• Calcium Supplement Guidelines

      Houtkooper, Linda; Farrell, Vanessa; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
    • Calcium Supplement Guidelines

      Houtkooper, Linda; Farrell, Vanessa A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-07)
      Calcium is an essential mineral found in great abundance in the body. Ninety-nine percent of all the calcium in the body is found in the bones and teeth. The remaining one percent is in the blood. Calcium plays important roles in nerve conduction, muscle contraction, and blood clotting. If calcium levels in the blood drop below normal, calcium will be taken from bone and put into the blood in order to maintain blood calcium levels. Therefore, it is important to consume enough calcium to maintain adequate blood and bone calcium levels. Revised 2017, Revised 2011, Original 2004
    • Calcium: A Simple Guide

      Farrell, Vanessa A.; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      It is important to know how much calcium you need to consume each day as more than 2500 mg of calcium each day can be harmful. Calcium should be obtained from foods and beverages first, then from supplements if necessary. Taking more than 500 mg of calcium at one time should be avoided. If you choose to take a calcium supplement, calcium citrate or calcium carbonate should be chosen.
    • Diabetes and Diverse Audiences

      Jackson, Ruth; Misner, Scottie; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-06)
      An overview of diabetes, signs and symptoms, risk factors, major types of diabetes and treatment are discussed.
    • Dietary Fiber

      Misner, Scottie; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-12)
      Even dietary fiber is not considered a nutrient, health professionals agree that most Americans don't get nearly enough in their diet. So, why is fiber important? what does fiber do? This article answers the questions regarding diet fiber by providing information on the practical aspects of fiber in the diet as well as food sources and their dietary fiber content.
    • Dietary Fiber

      Misner, Scottie; Whitmer, Evelyn; Florian, Traci Armstrong (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-08)
    • Eating for Bone Health

      Durrant, Lynne; Farrell, Vanessa A.; Houtkooper, Linda; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-08)
      One of the easiest ways to reduce your risk of osteoporosis is to consume adequate amounts of vitamin D and calcium in your daily diet (includes recipes).
    • Fat and Cholesterol Update

      Misner, Scottie; Curtis, Carol; Whitmer, Evelyn; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-12)
      Of all the nutrients in the food supply, fat and cholesterol probably receive the most attention from health professionals and the public alike. The scientific evidence is clear that a high-fat diet relates to chronic health problems such as heart disease, some types of cancer, diabetes, and obesity. But both fat and cholesterol are natural components of the body that are vital to good health, and too little fat in your diet is just as unhealthy as too much. This article reviews dietary fats and provides guidelines for choosing foods to balance the type and amount of fat in your diet.
    • Food Safety Associated with Cook-outs and Picnics

      Meer, Ralph; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-04)
      Warm temperatures increase the risk for food-borne illness which can spoil cook-outs and picnics. This article provides information about the necessary precautions to take in order to assure the food you serve is safe to eat.
    • Healthy Meals on the Go

      Maurer, Jaclyn; Houtkooper, Linda; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-07)
      This handout reviews healthy meal choices for active youth traveling to away sporting events. It gives examples of healthier food options from different types of restaurants.
    • Healthy Meetings!

      Hoelscher Day, Sharon; Whitmer, Evelyn; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-03)
      Why healthy meetings? Many choices go into having a successful 4-H club meeting, training, community workshop, or grower meeting. Extension staff, and volunteers should include healthy lifestyle behaviors into their education and "Walk the Talk" for healthy living in Arizona. Learn how your next meeting or event can promote healthy habits like good nutrition, physical activity and safe food.
    • Heart Disease and Diverse Audiences: What You Should Know to Lower Your Fat and Cholesterol

      Jackson, Ruth; Misner, Scottie; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-06)
      How consumers can eat to reduce their risk of heart disease by lowering fat and cholesterol in their diet.
    • Is Honey the Same as Sugar?

      Hongu, Nobuko; Suzuki, Asuka; Alcance, Klaire Angela Abalos; Martinez, Cathy L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-06)
      Both honey and sugar are carbohydrate, calorie-dense sweeteners. This article reviews similarities and differences of honey and sugar, and then answers the popular questions: “Is honey better than sugar?” and “What are cooking tips when substituting honey for sugar in recipes?”
    • Laboratories Conducting Soil, Plant, Feed, or Water Testing

      Schalau, Jeff W.; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-09)
      This publication lists laboratories that provide soil, plant, feed, and water testing within the state of Arizona. Revised September 2016.
    • Milk Upsets My Stomach

      Farrell, Vanessa A.; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      If drinking milk or eating foods made from milk, like cheese, yogurt, or ice cream, upsets your stomach then you may be lactose intolerant. Some people make too little lactase, so lactose from milk is not absorbed. There are alternatives to obtain the daily calcium if you are lactose intolerant.
    • Physical Activity for Older Adults: Tips for getting started and staying active

      Hongu, Nobuko; Gallaway, Patrick, J.; Shimada, Mieko (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
      Regular physical activity is essential for healthy aging, and most adults aged 65 years and older can safely participate in regular physical activity. This article reviews the benefits of physical activity in older adults and provides updated physical activity recommendations and tips for how to start and how to stay active for life.
    • Protein Power Play

      Maurer, Jaclyn; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-07)
      This publication provides active children and their parents information about the role protein plays in their sports nutrition diet and how to choose healthy foods to meet the protein needs of growing active children.
    • Snack Attack

      Maurer, Jaclyn; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-07)
      This publication gives active children and their parents ideas on how to choose everyday healthy snack choices to fuel them during sports.
    • Whole Grains on Your Plate

      Hongu, Nobuko; Farr, Kiah J.; Suzuki, Asuka; Grijalva, Valeria (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Studies have shown the integration of whole grains into daily diet correlates with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and cancer. This article outlines the daily dietary nutritional benefits of whole grains, as well as the positive long-term health effects associated with consistent whole grain intake in diet. Also, this article provides how to find, prepare, and utilize whole grains in everyday dietary choices. Whole grain alternative cooking recipes are introduced using relatively new whole grains (quinoa, whole wheat couscous) in typical American diets.