• Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert; Kilby, Michael; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication discusses some backyard fruits that can be grown at elevations between 3500 to 6000 feet and also lists varieties of each fruit by harvest season.
    • Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert E; Kilby, Michael; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      The mid elevations (3,500 to 6,000 feet) in Arizona can be ideal for growing tree fruit. Site selection can make a pronounced effect on how well fruit will grow and produce. The warmer the site the greater the chance of success. Areas where cold air settles are a poor choice for tree fruit production. Variety selection is very important for good fruit production.February and March are the best months to plant bare root trees, although they can be planted anytime during the dormant season. Try to plant 30 days before bud break. Containerized plants are best planted in late September through early October. The open center pruning system allows for more sunlight to reach all the branches of the tree. Whereas the central leader is used with those trees that are less vigorous. Training trees when young is an important step in ensuring a strong scaffold system when bearing. Fruit thinning helps to control fruit size and consistent bearing. Proper fertilization, irrigation, and pest control will promote healthy productive trees.
    • Damping Off

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Damping off is caused by several different fungi under different environmental conditions. The fungi include Pythium, Rhizoctonia solani, and Thielaviopsis basicola. This article discusses the symptoms, environmental conditions, diseases, prevention and control methods for the damping-off caused by fungi.
    • Fire Blight

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Fireblight is a bacterial disease that affects only plants in the rose family, particularly apple, pear and pyracantha. This article briefly discusses the symptoms and environmental conditions for this disease and the way to control it.
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Pine bark beetles in Arizona are generally of the genus Ips or Dendroctonus. Fading foliage in the tree is often the first sign of a beetle attack. Prevention is best practiced since control is not possible once the beetles have successfully colonized the tree. Colonization is dependent upon trees being in a vulnerable condition caused by stress from various agents and site conditions.
    • Pinyon Needle Scale

      Schalau, Jeff; Young, Deborah; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-06)
      Pinyon needle scale (Matsucoccus acalyptus) are very small (0.5 mm) sucking insects that feed on pinyon, singleleaf pinyon, and foxtail pines in the southwestern United States. These insects can be effectively controlled using an integrated approach which includes sanitation, supplemental irrigation, and pesticides.
    • Sooty Canker

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Sooty canker causes cankers and dieback in tree branches. This article briefly explains the host, symptoms, environmental conditions, disease and preventing / controlling method for sooty canker.
    • Verticillium Wilt

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Verticillium Wilt causes wilting and yellowing of leaves, death of limbs, often on one side or a portion of the plant. This article provides information on the disease caused by Verticillium Wilt including the host, symptoms, environmental conditions, disease and the preventing / controlling method.