• Guide to Eating More Vegetables: Carrots

      Hongu, Nobuko; Suzuki, Asuka; Wilson, Hope (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
      The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend 2 to 3 cups of vegetables daily for adults. The USDA reports that more than half of our vegetable intake comes from potatoes and tomatoes, whereas only 10% comes from bright, colorful vegetables, including carrots. This article focuses on many ways to enjoy carrots, introducing different types of dishes that utilize carrots and methods of preserving them for later consumption. The nutritional value and health benefits of carrots are also explained.
    • Season For Health: A Guide For Using Herbs and Spices For Your Home Cooking

      Hongu, Nobuko; Farr, Kiah J.; Nakagomi, Yuri (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-10)
      Studies have demonstrated the health benefits of herbs and spices from antioxidant capacity, anti-inflammatory properties, and cancer-preventative or cancer-fighting properties. Additionally, herbs and spices are beneficial to reducing salt and fat intake by providing an alternative method for flavoring food. The addition or increase of herbs and spices in a regular diet may increase consumption of vegetables. This article explains the definitions of herbs and spices, as well as the positive health benefits associated with both. This article also outlines how to find and incorporate many herbs and spices available to Arizonans and the surrounding community into everyday diet, while including the affordability of each.
    • Pest-proofing Your Home

      Gouge, Dawn H.; Nair, Shaku; Li, Shujuan; Stock, Tim (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
      Many pests encountered in homes and structures can be prevented by using simple techniques collectively known as “pest-proofing”. If done correctly, pest-proofing your home saves you money by reducing pest management costs, and more importantly, reduces potential pesticide exposure. This publication describes general indoor and outdoor pest-proofing measures and some of the major pests encountered in and around homes and structures.
    • Physical Activity for Older Adults: Tips for getting started and staying active

      Hongu, Nobuko; Gallaway, Patrick, J.; Shimada, Mieko (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-08)
      Regular physical activity is essential for healthy aging, and most adults aged 65 years and older can safely participate in regular physical activity. This article reviews the benefits of physical activity in older adults and provides updated physical activity recommendations and tips for how to start and how to stay active for life.
    • Agricultural Use of Recycled Water for Crop Production in Arizona

      Cusimano, Jeremy; McLain, Jean E.; Eden, Susanna; Rock, Channah M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      Agriculture is by far the largest water-demanding sector in Arizona, accounting for 70% of water demand (ADWR, 2009). Arizona’s agriculture industry is extremely diversified, producing many crops that can legally be irrigated with recycled water, including cotton, alfalfa, wheat, citrus, and vegetables. Throughout the State, farming communities are taking advantage of increasing supplies of recycled water.
    • Food Product Dating and Storage Times

      Armstrong Florian, Traci L.; Misner, Scottie (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      Nutritious food is an important part of individual health and wellness. One way to ensure food is nutritious is to check the date on packages. The date is a guideline to help consumers use food when it is at its peak quality or before spoilage begins. Proper storage conditions and times are also essential in keeping healthy food safe to consume.
    • Local Foods in Arizona

      Hongu, Nobuko; Turner, Rachel J.; Gallaway, Patrick J.; Suzuki, Asuka; Gonsalves, Kimberly A.; Martinez, Cathy L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-05)
      More and more consumers are choosing to buy locally produced foods. Locally grown foods are, fresher, contain more nutrients if picked at full ripeness, and are considered by many consumers to be better tasting than foods that have endured many miles of transportation. Consuming local produce may help communities by stimulating local economies and protecting the environment. This article outlines the benefits of buying locally grown foods. A recipe that is easy and affordable using some local produce is included. A calendar of seasonal produce in Arizona is included in the Appendix.
    • The Economic Contribution of University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) Spending to the State of Arizona

      Kerna, Ashley; Frisvold, George; Jacobs, Laurel; Farrell, Vanessa A.; Houtkooper, Linda; Misner, Scottie (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      The University of Arizona Cooperative Extension SNAP-Ed program contributes to the Arizona economy by bringing funds from outside the state and utilizing them to encourage healthy eating and active living for people in low-income households. Purchases made for conducting this work generate a ripple of economic activity in other Arizona industries. Economists call these the indirect and induced multiplier effects. This report summarizes the total economic contribution of SNAP-Ed spending, including multiplier effects, on the Arizona economy for the years 2011 and 2012.
    • Okra

      Hongu, Nobuko; Franklin, Alexandra M.; Suzuki, Asuka (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      Okra is a popular vegetable frequently found in Southern dishes. Outside of the South, okra can be hard to find. Usually okra appears during the summer at farmers markets and specialty health stores. Okra is a rich source of many nutrients, including fiber. This article outlines the nutritional benefits of okra and provides tips for how to select, store, and cook okra as well as how to grow okra in your home garden. Two of our favorite cooking methods – roasting and sautéing okra are introduced.
    • Working with Non-Profit Organizations – Cooperative Extension’s Opportunity to Expand Its Reach

      Apel, Mark B.; Warren, Peter L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-12)
      This article describes the advantages and benefits of collaborations between Cooperative Extension and non-profit organizations in terms of increasing Extension's outreach capacity and assisting non-profits. Guidelines are provided for Extension personnel interested in working with non-profits.
    • Mesquite: It's Food

