• Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-01)
      This article provides information about how to use annual flowers in Northern Arizona. It describes how to plan a garden, plant flowers and prepare soil. It lists out many of the common annual flowers that perfrom well in higher elevations in Arizona.
    • Arizona Landscape Palms

      Davison, Elizabeth; Begeman, John; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-12)
      The luxuriant tropical appearance and stately silhouette of palms add much to the Arizona landscape. Few other plants are as striking in low and mid elevation gardens. Although winter frosts and low humidity limit the choices somewhat, a good number of palms are available, ranging from the dwarf Mediterranean fan palm to the massive Canary Island date palm. This publication addresses the landscape use and the adaption of palms, as well as how to plant and take care of them. Topics include: . Landscape Use . Adaptation . Planting Palms . Care of Established Palms . Diseases and Insect Pests . Palms for Arizona . Feather Palms . Fan Palms . Palm-like Plants
    • Arizona Plant Climate Zones

      Davison, Elizabeth; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-03)
    • Budding Citrus Trees

      Wright, Glenn C.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      Citrus budding is a plant propagation technique that any homeowner can do. Once the technique is learned, homeowners can add citrus tree. This publication addresses the budding techniques of citrus trees. Topics include the preparation prior to budding, selecting budsticks, storing budsticks, selecting and preparing the budding location, cutting the bud, inserting the bud in the t cut, and forcing the bud.
    • Cactus, Agave, Yucca and Ocotillo

      Kelly, Jack; Grumbles, Rob; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-04)
    • Camelthorn: A Homeowners Guide

      Norton, Eric; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-01)
      Camelthorn is an invasive weed classified as a noxious weed in Arizona. The weed has the potential to cause serious damage for private landowners and their property. This fact sheet provides the means for landowners to identify and take steps to control and eliminate this weed.
    • Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape

      DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-09)
      Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
    • Converting Turf to a Xeriscape Landscape: How To Eliminate a Bermudagrass Lawn Using Glyphosate

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-09)
      The most difficult part of conversion from a lawn to a low water (xeriscape) landscape is the removal of a lawn. By removing a Bermuda grass lawn, it is estimated that water savings of 50 -75% is possible. Potential water savings comes from the fact that water is applied to a limited amount of total yard space, compared to the greater water needs of a continuous grass-covered area. Also, by planting low water use plants, less maintenance is required and substantial cost savings can be realized. Turf removal and subsequent weed suppression is achievable using readily available herbicides.
    • Deciduous Fruit and Nuts for the Low Desert

      Bradley, Lucy; Maurer, Michael; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-03)
    • Deer and Rabbit Resistant Plants

      Schalau, Jeff; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-01)
      This list suggests some plant species which seem to be less palatable to deer and rabbits.
    • Diagnosing Home Citrus Problems

      Wright, Glenn C.; Begeman, John; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-04)
      Diagnosing Home Citrus Problems includes information on all the commonly encountered dooryard citrus problems encountered in Arizona. Problems/disorders are grouped into three catagories: problems with fruit, problems with leaves, and problems with stems, branches and entire tree. Symptoms, causes and control measures are given for each disorder.
    • Diagnosing Problems of Roses in the Landscape

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-09)
      This publication contains guidelines for identifying and managing pests and diseases of Roses.
    • Drought Tolerant Trees for Mid-elevation Deserts of Arizona (3,000 to 4,000 feet)

      Schalau, Jeff; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-07)
    • Fertilizing Home Gardens in Arizona

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-02)
      Gardens provide excellent quality vegetables for fresh use and for processing if the crops are supplied with an adequate level of nutrients and water. Other important management practices include plant spacing, insect, weed, and disease control, and timely harvest. This publication provides a fertilizer guide for vegetable gardens at ensuring ample levels of all nutrients for optimum yield and quality.
    • Flower Planting Guide for the Low Desert

      Bradley, Lucy; Cromell, Cathy; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-04)
      Includes tables for choosing flowers based on color, height, days from seed to bloom, light needs, water needs, growing difficulty, lures, and special characteristics. Also includes planting and flowering dates.
    • Frost Protection

      Bradley, Lucy; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-04)
      The variation of the first and the last frost date is due to differences in elevation, density of population and several other factor, including a variation in temperature from year to year. All these variations make it more difficult to protect plants. To adequately protect your plants from frost damage you need to understand cold weather; how plants respond to cold; how heat is transferred; how to prevent frost damage; symptoms of frost damage and how to care for plants that have been damaged by frost.
    • Ground Covers for Arizona Landscapes

      Davison, Elizabeth; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-04)
      Ground covers are usually creeping, sprawling or clumping plants whose primary function is to cover the ground in man-made landscapes. They can also include low growing shrubs and perennials, if they spread to cover the area. Plants suitable for this use come in a wide range of shapes, sizes, textures and colors. This publication addresses the issues related to ground cover plants. Topics include; why we use a ground cover, caveats, how to select a ground cover, general planting instructions, care of established plants, watering and exposure. It also includes a plant climate zone map and a plant list.
    • Ground Covers for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
      Ground covers can be any low-growing, creeping, sprawling plant whose primary purpose is to cover the ground in managed landscapes. General planting instructions, their care, selection and cultural requirements used in ground cover and explained in this article in detail.
    • Growing Blackberries in the Low Desert

      Wright, Glenn C.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-03)
      A homeowner's guide for growing blackberries in the low desert.
    • Growing Tomatoes above 6000 Foot Elevations in Arizona

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-02)
      This publication provides information and describes steps of growing tomatoes in higher elevations in Arizona. It explains how to start plants from their seeds, how to choose plants and grow them indoors as well as outdoors. It gives a brief description of the pests that could attack these plants and methods of controlling them.