• Care of Desert-Adapted Plants

      Waterfall, Patricia; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998)
      Arid urban environment increases the potential insect problems in shrubs and trees. Urban stress conditions include extreme temperatures, salty irrigation water, and heavy soils. Further, many trees and shrubs available in nurseries are not adapted to these arid climates. This publication discusses in detail how to prevent or reduce insect and disease problems for desert-adapted plants by following proper planting, pruning, irrigation, and weed control practices.
    • Fertilizer Storage and Handling

      Hassinger, Elaine; Watson, Jack; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-05)
      Certain fertilizer nutrients can be harmful for animals and humans if they enter groundwater or surface water sources. Nitrate is the fertilizer nutrient that most often causes water contamination problems. This publication asks you to answer questions to help you determine whether your fertilizer storage and handling practices may pose a risk to groundwater.
    • Harvesting Rainwater for Landscape Use

      Waterfall, Patricia; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004-10)
      In the arid Southwest, rainfall is scarce and evapotranspiration rates are high. Only natives and some desert-adapted plants can live on 10 or 11 inches of annual rainfall. Other plants require some supplemental irrigation and harvesting rainwater can reduce the use of drinking water for landscape irrigation. This publication discusses the water requirements for some plants and the way to collect rainwater. Its topics include: - Water Harvesting System Components - Simple Water Harvesting System Design and Construction - Complex Water Harvesting Systems
    • Harvesting Rainwater for Landscape Use

      Waterfall, Patricia; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006)
      In the arid Southwest, rainfall is scarce and evapotranspiration rates are high. Only natives and some desert-adapted plants can live on 10 or 11 inches of annual rainfall. Other plants require some supplemental irrigation and harvesting rainwater can reduce the use of drinking water for landscape irrigation. This publication discusses the water requirements for some plants and the way to collect rainwater. Its topics include: - Water Harvesting System Components - Simple Water Harvesting System Design and Construction - Complex Water Harvesting Systems
    • Phoenix Area Turf Water Management Information

      Brown, Paul; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-09)
      Phoenix area turf managers now have access to FREE turf water use information via fax, email or the Internet. This free service is provided by the Arizona Meteorological Network (AZMET) which generates turf water use estimates using data collected from a network of automated weather stations located in the Phoenix area. Signing up for this free service is very easy. This publication provides the details you need to sign up for this free turf water use information service in the Phoenix area.
    • Recognizing and Treating Iron Deficiency in the Home Yard

      Walworth, James; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-07)
      Iron deficiency is a frequent problem in ornamental plants in the desert areas of southern Arizona.
    • Soil Sampling and Analysis

      Walworth, James; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-07)
      Soil testing is comprised of four steps: Collection of a representative soil sample, laboratory analyses of the soil sample, interpretation of analytical results, and management recommendations based on interpreted analytical results.
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use Values for the Phoenix Area

      Brown, Paul; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-04)
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use Values for the Tucson Area

      Brown, Paul; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-04)
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use: Flagstaff, Arizona

      Brown, Paul; Albrecht, Wade; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-11)
      This publication is intended to be a brief Fact Sheet that provides estimates of turf consumptive use for the Flagstaff area. The publication should find utility in both irrigation management and water resource management and planning.
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use: Mohave County, Arizona

      Brown, Paul; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2008-02)
      This Extension Bulletin is similar to others previously completed for Tucson, Phoenix, Flagstaff, Prescott and Payson. The bulletin provides information on turfgrass consumptive use for the River Cities (Bullhead, Lake Havasu, etc.) and Kingman areas. Consumptive use is provided for each month of the year in units of inches/month and inches/day for three grass production systems: high quality overseeded turf, acceptable quality overseeded turf and acceptable quality turf with no overseeding. The bulletin concludes with a discussion on how to use incorporate this into turf irrigation management programs.
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use: Payson, Arizona

      Brown, Paul; Jones, Chris; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-11)
      This publication is meant to be a short fact sheet that provides estimates of turfgrass consumptive use (of water) in the Payson area. The publication provides a brief description of the procedures used to generate the CU estimates, then presents the data both as a CU table and CU curve. The publication should prove useful for irrigation management and water resource planning.
    • Turfgrass Consumptive Use: Prescott, Arizona

      Brown, Paul; Schalau, Jeff; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-11)
      This publication is intended as a brief Fact Sheet that provides estimates of turfgrass consumptive use for Prescott.
    • Using Gypsum in Southwestern Soils

      Walworth, James; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-07)
      Gypsum can help stabilize aggregate structure in some soils.