      Wyatt, Melissa Ann; Dawley, Martina M.; Hongu, Nobuko (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-11)
      Mesquite trees can be used as a food source. There are forty-four species of mesquite tree found throughout the world. The Sonoran desert region has three native species of mesquite: the honey, screwbean, and velvet mesquite. Mesquite pods have been used by indigenous groups in the area as a food source for many generations. The pods can be ground into flour or cooked whole in water to produce beverages. The article provides the best practice guide for making your own mesquite flour and introduces several original cooking recipes.
    • Dairy Foods: Providing Essential Nutrients & Promoting Good Health Throughout Life

      Hongu, Nobuko; Tsui, Chiayi; Wise, Jamie M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-11)
      Dairy foods including milk, yogurt, cheese, and fortified soymilk provide nine essential nutrients that both children and adults can enjoy. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend consuming 3 cups per day of fat-free (skim), reduced fat (2%), low fat (1%), or equivalent milk products for healthy adults and children 9 years of age and older. We describe healthy ways to incorporate daily foods into the diet. Delicious and easy recipes using skim milk are also included.
    • Sonic Pest Repellents

      Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available. As our understanding increases of how pest species receive and process sound, more relevant sonic devices may be developed. The allure of sound as a treatment for pests will remain into the future—motivated by the fact that if they are successful they will be more environmentally friendly and safer for humans.
    • Buying Locally Grown and Eating Seasonally in Arizona

      Hongu, Nobuko; Turner, Rachel J.; Martinez, Cathy L.; Suzuki, Asuka; Gonsalves, Kimberly A. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      More and more consumers are choosing to buy locally produced foods. Health and environment conscious consumers believe locally grown foods are healthier, fresher, and are better tasting than foods that have endured many miles of transport. Buying locally also helps communities by stimulating local economies and protecting the environment. This article outlines the benefits of buying locally grown food and eating seasonally in Arizona. A recipe that is easy and affordable using local produce is included. An Arizona seasonal produce availability calendar is included in the Appendix.
    • Whole Grains on Your Plate

      Hongu, Nobuko; Farr, Kiah J.; Suzuki, Asuka; Grijalva, Valeria (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Studies have shown the integration of whole grains into daily diet correlates with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and cancer. This article outlines the daily dietary nutritional benefits of whole grains, as well as the positive long-term health effects associated with consistent whole grain intake in diet. Also, this article provides how to find, prepare, and utilize whole grains in everyday dietary choices. Whole grain alternative cooking recipes are introduced using relatively new whole grains (quinoa, whole wheat couscous) in typical American diets.
    • GPS Watches for Measuring Energy Expenditure during Physical Activity

      Hongu, Nobuko; Wise, Jamie M.; Orr, Barron J.; Wisneski, Kristin D. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      Recently, a number of global positioning system (GPS) devices have been introduced commercially which exploit GPS, transforming frequent measurements of time and location, into an estimate of energy expenditure. This fact sheet reviews how GPS watches (GPS fitness units) measure energy expenditure of individual during physical activity. We list popular GPS watches that are on the market and show pros and cons of these watches. After our field testing, we decided that the Garmin Forerunner 305 is our best pick for the GPS watch. We included information on geocaching, which is one of several popular outdoor activities using a GPS receiver or other navigational techniques.
    • Reading the Nutrition Facts Label: Step-by-Step Approach

      Hongu, Nobuko; Wise, Jamie M. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      Food labels are designed to help consumers to make healthy food choices. Yet the Nutrition Facts label is not always easy to understand, due to a lot of technical information. The step-by-step approach in this publication is easy to follow, and may help consumers to build skills how to read and use the information on a Nutrition Facts label more easily and effectively for their needs. This two page information sheet is useful, especially when a nutrition educator teaches a lay person those tricky foods labeling terms and recommends healthy alternative in his/her diet.
    • Healthy Fats: Tips for Improving the Quality of Fat Intake

      Hongu, Nobuko; Wise, Jamie M.; Gallaway, Patrick J. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      The article provides information about different types of dietary fats and promotes consumption of healthy fats in moderation as part of a balanced diet. The prevalence of fat-free products in grocery stores may give some health-conscious consumers the perception that all dietary fats are unhealthy. However, fats are absolutely vital for proper physiological functioning, and it is imperative that fats are included in a healthy diet. Fats are classified as saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated. Both types of unsaturated fats, when consumed in moderation, can help lower cholesterol and decrease the risk of heart disease, especially when they replace saturated and trans fats. We provide tips for selecting healthier fats, along with a guide for consuming appropriate portions of fat.
    • Making Healthier Foods and Physical Activity Choices with SuperTracker

      Hongu, Nobuko; Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-02)
      The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported that over two million Americans are using USDA’s SuperTracker (Kevin Concannon, Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services; March 27, 2013). SuperTracker is an online, interactive tool with which users can create customized healthy dietary and physical activity plans. It can help users analyze their dietary trends and assess whether they are achieving their dietary and physical activity goals. In addition to users’ planning, assessment, and analysis, SuperTracker offers personal goal setting and journaling – recording daily events. This article walks you through the basics of SuperTracker.
    • School Garden Food Safety Guidelines

      Pastor, Monica; Schimke, Ashley; Eckles, Diane; UA CALS Cooperative Extension; Arizona Department of Education; Arizona Department of Health Services (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-09)