• Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert; Kilby, Michael; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication discusses some backyard fruits that can be grown at elevations between 3500 to 6000 feet and also lists varieties of each fruit by harvest season.
    • Cotton (Texas) Root Rot

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Cotton root rot commonly causes a sudden wilt and death of susceptible plants in summer months but may also cause a slow decline, especially at cooler temperatures. So, positive identification of disease by an experienced person is essential. This publication addresses the symptoms, environmental conditions, disease, prevention and control methods, sampling, identifying susceptible plants and the tolerant and immune plants of cotton root rot.
    • Damping Off

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Damping off is caused by several different fungi under different environmental conditions. The fungi include Pythium, Rhizoctonia solani, and Thielaviopsis basicola. This article discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, diseases, prevention and control methods for the damping-off caused by fungi.
    • Diseases of Urban Plants in Arizona

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-04)
      Geographically, Arizona can be divided roughly into four areas, southwest, central, southeast, and northern. These regions correspond with four climatic zones, allowing a large and diverse number of plants to be grown for landscaping purposes. But, interestingly, in this desert environment many of the parasitic diseases in landscape plants are caused by a limited number of plant pathogens. This publication discusses some of those diseases that are sufficiently important to the urban plants in all areas Arizona.
    • Fire Blight

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Fireblight is a bacterial disease that affects only plants in the rose family, particularly apple, pear and pyracantha. This article briefly discusses the symptoms and environmental conditions for this disease and the way to control it.
    • Powdery Mildew

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Powdery mildew, a plant disease, appears as white, powdery spots on the leaf surface of several different kinds of plants. They are specific to their hosts and one type will infect only certain plants, usually those in the same or closely related plant families. This publication discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, disease of powdery mildew and the methods used to prevent / control this plant disease.
    • Sooty Canker

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Sooty canker causes cankers and dieback in tree branches. This article briefly explains the host, symptoms, environmental conditions, disease and preventing / controlling method for sooty canker.
    • Verticillium Wilt

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Verticillium Wilt causes wilting and yellowing of leaves, death of limbs, often on one side or a portion of the plant. This article provides information on the disease caused by Verticillium Wilt including the host, symptoms, environmental conditions, disease and the preventing / controlling method.