• Pruning Hedges to Provide Screening

      Fazio, Steve; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      An ideal hedge for screening patio areas should have dense foliage from the base to the very top of the plants. In order to develop a hedge with these qualities, the gardener should prune the plants in such a manner as to encourage the plants to develop branches and leaves at the lower portion at the time of planting and until the desired height is reached. The procedures for pruning shrubs are simple, but in many instances the basic principles are overlooked or not put into practice simply because the gardener does not want to sacrifice the growth of the plants before they reach the desired height.
    • Pruning Deciduous Shade Trees

      Davison, Elisabeth; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      The pruning principles discussed in this publication have proven to provide the best possible out comes including tree longevity and safety. Although trees may live for years following improper pruning their life span and safety may be severely reduced. We encourage proper pruning so that the trees we care for may bring us pleasure for many years.
    • Pruning Evergreen Shrubs

      Fazio, Steve; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Evergreen shrubs used to landscape the home grounds should be permitted to grow and develop into their natural shapes. Natural growing shrubs lend a pleasing look to the home grounds. This does not mean that we cannot prune to keep them within limited bounds, but we should definitely not prune to formal shapes such as globes, squares or pyramids. If they are pruned in this manner, they must be constantly sheared to maintain these shapes.
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Pine bark beetles in Arizona are generally of the genus Ips or Dendroctonus. Fading foliage in the tree is often the first sign of a beetle attack. Prevention is best practiced since control is not possible once the beetles have successfully colonized the tree. Colonization is dependent upon trees being in a vulnerable condition caused by stress from various agents and site conditions.
    • Backyard Fruit Production at Elevations 3500 to 6000 Feet

      Young, Deborah; Call, Robert E; Kilby, Michael; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-03)
      The mid elevations (3,500 to 6,000 feet) in Arizona can be ideal for growing tree fruit. Site selection can make a pronounced effect on how well fruit will grow and produce. The warmer the site the greater the chance of success. Areas where cold air settles are a poor choice for tree fruit production. Variety selection is very important for good fruit production.February and March are the best months to plant bare root trees, although they can be planted anytime during the dormant season. Try to plant 30 days before bud break. Containerized plants are best planted in late September through early October. The open center pruning system allows for more sunlight to reach all the branches of the tree. Whereas the central leader is used with those trees that are less vigorous. Training trees when young is an important step in ensuring a strong scaffold system when bearing. Fruit thinning helps to control fruit size and consistent bearing. Proper fertilization, irrigation, and pest control will promote healthy productive trees.
    • Cotton (Texas) Root Rot

      Olsen, Mary (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      The most important disease of woody dicotyledonous plants in Arizona is Phymatotrichopsis root rot (Cotton or Texas root rot) caused by a unique and widely distributed soil-borne fungus, Phymatotrichopsis omnivora. The fungus is indigenous to the alkaline, low-organic matter soils of the southwestern United States and central and northern Mexico.
    • Ten Steps to a Successful Vegetable Garden

      DeGomez, Tom; Oebker, Norman F.; Call, Robert E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-02)
      Ten carefully taken steps will produce many enjoyable moments and an abundant harvest of fresh vegetables during much of the year. The ten steps are: 1) Select a good location. 2) Plan your garden layout. 3) Grow recommended varieties. 4) Obtain good seed, plants, equipment and supplies. 5) Prepare and care for the soil properly. 6) Plant your vegetables properly. 7) Irrigate with care. 8) Mulch & cultivate to control weeds. 9) Be prepared for pests and problems. 10) Harvest at peak quality.
    • Susceptibility of Mesquite Species to Powdery Mildew in Arizona

      Nischwitz, Claudia; Olsen, Mary W.; Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah; University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-12)
      Mesquite (Prosopis sp.) is a popular tree in landscapes in Arizona because of its drought tolerance and attractive growth habit. Powdery mildew has been observed from late summer until early spring on mesquite leaves. It has been identified as Pleochaeta polychaeta based on morphological descriptions and comparison to herbarium specimens. Surveys were conducted in fall 2008 through winter 2009 at two locations in southern Arizona to determine the susceptibility of different mesquite species to powdery mildew. Twelve mesquite trees representing two species were sampled at Texas Canyon near Willcox, AZ, and 177 trees representing eight species were sampled at the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, AZ. The North American mesquite species P. glandulosa var. glandulosa and P. velutina were infected with powdery mildew at the University of Arizona campus and P. velutina at the Texas Canyon site. No powdery mildew was observed on P. alba, P. cinerea, P. nigra, P. chilensis, P. pubescens and P. chilensis x flexuosa. The powdery mildew affects the aesthetic value of severely infected trees but seems to have little effect on long term tree health.
    • Working with Non-Profit Organizations – Cooperative Extension’s Opportunity to Expand Its Reach

      Apel, Mark B.; Warren, Peter L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-12)
      This article describes the advantages and benefits of collaborations between Cooperative Extension and non-profit organizations in terms of increasing Extension's outreach capacity and assisting non-profits. Guidelines are provided for Extension personnel interested in working with non-profits.
    • Sonic Pest Repellents

      Aflitto, Nicholas; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-10)
      Commercially available sonic pest devices for use in residential applications have not been shown to be effective in scientific studies. For this reason, use of these devices is not advised to treat common pest problems. Although some researchers are developing sonic techniques that illustrate promise for very specific pests, these technologies are yet to be commercially available. As our understanding increases of how pest species receive and process sound, more relevant sonic devices may be developed. The allure of sound as a treatment for pests will remain into the future—motivated by the fact that if they are successful they will be more environmentally friendly and safer for humans.
    • Aphids

      Warren, Peter L.; Schalau, Jeff (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      A description of aphids, the damage they cause, their lifecycle, and management recommendations.
    • Growing Figs in the Low Desert

      Bealmear-Jones, Stacey R. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-07)
      This publication will help home gardeners grow figs. It includes cultural care as well as pest management.
    • Phenology: Using Phenology as a Tool for Education, Research, and Understanding Environmental Change

      Warren, Peter L.; Barnett, LoriAnne (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-06)
      Phenology is defined and described in terms of how we use observations in education and research. Suggestions for implementing phenology lessons using examples from 4-H youth development and Master Gardener and citizen science training.
    • Birds of Paradise Shrubberies for the Low Desert

      Warren, Peter L. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2014-06)
      A description of the popular bird of paradise shrubberies available for use in the desert southwest.
    • Landscape Vines for Southern Arizona

      Warren, Peter L.; Pima County Cooperative Extension (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-10)
    • Pines of Arizona

      Jones, Christoper; Kelly, Jack (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-06)
    • Annual Flowers for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Ground Covers for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Shrubs for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Recognizing and Treating Iron Deficiency in the Home Yard

      Walworth, James (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-01)