      This trainer's reference is for use in implementing the youth livestock quality assurance program. The curriculum is designed to provide youth and adults with a better understanding of the risks involved in the food production industry, better understand the Good Production Practices (GPP's) that can help them produce a safer product and therefore, implement these GPP's in their own livestock production system.
    • Quality Assurance and Food Safety: Activity Guide

      Pater, Susan; Cuneo, Dr. Peder; English, James; Fish, Dean; Kock, Tim; Marchello, Dr. John; Peterson, Bob; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-02)
      The youth manual is a reference manual for the youth livestock quality assurance program. The curriculum is designed to provide youth and adults with a better understanding of the risks involved in the food production industry, better understand the good Production Practices (GPP's) that can help them produce a safer product and therefore, implement these GPP's in their own livestock production system.
    • Thinking of Owning a Pleasure Horse? A Guide for the Care and Ownership of a Pleasure Horse in Arizona

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Schurg, William A.; Block, Kelly; Arns, Mark; Agricultural & Resource Economics (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004)
      Private horse ownership is not for everyone; owning a horse comes with many responsibilities. You must properly house and care for the horse. This care includes the horse's feeding, health care, and hoof care, but these are only part of the equation. You must also provide housing facilities, transportation, and riding equipment. This booklet is an introductory guide to the proper care and cost of owning and maintaining a pleasure horse in Arizona. We discuss how to feed and care for a horse as well as all of the associated costs to expect whether you board your horse or house and care for it privately. The publication has two major sections: (1)maintaining and caring for a horse, and (2) budgeting for the costs of ownership and care. There is also an introduction to getting started and a list of additional resources at the end.
    • Showmanship of Project Animals

      Sprinkle, Jim; Fish, Dean; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-03)
      Information to help reduce the occurrence of show ring fiascos. Focus is on proper preparation, selection, and the necessary time commitment that youth participants can expect.
    • Nutritional Characteristics of Arizona Browse

      Sprinkle, Jim; Grumbles, Rob; Meen, Art; Animal Sciences; Agriculture and Natural Resources; Natural Resources Conservation Service (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-02)
      This publication contains information about browse utilization by ruminant animals. It provides information about the rangelands in Arizona, the nutritional quality of browse, effects of drought and tannin and how to overcome them.
    • Crossbreeding Systems for Arizona Rangelands

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-11)
    • Managing Nutritional Challenges to Reproduction

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-11)
    • Heifer Development on Rangeland

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-11)
    • Protein Supplementation

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-11)
    • A Summary of Livestock Grazing Systems Used on Rangelands in the Western United States and Canada

      Howery, Larry D.; Sprinkle, James E.; Bowns, James E.; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-09)
      The objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the major grazing systems that have been used on rangelands in the western U. S. and Canada, to summarize the conditions under which they may be applicable, and to highlight examples from the southwestern U. S. when relevant.
    • Swine Nutrition for Show Animals

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-08)
      This publication discusses how to select and feed show pigs properly. It also includes a table of nutrient requirements for growing swine.
    • Collection and Storage of Agricultural Animal Wastes and Wastewater

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The greatest management concern with animal wastes is the movement of nitrate into water supplies. Health problems in humans and livestock can result from excessive levels of nitrate in drinking water. This publication outlines the guidelines to minimizing the risk of contaminating your drinking water. It also lists a number of questions to check if your management practices in the collection and storage of animal wastes may pose a risk to your groundwater.
    • Supplementation During Drought

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Breeding failure is the most important adverse consequence to the cow herd during drought. This is due to reduced forage quality and availability, resulting in nutritional stress. This publication provides information on how to supplement cattle to meet its nutrient requirements during drought.
    • How Do Domestic Herbivores Select Nutritious Diets on Rangelands?

      Howery, Larry D.; Provenza, Frederick; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Animal learning has been shown to play a major role in the development of diet selection by domestic herbivores. Dr. Frederick Provenza and his associates at Utah State University have conducted a series of experiments over the past 15 years to learn how physiological and behavioral mechanisms govern diet selection. This publication synthesizes several key diet selection concepts presented in four recent articles.
    • Understanding EPDs

      Sprinkle, Jim; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-10)
      Currently, most registered bulls have information available from their own performance records, progeny, or relatives, which enable us to predict the performance of future offspring for various traits. An expected progeny difference or EPD is the difference in some trait which one can expect when compared to other animals of the same breed. This publication explains in detail the process of using EPDs to predict the performance of future offspring of a bull.
    • Matching Forage Resources with Cow Herd Supplementation

      Sprinkle, J. E.; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1996-01)