• Aphids

      Warren, Peter L.; Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      A description of aphids, the damage they cause, their lifecycle, and management recommendations.
    • Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape

      DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-09)
      Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
    • Cut Stump Application of Herbicides to Manage Woody Vegetation

      Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Cut Stump Application of Herbicides to Manage Woody Vegetation

      Schalau, Jeff; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-04)
      Persistent woody plants can sometimes conflict with gardening and landscape goals. In many cases, plant removal becomes necessary. This may be accomplished through manual stump removal or the use of herbicides. With some knowledge of the life history of the target plant, cut stumps can be safely and effectively treated with herbicides to prevent regrowth. Species lists, safety tips, examples, photos, and non-herbicide alternatives are provided to ensure optimum stump killing success.
    • Cypress Bark Beetles

      Schalau, Jeff; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-06)
      Cypress bark beetles are native insects that often impact ornamental Arizona cypress and Leyland cypress trees. Healthy, vigorous cypress trees can usually withstand substantial beetle pressure. However, significant mortality of host tree species often occurs during periods of extended drought. Tree vigor can easily be maintained through deep, infrequent irrigation during drought periods.
    • Deer and Rabbit Resistant Plants

      Schalau, Jeff; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-01)
      This list suggests some plant species which seem to be less palatable to deer and rabbits.
    • Drought Tolerant Trees for Mid-elevation Deserts of Arizona (3,000 to 4,000 feet)

      Schalau, Jeff; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2001-07)
    • Javelina Resistant Plants

      Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-09-18)
      The plants on this list represent plants less likely to be eaten by javelina. Reviewed 10/2016. Originally published 2001.
    • Javelina Resistant Plants

      Schalau, Jeff; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-01)
      The plants on this list represent plants less likely to be eaten by javelina.
    • Laboratories Conducting Soil, Plant, Feed, or Water Testing

      Schalau, Jeff; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-05)
      This sheet contains the mailing information for the labs that conduct soil, plant, feed or water testing.
    • Pinyon Needle Scale

      Schalau, Jeff; Young, Deborah; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-06)
      Pinyon needle scale (Matsucoccus acalyptus) are very small (0.5 mm) sucking insects that feed on pinyon, singleleaf pinyon, and foxtail pines in the southwestern United States. These insects can be effectively controlled using an integrated approach which includes sanitation, supplemental irrigation, and pesticides.
    • Planting Pole Cuttings in Riparian Ecosystems

      Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-08)
      Riparian ecosystems are found in the transition between aquatic and adjacent terrestrial ecosystems where unique vegetative communities can occur due to free water at or near the soil surface. A healthy, functional riparian plant community provides a rich environment for insects, mollusks, amphibians, reptiles, fishes, birds, and animals. In Arizona, many naturally occurring riparian ecosystems have been impacted, altered or removed by natural processes and land management activities. This publication provides information to assist residents, landowners, and agency personnel in successfully establishing pole plantings in riparian ecosystems of Arizona. Reviewed 10/2016, Originally published 2000.
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use: Prescott, Arizona

      Brown, Paul; Schalau, Jeff; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-11)
      This publication is intended as a brief Fact Sheet that provides estimates of turfgrass consumptive use for Prescott.