• Comandra Blister Rust

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Mondell pine should not be planted within a mile of Comandra populations. Infection of pine occurs through needles by spores produced on Comandra, but spores produced on pine cannot re-infect pine. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for blister rust.
    • Cooperative Extension Rangeland Monitoring Program

      Ruyle, George B.; Young, Deborah; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2004)
    • Dwarf Mistletoes

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      Dwarf mistletoes are parasitic flowering plants that grow within host plants for about two years before producing characteristic yellow to orange or green to brown leafless aerial shoots on the outside of infected host tissue. They occur only on conifers in the pine family in Arizona and are usually host specific. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for dwarf mistletoes.
    • Establishing Irrigated Pasture at 4,000 to 6,000 Ft. Elevations in Arizona

      Young, Deborah; Frost, Bill; Schneider, Mike (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1994-09)
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      This paper provides evidence of the infestation caused by pine bark beetles in Arizona. It provides information about their life history, and how to prevent and control them.
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-04)
      Pine bark beetles in Arizona are generally of the genus Ips or Dendroctonus. Fading foliage in the tree is often the first sign of a beetle attack. Prevention is best practiced since control is not possible once the beetles have successfully colonized the tree. Colonization is dependent upon trees being in a vulnerable condition caused by stress from various agents and site conditions.
    • Pinyon Needle Scale

      Schalau, Jeff; Young, Deborah; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2003-06)
      Pinyon needle scale (Matsucoccus acalyptus) are very small (0.5 mm) sucking insects that feed on pinyon, singleleaf pinyon, and foxtail pines in the southwestern United States. These insects can be effectively controlled using an integrated approach which includes sanitation, supplemental irrigation, and pesticides.
    • True Mistletoes

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      True mistletoes are parasitic flowering plants with characteristic clumps of growth that are easily visible on the host plant. They reduce the growth of infected hosts, but it usually takes many years for true mistletoe infections to kill a mature tree or shrub. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for true mistletoes.