• Drinking Water Standards

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Gasses, minerals, bacteria, metals and chemicals suspended or dissolved in water can influence the quality of the water and hence affect our health. Therefore, EPA, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has established limits on the concentration of certain drinking water contaminants allowed in public water supplies. This publication discusses drinking water standards and how these standards are set.
    • Health Effect of Drinking Water Contaminants

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Chemical contaminants occur in drinking water supplies throughout the United States, ranging from barely detectable amounts to levels that could possibly threaten human health. Determining the health effects of these contaminants is difficult, especially since researchers are still learning how chemicals react to the damaged cells. This publication addresses the issue of chemical contaminants in drinking water, topics include; acute and chronic health effects, setting standards, and treatment techniques.
    • Treatment of Household Wastewater

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Almost all farm houses use a septic tank system or similar on-site wastewater system to treat household wastewater. These systems are usually economical and safe. But, they must be able to safely handle all wastewater produced by your household and must treat wastewater adequately to prevent contamination of groundwater and surface water. This publication lists several questions to help you determine whether your household wastewater treatment system may pose a risk to your groundwater.
    • Water Wells

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The majority of people who live in rural Arizona get their drinking water from wells. If a well is not constructed or maintained properly, the water quality could be affected. This publication lists some questions to help you determine whether your drinking water has a high or low potential of becoming polluted.