• Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Geologic Processes

      Pater, Susan; McReynolds, Kim; Uhlman, Kristine; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the restoration, conservation, monitoring, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about important aspects of watershed science and management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Life in the Watershed -- Part I: Watershed Ecology

      Emanuel, Robert; Radden, Russ; Clark, Richard J.; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the monitoring, restoration, conservation, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about one or more important aspects of watershed science or management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Regional and State Water Management

      Emanuel, Robert; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the monitoring, restoration, conservation, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about one or more important aspects of watershed science or management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Water Quality & Monitoring

      Farrell-Poe, Kitt; Payne, Will; Emanuel, Robert; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the restoration, conservation, monitoring, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about important aspects of watershed science and management.
    • Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide: Watershed Basic -- Part I: Water Resources

      McReynolds, Kim; Pater, Susan; Uhlman, Kristine; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005)
      Arizona Watershed Stewardship Guide was created to help individuals and groups build a mutual foundation of basic knowledge about watersheds in Arizona. It is intended to help Arizonans understand and be good stewards of their watersheds. The guide was designed to compliment the mission of Arizona Master Watershed Steward program to educate and train citizens across the state of Arizona to serve as volunteers in the restoration, conservation, monitoring, and protection of their water and watersheds. The guide consists of 10 self-contained modules which teach about important aspects of watershed science and management.
    • Camelthorn: A Homeowners Guide

      Norton, Eric; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2005-01)
      Camelthorn is an invasive weed classified as a noxious weed in Arizona. The weed has the potential to cause serious damage for private landowners and their property. This fact sheet provides the means for landowners to identify and take steps to control and eliminate this weed.
    • Climate Change and Wildfire Impacts in Southwest Forests and Woodlands

      Rogstad, Alix; Crimmins, Michael; Garfin, Gregg (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-04)
    • Climate Change and Wildfire Impacts in Southwest Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      Crimmins, Michael; Garfin, Gregg; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-11)
      Southwest forests are complex systems that are influenced by climate variability. Wildfires naturally occur in these forests and woodlands, but with an increasing population, land management decisions are becoming more difficult. This publication is a result of discussions from the "Workshop on Climate Variability and Ecosystem Impacts" that was sponsored by UA Cooperative Extension in February 2005. It provides a summary of the current situation, a summary of climate change science for land management, and a brief description of suggested future research in climate science as it relates to forests and woodlands.
    • Invasive Plants in Arizona's Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      DeGomez, Tom; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-07)
      Climate change appears to have an effect on invasive species in the forests and woodlands of Arizona. Many invasive plants have been documented. Land managers and educators will find this publication informative.
    • Non-Native Invasive Plants of Arizona

      Howery, Larry D.; Northam, Ed; Meyer, Walt; Arnold, Jennifer; Carrillo, Emilio; Egen, Kristen; Hershdorfer, Mary (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-12)
      The noxious weed problem in the western United States has been described as, a biological forest fire racing beyond control because no one wants to be fire boss. Indeed, when small weed infestations are left unchecked, they can grow exponentially and spread across the land much like a slow-moving biological wildfire. However, land consumed by fire usually recovers and is often more productive than before the fire occurred. On the other hand, land consumed by noxious weeds may be irreversibly changed and never again reach its full biological potential. Reviewed 12/2016, First Edition Published 2001
    • Non-Native Invasive Plants of Arizona

      Howery, Larry D.; Northam, Ed; Meyer, Walt; Arnold, Jennifer; Carrillo, Emilio; Egen, Kristen; Hershdorfer, Mary; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009)
      The noxious weed problem in the western United States has been described as, a biological forest fire racing beyond control because no one wants to be fire boss. Indeed, when small weed infestations are left unchecked, they can grow exponentially and spread across the land much like a slow-moving biological wildfire. However, land consumed by fire usually recovers and is often more productive than before the fire occurred. On the other hand, land consumed by noxious weeds may be irreversibly changed and never again reach its full biological potential.