• Comandra Blister Rust

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      Mondell pine should not be planted within a mile of Comandra populations. Infection of pine occurs through needles by spores produced on Comandra, but spores produced on pine cannot re-infect pine. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for blister rust.
    • Management of Forests and Woodlands (Climate Change and Variability in Southwest Ecosystems Series)

      DeGomez, Tom; Lenart, Melanie; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2006-11)
      Climate change may have dramatic effects on Arizona's forests and woodlands. Wildfires and insects may become of greater concern. Plant species will likely shift in elevation to adapt to the warming conditions.
    • Pine Bark Beetles

      DeGomez, Tom; Young, Deborah; Entomology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2009-05)
      This paper provides evidence of the infestation caused by pine bark beetles in Arizona. It provides information about their life history, and how to prevent and control them.
    • Recovering from Wildfire: A Guide for Arizona's Forest Owners

      Deneke, Fred; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-08)
    • Recovering from Wildfire: A Guide for Arizona's Forest Owners

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • Soil Erosion Control after Wildfire

      Deneke, Fred; Natural Resources & the Environment, School of (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2002-07)
    • Soil Erosion Control after Wildfire

      DeGomez, Tom (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-12)
    • True Mistletoes

      Olsen, Mary W.; Young, Deborah; Plant Pathology (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 2011-01)
      True mistletoes are parasitic flowering plants with characteristic clumps of growth that are easily visible on the host plant. They reduce the growth of infected hosts, but it usually takes many years for true mistletoe infections to kill a mature tree or shrub. This article gives information about the disease cycle, the symptoms and prevention and control methods for true mistletoes.