• Climate Change and Wildfire Impacts in Southwest Forests and Woodlands

      Rogstad, Alix; Crimmins, Michael; Garfin, Gregg (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2012-04)
    • Climate Change and Wildfire Impacts in Southwest Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      Crimmins, Michael; Garfin, Gregg; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-11)
      Southwest forests are complex systems that are influenced by climate variability. Wildfires naturally occur in these forests and woodlands, but with an increasing population, land management decisions are becoming more difficult. This publication is a result of discussions from the "Workshop on Climate Variability and Ecosystem Impacts" that was sponsored by UA Cooperative Extension in February 2005. It provides a summary of the current situation, a summary of climate change science for land management, and a brief description of suggested future research in climate science as it relates to forests and woodlands.
    • Comparing the Ignitability of Mulch Materials for a Firewise Landscape

      DeGomez, Tom; Rogstad, Alix; Schalau, Jeff; Kelly, Jack; Plant Sciences, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-09)
      Eight different landscape mulches were tested for their flammability using a propane torch, charcoal briquette, and a cigarette at two different times of the year. Three randomized compete blocks with eight one square meter plots were tested at three locations; Tucson, Prescott, and Flagstaff, Arizona. Each of the mulches was subjected to the heat of a handheld propane torch (15 seconds), a glowing charcoal briquette (five minutes), and a lit cigarette (until burned out). We found that the least dense mulches (pine needles and straw) burned rapidly when subjected to the torch and ignited after the briquette was removed. The medium density mulches (pine bark nuggets and wood chips) had low flame lengths and smoldered. Heavy density mulches (garden compost and shredded bark) only smoldered. The decomposed granite and sod did not ignite or smolder.
    • Creating Wildfire-Defensible Spaces for Your Home and Property

      Deneke, Fred; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
    • Creating Wildfire-Defensible Spaces for Your Home and Property

      DeGomez, Tom; Jones, Chris (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • Fire Safety for Wildland Homes

      DeGomez, Tom; Jones, Chris (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • Fire Safety for Wildland Homes

      Deneke, Fred; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
      This article gives information about fire protection in rural areas and explains how a homeowner can protect his home. It provides tips for evacuating one's home and defending it.
    • Fire-Resistant Landscaping

      DeGomez, Tom; Jones, Chris (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2013-02)
    • Fire-Resistant Landscaping

      Deneke, Fred; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
    • FIREWISE Plant Materials for 3,000 ft. and Higher Elevations

      DeGomez, Tom; Schalau, Jeff; Jones, Chris; Campbell, Steve (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • FIREWISE Plant Materials for 3,000 ft. and Higher Elevations

      Deneke, Fred; DeGomez, Tom; Schalau, Jeff; Jones, Chris; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
    • Insects, Diseases and Abiotic Disorders in Southwest Forests and Woodlands

      DeGomez, Tom; Garfin, Gregg (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2015-11)
      Recent events in the forests of the Southwest, and across western North America, have prompted scientists to consider the role of climate variability in insect and disease cycles. Studies focusing on Arizona and other southwestern states point to multiple, interacting climate-related mechanisms that increase the propensity for forest mortality. Effects of insects on forests are complex, and species and site dependent. Many influences, such as drought, decreased precipitation, increased temperature, increased vapor pressure deficit, and increased stand density, combined in nonlinear and overlapping ways to create the recent and devastating pine bark beetle outbreaks in Arizona forests. Climate clearly plays a role in many, but not all, Southwest insect cycles. It is important that educators demonstrate the complexity of all of the interplaying issues, in order to communicate no false impressions of an “easy” or “one-size- fits-all” solution” for land managers.
    • Living with Wildfire in Arizona

      Dolan, Corrine; Rogstad, Alix; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007)
      The Living with Wildfire in Arizona educational materials synthesize the most recent scientific and technically known information available on fire ecology for the ecosystems of Arizona, including mixed conifer forests, ponderosa pine forests, pinyon-juniper and oak woodlands, chaparral, grasslands and desert scrub, and riparian areas. The materials are meant to educate homeowners living in the wildland urban interface areas as to the natural function of fire in each ecosystem and what significant changes have impacted fire behavior over time. Information includes the natural role of fire, how and why fire behavior has changed over time, and the role that humans play in affecting that change in protecting themselves and their property.
    • Management of Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      DeGomez, Tom; Lenart, Melanie; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-11)
      Climate change may have dramatic effects on Arizona's forests and woodlands. Wildfires and insects may become of greater concern. Plant species will likely shift in elevation to adapt to the warming conditions.
    • Recovering from Wildfire: A Guide for Arizona's Forest Owners

      Deneke, Fred; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
    • Recovering from Wildfire: A Guide for Arizona's Forest Owners

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Soil Erosion Control after Wildfire

      Deneke, Fred; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-07)
    • Soil Erosion Control after Wildfire

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)