• The American Hornet Moth in the Urban Forests of Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      Information about life cycle and damage in aspens, poplars and willows found especially in Arizona and their control methods.
    • Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-01)
      This article provides information about how to use annual flowers in Northern Arizona. It describes how to plan a garden, plant flowers and prepare soil. It lists out many of the common annual flowers that perfrom well in higher elevations in Arizona.
    • Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert E; Kilby, Michael; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      The mid elevations (3,500 to 6,000 feet) in Arizona can be ideal for growing tree fruit. Site selection can make a pronounced effect on how well fruit will grow and produce. The warmer the site the greater the chance of success. Areas where cold air settles are a poor choice for tree fruit production. Variety selection is very important for good fruit production.February and March are the best months to plant bare root trees, although they can be planted anytime during the dormant season. Try to plant 30 days before bud break. Containerized plants are best planted in late September through early October. The open center pruning system allows for more sunlight to reach all the branches of the tree. Whereas the central leader is used with those trees that are less vigorous. Training trees when young is an important step in ensuring a strong scaffold system when bearing. Fruit thinning helps to control fruit size and consistent bearing. Proper fertilization, irrigation, and pest control will promote healthy productive trees.
    • Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape

      DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-09)
      Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
    • Cooley Spruce Gall Adelgid in Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      This publication provides information and describes Cooley spruce galls in Northern Arizona. Douglas-fir and spruce are alternate hosts for these galls. The life cycle of galls and their management/control methods are described in detail here.
    • Drift Resulting from Ground-based Sprays of Carbaryl to Protect Individual Trees from Bark Beetle Attack in the Western United States

      DeGomez, Tom; Fettig, Christopher J.; Munson, Steven; McKelvey, Stephen R.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      A common method of protecting individual trees from bark beetle attack in the western U.S. is to saturate the tree bole with carbaryl using a hydraulic sprayer at high pressure. With this type of application method spray deposition will occur off-target and may contact open waters where sensitive species are subject to the toxic effects of the pesticide. We report on a recent study in which the authors reported carbaryl drift resulting from single tree protection treatments poses little threat to adjacent aquatic environments, a primary concern when treating trees in campgrounds in the Western United States. Using reasonable no-spray buffers will ensure that adjacent aquatic environments are protected from any negative impacts.
    • Fertilizing Home Gardens in Arizona

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-02)
      Gardens provide excellent quality vegetables for fresh use and for processing if the crops are supplied with an adequate level of nutrients and water. Other important management practices include plant spacing, insect, weed, and disease control, and timely harvest. This publication provides a fertilizer guide for vegetable gardens at ensuring ample levels of all nutrients for optimum yield and quality.
    • Ground Covers for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Ground Covers for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
      Ground covers can be any low-growing, creeping, sprawling plant whose primary purpose is to cover the ground in managed landscapes. General planting instructions, their care, selection and cultural requirements used in ground cover and explained in this article in detail.
    • Growing Strawberries in Home Gardens

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-06)
      Strawberries are easy to grow. They provide the first fruit of the season, and are quick to bear. When harvested fully ripe in the home garden they have excellent flavor. In stores they can be expensive and are often harvested prior to being fully ripe. Various types of strawberries are available. Each type has specific environmental requirements such as temperature and hours of daylight for good production. With the wide range of climatic zones in Arizona it is important to choose the right type of strawberry for your growing conditions.
    • Growing Tomatoes above 6000 Foot Elevations in Arizona

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-02)
      This publication provides information and describes steps of growing tomatoes in higher elevations in Arizona. It explains how to start plants from their seeds, how to choose plants and grow them indoors as well as outdoors. It gives a brief description of the pests that could attack these plants and methods of controlling them.
    • Oystershell Scale in Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      This publication provides information and describes Oystershell Scale in Northern Arizona. The feeding habits, life cycle of scales and their management/control methods are described in detail here.
    • Perennials for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-01)
      This article provides information about perennials in Northern Arizona. It describes planting them, preparing the soil, irrigation, mulching, fertilizing, etc.. It lists out many of the perennials and gives information about each of their growing conditions and their use.
    • Perennials for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Pine bark beetles in Arizona are generally of the genus Ips or Dendroctonus. Fading foliage in the tree is often the first sign of a beetle attack. Prevention is best practiced since control is not possible once the beetles have successfully colonized the tree. Colonization is dependent upon trees being in a vulnerable condition caused by stress from various agents and site conditions.
    • Plant Selection and Selecting Your Plants

      Davison, Elisabeth; Begeman, John; Tipton, Jimmy; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Whether you are beginning a new landscape or renovating an existing one, planning ahead can prevent many problems. The majority of maintenance requirements and plant problems result from either selecting the wrong kind of plant for a location or planting an inferior specimen of the selected plant type. In other words, there are two decisions to be made: ▪ What species, or kind, of tree are you going to buy — an oak, pine, mesquite, or acacia? ▪ Assuming you decide on an oak, which one in the row of oaks at the nursery are you going to buy? The first decision is called Plant Selection and the second is Selecting Plants. Our goal is to install the right plant in the right place. This publication will cover the factors involved in making good decisions to achieve this goal.
    • Pruning Deciduous Shade Trees

      Davison, Elisabeth; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      The pruning principles discussed in this publication have proven to provide the best possible out comes including tree longevity and safety. Although trees may live for years following improper pruning their life span and safety may be severely reduced. We encourage proper pruning so that the trees we care for may bring us pleasure for many years.
    • Pruning Evergreen Shrubs

      Fazio, Steve; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Evergreen shrubs used to landscape the home grounds should be permitted to grow and develop into their natural shapes. Natural growing shrubs lend a pleasing look to the home grounds. This does not mean that we cannot prune to keep them within limited bounds, but we should definitely not prune to formal shapes such as globes, squares or pyramids. If they are pruned in this manner, they must be constantly sheared to maintain these shapes.
    • Pruning Hedges to Provide Screening

      Fazio, Steve; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      An ideal hedge for screening patio areas should have dense foliage from the base to the very top of the plants. In order to develop a hedge with these qualities, the gardener should prune the plants in such a manner as to encourage the plants to develop branches and leaves at the lower portion at the time of planting and until the desired height is reached. The procedures for pruning shrubs are simple, but in many instances the basic principles are overlooked or not put into practice simply because the gardener does not want to sacrifice the growth of the plants before they reach the desired height.