• Easements

      Dolan, Cori; Apel, Mark; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      Easements are the right to use the land of another for a special purpose. Unlike a lease, an easement does not give the holder a right of “possession” of the property, only a right of use. This fact sheet describes the different types of easements for private property. Revised 9/2016; Originally Published 1/2010.
    • Easements

      Apel, Mark; Dolan, Cori; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-01)
      The Tips for Arizona's Rural Landowners Fact Sheet Series is intended to educate homeowners who have recently purchased small acreages in Arizona. The purpose of the series is to give homeowners information about living in rural settings. The Land Use Planning Unit includes fact sheets on open range concepts, easements, zoning and permitting, and home-siting.
    • Home-siting for New Rural Residents

      Apel, Mark; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      Choosing the right spot to build a home in Arizona on a vacant piece of property is just as important as choosing the property itself. This fact sheet describes the factors that should be considered before beginning construction on any given piece of property. Revised 9/2016; Originally published 1/2011
    • Home-siting for New Rural Residents

      Apel, Mark; Dolan, Cori; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-01)
      The Tips for Arizona's Rural Landowners Fact Sheet Series is intended to educate homeowners who have recently purchased small acreages in Arizona. The purpose of the series is to give homeowners information about living in rural settings. The Land Use Planning Unit includes fact sheets on open range concepts, easements, zoning and permitting, and homesiting.
    • How to Be Engaged with Your Local Government on Sustainable Development

      Apel, Mark (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      While individuals may make conscious, life-style choices that promote sustainability, such as eating locally-grown food or driving a hybrid vehicle, the responsibility of “the greatest good for the greatest number” often rests squarely in the hands of local government. Often local government needs to be involved when dealing with issues that affect the community as a whole. At the same time, engaging with one’s local government may seem daunting and many people believe that there are invisible walls between the citizens of a community and their elected or public officials. However, our state and federal constitutions require transparency and access to government. This fact sheet describes the opportunities for citizens to participate directly with their local government. Revised 9/2016; Originally published 11/2010
    • Know Your Zoning

      Apel, Mark; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      Zoning is the mechanism by which government protects public health, safety and welfare in addition to minimizing impacts to neighboring properties. This fact sheet informs the reader on where to go to find out about the zoning of their rural property in Arizona and what limitations and opportunities their zoning calls for. Revised 9/2016; Originally published 1/2011
    • Know Your Zoning

      Apel, Mark; Dolan, Cori; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-01)
      The Tips for Arizona's Rural Landowners Fact Sheet Series is intended to educate homeowners who have recently purchased small acreages in Arizona. The purpose of the series is to give homeowners information about living in rural settings. The Land Use Planning Unit includes fact sheets on open range concepts, easements, zoning and permitting, and homesiting.
    • Using Scenario Planning to Prepare for Uncertainty in Rural Watersheds

      Mott Lacroix, Kelly; Hullinger, Ashley; Apel, Mark; Brandau, William; Megdal, Sharon B. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-12)
      Planning for an uncertain future presents many challenges. Thinking systematically and creatively about what is in store through a process called scenario planning can help illuminate options for action and improve decision-making. This guide focuses on a process for developing scenarios to help communities and watershed groups explore what might happen in the years to come, make more informed decisions today, and build a watershed management process. The systematic approach to scenario planning described here is based on the lessons learned through a yearlong scenario planning process in the Upper Gila Watershed in southeastern Arizona and Water Resource Research Center’s (WRRC) research on scenario planning.
    • What You Need to Know Before You Buy Your "Ranchette" - Lot-Splits Versus Subdivisions in Rural Arizona

      Apel, Mark; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-02)
      The Tips for Arizona's Rural Landowners Fact Sheet Series is intended to educate homeowners who have recently purchased small acreages in Arizona. The purpose of the series is to give homeowners information about living in rural settings. The Land Use Planning Unit includes fact sheets on open range concepts, easements, zoning and permitting, and homesiting.
    • What You Need to Know Before You Buy Your “Ranchette”— Lot-Splits Versus Subdivisions in Rural Arizona

      Apel, Mark; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      Arizona's rural areas are dotted with small acreage properties that are too big to mow and too small to farm. This fact sheet describes the legal processes that create these kinds of properties and inform the reader on the difference between lot-split properties and those that undergo a legal subdivision process with a local county government. Revised 9/2016; Originally published 2/2011.