• The American Hornet Moth in the Urban Forests of Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      Information about life cycle and damage in aspens, poplars and willows found especially in Arizona and their control methods.
    • Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-01)
      This article provides information about how to use annual flowers in Northern Arizona. It describes how to plan a garden, plant flowers and prepare soil. It lists out many of the common annual flowers that perfrom well in higher elevations in Arizona.
    • Arizona Landscape Palms

      Davison, Elizabeth; Begeman, John; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-12)
      The luxuriant tropical appearance and stately silhouette of palms add much to the Arizona landscape. Few other plants are as striking in low and mid elevation gardens. Although winter frosts and low humidity limit the choices somewhat, a good number of palms are available, ranging from the dwarf Mediterranean fan palm to the massive Canary Island date palm. This publication addresses the landscape use and the adaption of palms, as well as how to plant and take care of them. Topics include: . Landscape Use . Adaptation . Planting Palms . Care of Established Palms . Diseases and Insect Pests . Palms for Arizona . Feather Palms . Fan Palms . Palm-like Plants
    • Arizona Plant Climate Zones

      Davison, Elizabeth; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-03)
    • Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert; Kilby, Michael; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication discusses some backyard fruits that can be grown at elevations between 3500 to 6000 feet and also lists varieties of each fruit by harvest season.
    • Bagrada Bug: A New Pest for Arizona Gardeners

      Bealmear, Stacey; Warren, Peter; Young, Kelly (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-12)
    • Budding Citrus Trees

      Wright, Glenn C.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      Citrus budding is a plant propagation technique that any homeowner can do. Once the technique is learned, homeowners can add citrus tree. This publication addresses the budding techniques of citrus trees. Topics include the preparation prior to budding, selecting budsticks, storing budsticks, selecting and preparing the budding location, cutting the bud, inserting the bud in the t cut, and forcing the bud.
    • Cactus, Agave, Yucca and Ocotillo

      Kelly, Jack; Grumbles, Rob; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-04)
    • Camelthorn: A Homeowners Guide

      Norton, Eric; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-01)
      Camelthorn is an invasive weed classified as a noxious weed in Arizona. The weed has the potential to cause serious damage for private landowners and their property. This fact sheet provides the means for landowners to identify and take steps to control and eliminate this weed.
    • Care of Desert-Adapted Plants

      Waterfall, Patricia; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998)
      Arid urban environment increases the potential insect problems in shrubs and trees. Urban stress conditions include extreme temperatures, salty irrigation water, and heavy soils. Further, many trees and shrubs available in nurseries are not adapted to these arid climates. This publication discusses in detail how to prevent or reduce insect and disease problems for desert-adapted plants by following proper planting, pruning, irrigation, and weed control practices.
    • Common Insect Contaminants Found in Arizona Lettuce

      Kerns, David L.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication describes the common insects found in Arizona lettuce through the use of pictures. The insects include; lepidopterous larva, striped flea beetle, leafminer fly, leafminer mine, adult western flower thrips, winged adult aphid, false chinch bug, lygus bug, potato leafhopper, and threecornered alfalfa hopper.
    • Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape

      DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-09)
      Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
    • The Conenose Bug (AKA "The Kissing Bug")

      Cordell, Susan; Baxter, TP; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1999-05)
      One would not suspect that an insect with the congenial nickname of kissing bug could cause life-threatening allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) in sensitive individuals. But anaphylactic shock can be the result of the bite of Triatoma species, also known as the conenose bug, kissing bug, assassin bug, Mexican bedbug, and the Wallapai tiger. This publication discusses the identification, habitat, and the conenose bite of this insect, as well as the controlling method used to reduce theie numbers.
    • Converting Turf to a Xeriscape Landscape: How To Eliminate a Bermudagrass Lawn Using Glyphosate

      Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-09)
      The most difficult part of conversion from a lawn to a low water (xeriscape) landscape is the removal of a lawn. By removing a Bermuda grass lawn, it is estimated that water savings of 50 -75% is possible. Potential water savings comes from the fact that water is applied to a limited amount of total yard space, compared to the greater water needs of a continuous grass-covered area. Also, by planting low water use plants, less maintenance is required and substantial cost savings can be realized. Turf removal and subsequent weed suppression is achievable using readily available herbicides.
    • Cooley Spruce Gall Adelgid in Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      This publication provides information and describes Cooley spruce galls in Northern Arizona. Douglas-fir and spruce are alternate hosts for these galls. The life cycle of galls and their management/control methods are described in detail here.
    • Cotton (Texas) Root Rot

      Olsen, Mary W.; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Cotton root rot commonly causes a sudden wilt and death of susceptible plants in summer months but may also cause a slow decline, especially at cooler temperatures. So, positive identification of disease by an experienced person is essential. This publication addresses the symptoms, environmental conditions, disease, prevention and control methods, sampling, identifying susceptible plants and the tolerant and immune plants of cotton root rot.
    • Cricket Management

      Bradley, Lucy; Gibson, Roberta; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998-04)
      Indian house crickets and field crickets are the two most common crickets in Arizona. Although these crickets do not bite or carry diseases, they are considered a nuisance because of their "chirping". This publication focuses on common crickets found in Arizona, including the Indian house crickets, field crickets, and Jerusalem crickets. It also discusses the problems they cause and the strategies to control them.
    • Cut Stump Application of Herbicides to Manage Woody Vegetation

      Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Cut Stump Application of Herbicides to Manage Woody Vegetation

      Schalau, Jeff; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-04)
      Persistent woody plants can sometimes conflict with gardening and landscape goals. In many cases, plant removal becomes necessary. This may be accomplished through manual stump removal or the use of herbicides. With some knowledge of the life history of the target plant, cut stumps can be safely and effectively treated with herbicides to prevent regrowth. Species lists, safety tips, examples, photos, and non-herbicide alternatives are provided to ensure optimum stump killing success.