• Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Arizona Weather & Climate

      Emanuel, Robert; Garfin, Gregg; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. This guide was designed to compliment the mission of the Arizona Master Watershed Steward Program to educate and train citizens across the state to serve as volunteers in the monitoring, restoration, conservation, and protection of their water and watersheds. This guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach one or more important aspects of watershed science or management to a public adult audience.
    • Climate Change and Wildfire Impacts in Southwest Forests and Woodlands

      Rogstad, Alix; Crimmins, Michael; Garfin, Gregg (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-04)
    • Climate Change and Wildfire Impacts in Southwest Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      Crimmins, Michael; Garfin, Gregg; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-11)
      Southwest forests are complex systems that are influenced by climate variability. Wildfires naturally occur in these forests and woodlands, but with an increasing population, land management decisions are becoming more difficult. This publication is a result of discussions from the "Workshop on Climate Variability and Ecosystem Impacts" that was sponsored by UA Cooperative Extension in February 2005. It provides a summary of the current situation, a summary of climate change science for land management, and a brief description of suggested future research in climate science as it relates to forests and woodlands.
    • Insects, Diseases and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlands

      DeGomez, Tom; Garfin, Gregg (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-11)
      Recent events in the forests of the Southwest, and across western North America, have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Studies focusing on Arizona and other southwestern states point to multiple, interacting climate-related mechanisms that increase the propensity for forest mortality. Effects of insects on forests are complex, and species and site dependent. Many influences, such as drought, decreased precipitation, increased temperature, increased vapor pressure deficit, and increased stand density, combined in nonlinear and overlapping ways to create the recent and devastating pine bark beetle outbreaks in Arizona forests. Climate clearly plays a role in many, but not all, Southwest insect cycles. It is important that educators demonstrate the complexity of all of the interplaying issues, in order to communicate no false impressions of an “easy” or “one-size- fits-all” solution” for land managers.
    • Insects, Diseases, and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      DeGomez, Tom; Garfin, Gregg; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-08)
      Recent events in the forests of the Southwest have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Over 70 million pine trees along with millions of other conifers died in 2002-03. Average temperature increases of 3°C enabled the MPB at those high elevations to achieve univoltine (having one generation per year) reproduction leading to previously unheard of outbreaks in white bark pine at high elevation sites in Idaho.Aspen defoliation in Arizona and New Mexico averaged ~ 20,375 acres from 1990 to 1997. A series of events has contributed to the decline of aspen since 1997.