• The American Hornet Moth in the Urban Forests of Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      Information about life cycle and damage in aspens, poplars and willows found especially in Arizona and their control methods.
    • Common Insect Contaminants Found in Arizona Lettuce

      Kerns, David L.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication describes the common insects found in Arizona lettuce through the use of pictures. The insects include; lepidopterous larva, striped flea beetle, leafminer fly, leafminer mine, adult western flower thrips, winged adult aphid, false chinch bug, lygus bug, potato leafhopper, and threecornered alfalfa hopper.
    • The Conenose Bug (AKA "The Kissing Bug")

      Cordell, Susan; Baxter, TP; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-05)
      One would not suspect that an insect with the congenial nickname of kissing bug could cause life-threatening allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) in sensitive individuals. But anaphylactic shock can be the result of the bite of Triatoma species, also known as the conenose bug, kissing bug, assassin bug, Mexican bedbug, and the Wallapai tiger. This publication discusses the identification, habitat, and the conenose bite of this insect, as well as the controlling method used to reduce theie numbers.
    • Cooley Spruce Gall Adelgid in Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      This publication provides information and describes Cooley spruce galls in Northern Arizona. Douglas-fir and spruce are alternate hosts for these galls. The life cycle of galls and their management/control methods are described in detail here.
    • Cricket Management

      Bradley, Lucy; Gibson, Roberta; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-04)
      Indian house crickets and field crickets are the two most common crickets in Arizona. Although these crickets do not bite or carry diseases, they are considered a nuisance because of their "chirping". This publication focuses on common crickets found in Arizona, including the Indian house crickets, field crickets, and Jerusalem crickets. It also discusses the problems they cause and the strategies to control them.
    • Cypress Bark Beetles

      Schalau, Jeff; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-06)
      Cypress bark beetles are native insects that often impact ornamental Arizona cypress and Leyland cypress trees. Healthy, vigorous cypress trees can usually withstand substantial beetle pressure. However, significant mortality of host tree species often occurs during periods of extended drought. Tree vigor can easily be maintained through deep, infrequent irrigation during drought periods.
    • Drift Resulting from Ground-based Sprays of Carbaryl to Protect Individual Trees from Bark Beetle Attack in the Western United States

      DeGomez, Tom; Fettig, Christopher J.; Munson, Steven; McKelvey, Stephen R.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      A common method of protecting individual trees from bark beetle attack in the western U.S. is to saturate the tree bole with carbaryl using a hydraulic sprayer at high pressure. With this type of application method spray deposition will occur off-target and may contact open waters where sensitive species are subject to the toxic effects of the pesticide. We report on a recent study in which the authors reported carbaryl drift resulting from single tree protection treatments poses little threat to adjacent aquatic environments, a primary concern when treating trees in campgrounds in the Western United States. Using reasonable no-spray buffers will ensure that adjacent aquatic environments are protected from any negative impacts.
    • Oystershell Scale in Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      This publication provides information and describes Oystershell Scale in Northern Arizona. The feeding habits, life cycle of scales and their management/control methods are described in detail here.
    • Pinyon Needle Scale

      Schalau, Jeff; Young, Deborah; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-06)
      Pinyon needle scale (Matsucoccus acalyptus) are very small (0.5 mm) sucking insects that feed on pinyon, singleleaf pinyon, and foxtail pines in the southwestern United States. These insects can be effectively controlled using an integrated approach which includes sanitation, supplemental irrigation, and pesticides.
    • Tent Caterpillars in Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-02)
      This publication provides information and describes tent caterpillars in Northern Arizona. The feeding habits, life cycle of scales and their management/control methods are described in detail here.