• Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape

      DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-09)
      Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
    • Creating Wildfire-Defensible Spaces for Your Home and Property

      DeGomez, Tom; Jones, Chris (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • Fire Safety for Wildland Homes

      DeGomez, Tom; Jones, Chris (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • Fire-Resistant Landscaping

      DeGomez, Tom; Jones, Chris (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • FIREWISE Plant Materials for 3,000 ft. and Higher Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Schalau, Jeff; Jones, Chris; Campbell, Steve (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • FIREWISE Plant Materials for 3,000 ft. and Higher Elevations

      Deneke, Fred; DeGomez, Tom; Schalau, Jeff; Jones, Chris; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
    • Ground Covers for Northern Arizona Above 6,000 Foot Elevations

      Braun, Hattie; DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-03)
    • Ground Covers for Northern Arizona above 6000 Foot Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
      Ground covers can be any low-growing, creeping, sprawling plant whose primary purpose is to cover the ground in managed landscapes. General planting instructions, their care, selection and cultural requirements used in ground cover and explained in this article in detail.
    • Guidelines for Thinning Ponderosa Pine for Improved Forest Health and Fire Prevention

      DeGomez, Tom; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-03)
      Preventing catastrophic stand replacing events are best accomplished through thinning. Lower tree densities result in greater tree growth. Stands with lower tree densities have greater plant diversity. Determining stand conditions will provide a baseline for formulating a plan to improve stand conditions. Thinning around individual trees can improve individual tree health reducing the likelihood of damage from bark beetles, fire or drought.
    • Homeowners' "Inside and Out" Wildfire Checklist

      DeGomez, Tom; Jones, Chris (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-08)
    • Insects, Diseases and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlands

      DeGomez, Tom; Garfin, Gregg (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-11)
      Recent events in the forests of the Southwest, and across western North America, have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Studies focusing on Arizona and other southwestern states point to multiple, interacting climate-related mechanisms that increase the propensity for forest mortality. Effects of insects on forests are complex, and species and site dependent. Many influences, such as drought, decreased precipitation, increased temperature, increased vapor pressure deficit, and increased stand density, combined in nonlinear and overlapping ways to create the recent and devastating pine bark beetle outbreaks in Arizona forests. Climate clearly plays a role in many, but not all, Southwest insect cycles. It is important that educators demonstrate the complexity of all of the interplaying issues, in order to communicate no false impressions of an “easy” or “one-size- fits-all” solution” for land managers.
    • Insects, Diseases, and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      DeGomez, Tom; Garfin, Gregg; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-08)
      Recent events in the forests of the Southwest have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Over 70 million pine trees along with millions of other conifers died in 2002-03. Average temperature increases of 3°C enabled the MPB at those high elevations to achieve univoltine (having one generation per year) reproduction leading to previously unheard of outbreaks in white bark pine at high elevation sites in Idaho.Aspen defoliation in Arizona and New Mexico averaged ~ 20,375 acres from 1990 to 1997. A series of events has contributed to the decline of aspen since 1997.
    • Invasive Plants in Arizona's Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      DeGomez, Tom; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-07)
      Climate change appears to have an effect on invasive species in the forests and woodlands of Arizona. Many invasive plants have been documented. Land managers and educators will find this publication informative.
    • Management of Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      DeGomez, Tom; Lenart, Melanie; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-11)
      Climate change may have dramatic effects on Arizona's forests and woodlands. Wildfires and insects may become of greater concern. Plant species will likely shift in elevation to adapt to the warming conditions.
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      This paper provides evidence of the infestation caused by pine bark beetles in Arizona. It provides information about their life history, and how to prevent and control them.
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Pine bark beetles in Arizona are generally of the genus Ips or Dendroctonus. Fading foliage in the tree is often the first sign of a beetle attack. Prevention is best practiced since control is not possible once the beetles have successfully colonized the tree. Colonization is dependent upon trees being in a vulnerable condition caused by stress from various agents and site conditions.
    • Recovering from Wildfire: A Guide for Arizona's Forest Owners

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Soil Erosion Control after Wildfire

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Wildfire HAZard Severity Rating Checklist for Arizona Homes and Communities

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-09)