• Returns From Different Systems of Farming on the Salt River Valley Irrigation Project

      Hunter, Byron; Stewart, Harry A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1929-08)
    • RV Holding-tank Treatments & Deodorizers in Septic Systems

      Farrell-Poe, Kitt; Radden, Russ; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-03)
    • Silos and Silage Crops for Arizona

      Barr, W. A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1917-11)
    • Sonic Pest Repellents

      Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
      Sonic pest devices are tools that emit sound in the attempt to repel, deter, or kill unwanted animals such as insects, rodents, birds and large mammals. There are many commercially available sonic pest devices that claim to be effective.Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available.
    • Storage of Petroleum Products

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Liquid petroleum products such as gasoline, diesel, and kerosene must be stored safely to prevent leaks and spills. These products can pollute both underground and surface water sources. This publication lists several questions to help you determine whether your petroleum products storage and handling practices may pose a risk to groundwater.
    • A Successful Grain and Cattle Farm in Southern Arizona

      Clothier, R. W. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1919-11)
    • Technical Assistance Programs for Agricultural Irrigation Improvements in Arizona

      Paul, Haley; Waters, Summer; Kepler, Jason (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-09)
    • Things to Know About Applying Precision Agriculture Technologies in Arizona

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T.; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-12)
      In this publication, we will make the case of what Precision Agriculture (PA) technologies can do to enhance the productivity of farming systems, with particular attention to the case of irrigated agriculture in the semi-arid Arizona. This guide is intended to aid growers to select the right technology when considering the need to acquire new, or upgrade existing equipment.
    • Thinking of Owning a Pleasure Horse? A Guide for the Care and Ownership of a Pleasure Horse in Arizona

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Schurg, William A.; Block, Kelly; Arns, Mark; Agricultural & Resource Economics (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004)
      Private horse ownership is not for everyone; owning a horse comes with many responsibilities. You must properly house and care for the horse. This care includes the horse's feeding, health care, and hoof care, but these are only part of the equation. You must also provide housing facilities, transportation, and riding equipment. This booklet is an introductory guide to the proper care and cost of owning and maintaining a pleasure horse in Arizona. We discuss how to feed and care for a horse as well as all of the associated costs to expect whether you board your horse or house and care for it privately. The publication has two major sections: (1)maintaining and caring for a horse, and (2) budgeting for the costs of ownership and care. There is also an introduction to getting started and a list of additional resources at the end.
    • Treatment of Household Wastewater

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Almost all farm houses use a septic tank system or similar on-site wastewater system to treat household wastewater. These systems are usually economical and safe. But, they must be able to safely handle all wastewater produced by your household and must treat wastewater adequately to prevent contamination of groundwater and surface water. This publication lists several questions to help you determine whether your household wastewater treatment system may pose a risk to your groundwater.
    • The Trench Silo In Arizona

      Davis, R. N. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1932-09)
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use: Flagstaff, Arizona

      Brown, Paul; Albrecht, Wade; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-11)
      This publication is intended to be a brief Fact Sheet that provides estimates of turf consumptive use for the Flagstaff area. The publication should find utility in both irrigation management and water resource management and planning.
    • Understanding Technical Terms and Acronyms Used in Precision Agriculture

      Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John T.; Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-10)
      In this publication we make a recount of basic terms and acronyms used in describing the functionality and capabilities of precision agriculture technologies. Growers seeking to acquire new systems or upgrade their existing equipment need to be fluent in terminology used in communications, hardware, software, and other areas in order to make good decisions at the time of buying equipment. This information is also useful to educate equipment operators in the in-and-outs of this technology and this way be able to maximize the use of these expensive upgrades.
    • Water Wells

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      The majority of people who live in rural Arizona get their drinking water from wells. If a well is not constructed or maintained properly, the water quality could be affected. This publication lists some questions to help you determine whether your drinking water has a high or low potential of becoming polluted.
    • When You Buy or Build a Field Sprayer

      Akesson, Norman B.; Curley, Robert G.; Yates, W. E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1957-02)