• Calcium and Calorie Content of Selected Foods

      Farrell, Vanessa A.; Houtkooper, Linda (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-10)
      Healthy bone growth and maintenance requires adequate calcium intake. You can meet your calcium needs from foods, beverages, and, if necessary, supplements.
    • Calcium and Calorie Content of Selected Foods

      Farrell, Vanessa A.; Houtkooper, Linda; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-08)
      Healthy bone growth and maintenance requires adequate calcium intake. You can meet your calcium needs from foods, beverages, and if necessary, supplements. This publication contains the calorie and calcium content of some foods from each group of the Food Guide Pyramid which includes bread, cereal, rice, & pasta group; vegetable group; fruit group; milk, yogurt, & cheese group; meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, & nuts group; and fats, oils & sweets.
    • Calcium Supplement Guidelines

      Houtkooper, Linda; Farrell, Vanessa A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-07)
      Calcium is an essential mineral found in great abundance in the body. Ninety-nine percent of all the calcium in the body is found in the bones and teeth. The remaining one percent is in the blood. Calcium plays important roles in nerve conduction, muscle contraction, and blood clotting. If calcium levels in the blood drop below normal, calcium will be taken from bone and put into the blood in order to maintain blood calcium levels. Therefore, it is important to consume enough calcium to maintain adequate blood and bone calcium levels. Revised 2017, Revised 2011, Original 2004
    • Calcium: A Simple Guide

      Farrell, Vanessa A.; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      It is important to know how much calcium you need to consume each day as more than 2500 mg of calcium each day can be harmful. Calcium should be obtained from foods and beverages first, then from supplements if necessary. Taking more than 500 mg of calcium at one time should be avoided. If you choose to take a calcium supplement, calcium citrate or calcium carbonate should be chosen.
    • Eating for Bone Health

      Durrant, Lynne; Farrell, Vanessa A.; Houtkooper, Linda; Nutritional Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-08)
      One of the easiest ways to reduce your risk of osteoporosis is to consume adequate amounts of vitamin D and calcium in your daily diet (includes recipes).