• Arizona Ranching Budgets 2016

      Teegerstrom, Trent; Tronstad, Russ (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2017-03)
      The dependency of Arizona ranchers on federal lands has been well documented. Mayes and Archer (1982) estimated that public and state grazing lands outside of the Indian reservations account for 85% of the total grazing land in Arizona. The partnership between private ranchers, state lands, and the federal government comes with many complex factors that influence the cost of doing business both in terms of variable and fixed costs. Not only are the regulations, fees, and enforcement of regulations a challenge for managing mixed land ownership, but additional costs from vandalism, theft, and daily disruptions of operations add to the normal operating expenses (Ruyle et al., 2000). Ownership and maintenance of range improvements, such as wells, spring development, and dirt tanks, etc., is also complicated by the rangeland ownership mix. This study is designed to examine the cost of ranching for different geographic areas in Arizona and show how different production costs exist throughout the state.
    • Arizona's Open Range "Law"

      Glenn, Erik; Dolan, Cori; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2010-12)
      Livestock are still an important part of rural life in Arizona. As more and more homes have been built adjacent to areas traditionally used for cattle grazing, the potential for conflict between livestock owners and homeowners has increased. Regardless of whether you yourself own large animals, you must be aware of your responsibilities towards your neighbors' livestock. The details of your responsibilities--and your liability--depend in large part upon where you live and whether you have a suitable fence around your property.
    • Principles of Obtaining and Interpreting Utilization Data on Rangelands

      Ruyle, George B.; Smith, Lamar; Maynard, Jim; Barker, Steve; Stewart, Dave; Meyer, Walt; Couloudon, Bill; Williams, Stephen; Univ Arizona, Coll Agr & Life Sci (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-10)
      A primary expression of stocking levels on rangeland vegetation is utilization defined as the proportion or degree of current years forage production that is consumed or destroyed by animals (including insects). Utilization may refer either to a single plant species, a group of species, or the vegetation as a whole. Utilization is an important factor in influencing changes in the soil, water, animal, and vegetation resources. The impact of a specific intensity of use on a plant species is highly variable depending on past and present use, period of use, duration of use, inter-specific competition, weather, availability of soil moisture for regrowth, and how these factors interact. Utilization data can be used as a guideline for moving livestock within an allotment with due consideration to season, weather conditions and the availability of forage and water in pastures scheduled for use during the same grazing season. In combination with actual use and climatic data, utilization measurements on key areas and utilization pattern mapping are useful for estimating proper stocking levels under current management. Utilization studies are helpful in identifying key and problem areas, and in identifying range improvements needed to improve livestock distribution. Reviewed 10/2016. Originally published 5/2007.
    • Principles of Obtaining and Interpreting Utilization Data on Rangelands

      Ruyle, George B.; Smith, Lamar; Maynard, Jim; Barker, Steve; Stewart, Dave; Meyer, Walt; Couloudon, Bill; Williams, Stephen; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2007-05)
      A primary expression of stocking levels on rangeland vegetation is utilization defined as the proportion or degree of current years forage production that is consumed or destroyed by animals (including insects). Utilization may refer either to a single plant species, a group of species, or the vegetation as a whole. Utilization is an important factor in influencing changes in the soil, water, animal, and vegetation resources. The impact of a specific intensity of use on a plant species is highly variable depending on past and present use, period of use, duration of use, inter-specific competition, weather, availability of soil moisture for regrowth, and how these factors interact. Utilization data can be used as a guideline for moving livestock within an allotment with due consideration to season, weather conditions and the availability of forage and water in pastures scheduled for use during the same grazing season. In combination with actual use and climatic data, utilization measurements on key areas and utilization pattern mapping are useful for estimating proper stocking levels under current management. Utilization studies are helpful in identifying key and problem areas, and in identifying range improvements needed to improve livestock distribution.
    • A Summary of Livestock Grazing Systems Used on Rangelands in the Western United States and Canada

      Howery, Larry D.; Sprinkle, James E.; Bowns, James E. (College of Agriculture, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2016-12)
      The objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the major grazing systems that have been used on rangelands in the western U. S. and Canada, to summarize the conditions under which they may be applicable, and to highlight examples from the southwestern U. S. when relevant. Revised 12/2014. Originally published 09/2000.
    • A Summary of Livestock Grazing Systems Used on Rangelands in the Western United States and Canada

      Howery, Larry D.; Sprinkle, James E.; Bowns, James E.; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of; Animal Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2000-09)
      The objectives of this article are to provide an overview of the major grazing systems that have been used on rangelands in the western U. S. and Canada, to summarize the conditions under which they may be applicable, and to highlight examples from the southwestern U. S. when relevant.