• Cactus, Agave, Yucca and Ocotillo

      Kelly, Jack; Grumbles, Rob; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-04)
    • Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape

      DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-09)
      Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
    • Converting Turf to a Xeriscape Landscape: How To Eliminate a Bermudagrass Lawn Using Glyphosate

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-09)
      The most difficult part of conversion from a lawn to a low water (xeriscape) landscape is the removal of a lawn. By removing a Bermuda grass lawn, it is estimated that water savings of 50 -75% is possible. Potential water savings comes from the fact that water is applied to a limited amount of total yard space, compared to the greater water needs of a continuous grass-covered area. Also, by planting low water use plants, less maintenance is required and substantial cost savings can be realized. Turf removal and subsequent weed suppression is achievable using readily available herbicides.
    • Diagnosing Problems of Roses in the Landscape

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-09)
      This publication contains guidelines for identifying and managing pests and diseases of Roses.
    • How to Propagate Agaves and Cacti from Cuttings and Seed

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-01)
      Propagation of agaves and cacti from seed and cuttings is an easy-to-accomplish process. Cuttings and seed sown during the appropriate time of year using the methods discussed will produce numerous progeny.
    • How to Transplant a Cactus

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-09)
      Barrel cactus and Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea) are easily transplanted. Procedures for safely and succesfully moving these plants are discussed in this bulletin.
    • Managing Caliche in the Home Yard

      Kelly, Jack; Walworth, Jim; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-03)
    • Mesquite and Palo Verde Trees for the Urban Landscape

      Schuch, Ursula; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-01)
      This publication describes gorwth habit and charactersitics of mequite and palo verde trees for the urban landscape. Culture and problems are discussed.
    • Pines of Arizona

      Jones, Christoper; Kelly, Jack (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-06)
    • Problems and Pests of Agave, Aloe, Cactus and Yucca

      Kelly, Jack; Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-03)
      Cacti, agaves and yuccas are classified as succulents, plants that have highly specialized anatomical features such as thick waxy cuticles, fleshy or minimal leaves, modified leaves (spines), and roots with extra storage capabilities for food and water. These modifications allow them to survive and thrive in harsh desert environments. They survive long periods of drought in areas of sparse rainfall and intense heat. During stressful periods, many succulents cease to grow, drop unnecessary leaves, dehydrate and become dormant until conditions for growth return. Despite their adaptations, succulents suffer from diseases, insect pests and cultural problems. Some of the more common problems that occur in cacti, agave and yuccas in Arizona are discussed in this bulletin.
    • Selecting, Planting and Staking Trees (PowerPoint)

      Schuch, Ursula; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-03)
      This slide set with accompanying notes is intended to educate profesisonals in the nursery and landscape trade and lay people interested in proper horticultural practices related to selecting, planting and staking trees.