• The American Hornet Moth in the Urban Forests of Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-03)
      Information about life cycle and damage in aspens, poplars and willows found especially in Arizona and their control methods.
    • Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-01)
      This article provides information about how to use annual flowers in Northern Arizona. It describes how to plan a garden, plant flowers and prepare soil. It lists out many of the common annual flowers that perfrom well in higher elevations in Arizona.
    • Aphids

      Warren, Peter L.; Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      A description of aphids, the damage they cause, their lifecycle, and management recommendations.
    • Arizona Home Gardening

      Tate, Harvey F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1953-09)
    • Arizona Home Gardening

      Tate, Harvey F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1946-05)
    • Arizona Landscape Palms

      Davison, Elizabeth; Begeman, John; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-12)
      The luxuriant tropical appearance and stately silhouette of palms add much to the Arizona landscape. Few other plants are as striking in low and mid elevation gardens. Although winter frosts and low humidity limit the choices somewhat, a good number of palms are available, ranging from the dwarf Mediterranean fan palm to the massive Canary Island date palm. This publication addresses the landscape use and the adaption of palms, as well as how to plant and take care of them. Topics include: . Landscape Use . Adaptation . Planting Palms . Care of Established Palms . Diseases and Insect Pests . Palms for Arizona . Feather Palms . Fan Palms . Palm-like Plants
    • Arizona Plant Climate Zones

      Davison, Elizabeth; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-03)
    • Arizona Ranch, Farm, and Garden Weeds

      Parker, Kittie F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1958-06)
    • Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert E; Kilby, Michael; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      The mid elevations (3,500 to 6,000 feet) in Arizona can be ideal for growing tree fruit. Site selection can make a pronounced effect on how well fruit will grow and produce. The warmer the site the greater the chance of success. Areas where cold air settles are a poor choice for tree fruit production. Variety selection is very important for good fruit production.February and March are the best months to plant bare root trees, although they can be planted anytime during the dormant season. Try to plant 30 days before bud break. Containerized plants are best planted in late September through early October. The open center pruning system allows for more sunlight to reach all the branches of the tree. Whereas the central leader is used with those trees that are less vigorous. Training trees when young is an important step in ensuring a strong scaffold system when bearing. Fruit thinning helps to control fruit size and consistent bearing. Proper fertilization, irrigation, and pest control will promote healthy productive trees.
    • Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert; Kilby, Michael; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication discusses some backyard fruits that can be grown at elevations between 3500 to 6000 feet and also lists varieties of each fruit by harvest season.
    • Bagrada Bug: A New Pest for Arizona Gardeners

      Bealmear, Stacey; Warren, Peter; Young, Kelly (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-12)
    • Better Coverage of Arizona's Weather and Climate: Gridded Datasets of Daily Surface Meteorological Variables

      Weiss, Jeremy; Crimmins, Michael; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-08)
      Many areas that use agricultural and environmental science for management and planning – ecosystem conservation, crop and livestock systems, water resources, forestry and wildland fire management, urban horticulture – often need historical records of daily weather for activities that range from modeling forage production to determining the frequency of freezing temperatures or heavy rainfall. In the past, such applications primarily have used station-based observations of meteorological variables like temperature and precipitation. However, weather stations are sparsely and irregularly located throughout Arizona, and due to the highly variable terrain across the state (Figure 1), information recorded at these sites may not represent meteorological conditions at distant, non-instrumented locations or over broad areas. This issue, along with others related to quality, length, and completeness of station records, can hinder the use of weather and climate data for agricultural and natural resources applications. In response to an increasing demand for spatially and temporally complete meteorological data as well as the potential constraints of station-based records, the number of gridded daily surface weather datasets is expanding. This bulletin reviews a current suite of these datasets, particularly those that integrate both atmospheric and topographic information in order to better model temperature and precipitation on relatively fine spatial scales, and is intended for readers with knowledge of weather, climate, and geospatial data. In addition to addressing how these datasets are developed and what their spatial domain and resolution, record length, and variables are, this bulletin also summarizes where and how to access these datasets, as well as the general suitability of these datasets for different uses.
    • Birds of Paradise Shrubberies for the Low Desert

      Warren, Peter L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-06)
      A description of the popular bird of paradise shrubberies available for use in the desert southwest.
    • Budding Citrus Trees

      Wright, Glenn C.; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      Citrus budding is a plant propagation technique that any homeowner can do. Once the technique is learned, homeowners can add citrus tree. This publication addresses the budding techniques of citrus trees. Topics include the preparation prior to budding, selecting budsticks, storing budsticks, selecting and preparing the budding location, cutting the bud, inserting the bud in the t cut, and forcing the bud.
    • Bulbs for Northern Arizona

      Allen, Alvin.; Tate, Harvey F. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1958-06)
    • Cactus, Agave, Yucca and Ocotillo

      Kelly, Jack; Grumbles, Rob; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-04)
    • Camelthorn: A Homeowners Guide

      Norton, Eric; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-01)
      Camelthorn is an invasive weed classified as a noxious weed in Arizona. The weed has the potential to cause serious damage for private landowners and their property. This fact sheet provides the means for landowners to identify and take steps to control and eliminate this weed.
    • Care of Desert-Adapted Plants

      Waterfall, Patricia; Soil, Water & Enviromental Science (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1998)
      Arid urban environment increases the potential insect problems in shrubs and trees. Urban stress conditions include extreme temperatures, salty irrigation water, and heavy soils. Further, many trees and shrubs available in nurseries are not adapted to these arid climates. This publication discusses in detail how to prevent or reduce insect and disease problems for desert-adapted plants by following proper planting, pruning, irrigation, and weed control practices.
    • Common Insect Contaminants Found in Arizona Lettuce

      Kerns, David L.; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-02)
      This publication describes the common insects found in Arizona lettuce through the use of pictures. The insects include; lepidopterous larva, striped flea beetle, leafminer fly, leafminer mine, adult western flower thrips, winged adult aphid, false chinch bug, lygus bug, potato leafhopper, and threecornered alfalfa hopper.