• Barn Smarts for Biosecurity: Tips for Keeping Your Horse Safe and Healthy

      Greene, Elizabeth A.; Wright, Ashley Diane; Ludwig, Nicole; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-07)
      By making several simple horse care changes, you can significantly decrease your horse’s risk of exposure to disease. Using the tips below, you may prevent your horse from being exposed to sick horses while away at a show. If your horse were to bring a virus home, proper Biosecurity practices could result in just one sick horse, as opposed to a whole barn full. The intent of this article is to inject a little humor while providing key common sense tips on Biosecurity. Each tip is accompanied by an easy to remember theme and cartoon. These changes seem small but they can make a big difference in protecting the health of your horse. .
    • Collection and Storage of Agricultural Animal Wastes and Wastewater

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The greatest management concern with animal wastes is the movement of nitrate into water supplies. Health problems in humans and livestock can result from excessive levels of nitrate in drinking water. This publication outlines the guidelines to minimizing the risk of contaminating your drinking water. It also lists a number of questions to check if your management practices in the collection and storage of animal wastes may pose a risk to your groundwater.
    • Compost Tea 101: What Every Organic Gardener Should Know

      Joe, Valerisa; Rock, Channah; McLain, Jean; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      Growers of organic produce in the Southwestern United States face many challenges, including variation in water and temperature, and exposure to insects and disease. As a result, smallholder organic farmers are increasingly relying on soil additives such as compost tea that improve product quality, use less water, deter pests, and reduce reliance on chemical additives (Diver, 2002). But what exactly is compost tea? Do the benefits of using compost tea outweigh any concerns? For example, can it contain pathogens, and if so, do applicators have to worry about coming into contact with pathogens? This publication provides facts about making compost tea, and reviews both the benefits and potential disadvantages to help smallholder farmers to make educated decisions regarding the use of compost tea.
    • Cooling and Holding Eggs on the Ranch

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1951-07)
    • An Economic Survey Of Yuma Valley And Yuma Mesa Agriculture

      University of Arizona.; Agricultural Extension Service. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1932-05)
    • Electrical Equipment for Irrigation Pumps

      Halderman, Allan D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1959-06)
    • Farmer's 1953 Income Tax

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-10)
    • Fertilizer Storage and Handling

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Certain fertilizer nutrients can be harmful for animals and humans if they enter groundwater or surface water sources. Nitrate is the fertilizer nutrient that most often causes water contamination problems. This publication asks you to answer questions to help you determine whether your fertilizer storage and handling practices may pose a risk to groundwater.
    • Forage Production on Arizona Ranges, III Mohave County

      Humphrey, Robert R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964-06)
    • From GPS to GNSS: Enhanced Functionality of GPS-Integrated Systems in Agricultural Machines

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-01)
    • A General Guide to Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Hand Tools Used for Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Systems

      Franklin, Edward; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      A description of the multiple hand tools commonly used to measure energy output of solar photovoltaic (PV) silicon-type modules. These tools include a digital multi-meter to measure voltage, a clamp-on ammeter to measure current, a pyranometer to measure solar irradience, an angle finder to measure module tilt angle, a non-contact thermometer to measure solar cell temperature, and a Solar Pathfinder to evaluate a potential site for shading issues.
    • Hazardous Waste Management

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The wide variety of products commonly used in households and on farms include paints, solvents, oils, fuels, cleaners, wood preservatives, batteries, adhesives, and pesticides. Hazardous substances found in these products can contaminate groundwater if they are not used, stored, and disposed of properly. This fact sheet is taken from the Arizona Farm*A*Syst workbook. It was developed to help readers manage hazardous waste properly.
    • Manure Use and Management

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      This fact sheet is taken from the Arizona Farm *A*Syst workbook. Farm *A*Syst is a voluntary groundwater pollution prevention program designed for farmers and rural residents. This fact sheet covers information that will help you successfully apply manure and other organic wastes to crop land while keeping the groundwater safe.
    • Mound Systems: Alternative On-site Wastewater Treatment

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The conventional on-site household wastewater treatment system is known as the septic tank and absorption (leach) field. Local soil conditions; type, depth, texture and permeability all contribute to how well wastewater is treated as it moves toward groundwater. Soil conditions in parts of Arizona are not suitable for absorption fields, so alternative disposal systems are necessary. This article provides information on alternative disposal systems, the septic tank-mound system, and includes the description of the system, its background, where it should be used, and the cost and time consideration.
    • Mounting Your Solar Photovoltaic (PV) System

      Franklin, Edward A.; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      A description of different methods used in mounting solar photovoltaic (PV) modules or arrays for the residential, commercial, or agricultural user.
    • Operating Field Dusters in Arizona

      Welchert, W. T.; Roney, J. N.; Shields, I. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1958-04)
    • An Overview of Factors Determining How Milk is Priced at the Farm

      VanBaale, Matthew; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      The price farmers receive for raw (unprocessed, unpasteurized) milk is largely determined by supply and demand forces that are influenced by federal and state dairy programs. Prior to January 2000, class prices under Federal Orders (FOs) were calculated from competitive pay prices for Grade B milk in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Currently, product price formulas are in place which set the price for milk components under FOs. Milk utilization patterns in the Federal Order market area, in which farm milk is sold, dictates the type of pricing system used to determine the price received for raw milk. The state of Arizona belongs to the Arizona-Las Vegas marketing area. This marketing area encompasses all of the state of Arizona and Clark County, Nevada. This particular Federal order (131, and three others, 5, 6, & 7) use the skim milk/butterfat pricing system. The price to producers is the average of class prices weighted by market wide utilization. Uniform prices are announced at 3.5% butterfat at the base zone, which is Phoenix, for Federal Order marker 131.
    • An Overview of Risk Management Agency Insurance Products and Farm Service Agency Programs Available for Arizona Agricultural Producers as of December 2012

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Tronstad, Russell; Nakamoto, Stuart (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-01)
    • Pesticide Storage and Handling

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Pesticides are important for the agricultural industry. But they can show up where they're not wanted, such as in groundwater or surface water and hence pose health risk to humans and animals. This publication discusses the health risks pesticides cause and proper pesticide storage and handling practices.