• Farmer's 1953 Income Tax

      Unknown author (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-10)
    • Fertilizer Storage and Handling

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Certain fertilizer nutrients can be harmful for animals and humans if they enter groundwater or surface water sources. Nitrate is the fertilizer nutrient that most often causes water contamination problems. This publication asks you to answer questions to help you determine whether your fertilizer storage and handling practices may pose a risk to groundwater.
    • Forage Production on Arizona Ranges, III Mohave County

      Humphrey, Robert R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964-06)
    • From GPS to GNSS: Enhanced Functionality of GPS-Integrated Systems in Agricultural Machines

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-01)
    • A General Guide to Global Positioning Systems (GPS)

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T. (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Hand Tools Used for Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Systems

      Franklin, Edward; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      A description of the multiple hand tools commonly used to measure energy output of solar photovoltaic (PV) silicon-type modules. These tools include a digital multi-meter to measure voltage, a clamp-on ammeter to measure current, a pyranometer to measure solar irradience, an angle finder to measure module tilt angle, a non-contact thermometer to measure solar cell temperature, and a Solar Pathfinder to evaluate a potential site for shading issues.
    • Hazardous Waste Management

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The wide variety of products commonly used in households and on farms include paints, solvents, oils, fuels, cleaners, wood preservatives, batteries, adhesives, and pesticides. Hazardous substances found in these products can contaminate groundwater if they are not used, stored, and disposed of properly. This fact sheet is taken from the Arizona Farm*A*Syst workbook. It was developed to help readers manage hazardous waste properly.
    • Manure Use and Management

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      This fact sheet is taken from the Arizona Farm *A*Syst workbook. Farm *A*Syst is a voluntary groundwater pollution prevention program designed for farmers and rural residents. This fact sheet covers information that will help you successfully apply manure and other organic wastes to crop land while keeping the groundwater safe.
    • Mound Systems: Alternative On-site Wastewater Treatment

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The conventional on-site household wastewater treatment system is known as the septic tank and absorption (leach) field. Local soil conditions; type, depth, texture and permeability all contribute to how well wastewater is treated as it moves toward groundwater. Soil conditions in parts of Arizona are not suitable for absorption fields, so alternative disposal systems are necessary. This article provides information on alternative disposal systems, the septic tank-mound system, and includes the description of the system, its background, where it should be used, and the cost and time consideration.
    • Mounting Your Solar Photovoltaic (PV) System

      Franklin, Edward A.; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      A description of different methods used in mounting solar photovoltaic (PV) modules or arrays for the residential, commercial, or agricultural user.
    • Operating Field Dusters in Arizona

      Welchert, W. T.; Roney, J. N.; Shields, I. J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1958-04)
    • An Overview of Factors Determining How Milk is Priced at the Farm

      VanBaale, Matthew; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-03)
      The price farmers receive for raw (unprocessed, unpasteurized) milk is largely determined by supply and demand forces that are influenced by federal and state dairy programs. Prior to January 2000, class prices under Federal Orders (FOs) were calculated from competitive pay prices for Grade B milk in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Currently, product price formulas are in place which set the price for milk components under FOs. Milk utilization patterns in the Federal Order market area, in which farm milk is sold, dictates the type of pricing system used to determine the price received for raw milk. The state of Arizona belongs to the Arizona-Las Vegas marketing area. This marketing area encompasses all of the state of Arizona and Clark County, Nevada. This particular Federal order (131, and three others, 5, 6, & 7) use the skim milk/butterfat pricing system. The price to producers is the average of class prices weighted by market wide utilization. Uniform prices are announced at 3.5% butterfat at the base zone, which is Phoenix, for Federal Order marker 131.
    • An Overview of Risk Management Agency Insurance Products and Farm Service Agency Programs Available for Arizona Agricultural Producers as of December 2012

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Tronstad, Russell; Nakamoto, Stuart (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-01)
    • Pesticide Storage and Handling

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Pesticides are important for the agricultural industry. But they can show up where they're not wanted, such as in groundwater or surface water and hence pose health risk to humans and animals. This publication discusses the health risks pesticides cause and proper pesticide storage and handling practices.
    • Pinal County Agriculture

      Campbell, George W. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1959-04)
    • Questions to ask when planning to start a wholesale plant nursery

      Schuch, Ursula K. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-07)
      The plant nursery business is complex and requires knowledge about the technical aspects of growing plants and managing a business. This publication is an introduction for those interested in starting their own wholesale nursery business. Different types of production systems - container and field production- are discussed as well as the types of plants typically grown in Southwest nurseries. Starting a business involves many decisions that will culminate in the development of a business plan. Resources for new producers include national, regional, and local trade organizations. A worksheet with questions is included to help future operators consider whether they want to start a new wholesale production nursery. Publication AZ1393 Revised 07/2017. Originally published 2006
    • Returns From Different Systems of Farming on the Salt River Valley Irrigation Project

      Hunter, Byron; Stewart, Harry A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1929-08)
    • RV Holding-tank Treatments & Deodorizers in Septic Systems

      Farrell-Poe, Kitt; Radden, Russ; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-03)
    • Silos and Silage Crops for Arizona

      Barr, W. A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1917-11)
    • Sonic Pest Repellents

      Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
      Sonic pest devices are tools that emit sound in the attempt to repel, deter, or kill unwanted animals such as insects, rodents, birds and large mammals. There are many commercially available sonic pest devices that claim to be effective.Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available.